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19 JULY 2013

The Education Research Global Observatory

"ERGO is a project on the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As a signatory to the Budapest Open Access Initiative, the ERGO is dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of open access ('free to read') scholarship in education."

(Gene V Glass and Gustavo E. Fischman)

TAGS

academic journalsapplied researchavant-garde • Budapest Open Access Initiative • directory of education research • Directory of Open Access Journals in Education • educationeducation research • Education Scholarship Global Observatory • enquiry • ERGO • free to read • Gene Glass • Gustavo Fischman • list of research sources • National Education Policy Center • open accesspedagogical thoughtpedagogypeer-reviewed journalspromotion and dissemination • scholarship in education • scholarship of teachingUniversity of Colorado

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2012

The Family Factory: Developing Methods for Live 3D Animation

"In this way the puppeteers would be part of the development of the prototypes for the virtual puppets as well as the characters for the play, before the actual rehearsals would begin two month later. ...

The value of the actual meetings and workshops can not be emphasised enough. This gave the participants hands on experience with the constraints in the actual equipment and a chance to meet the team that would be responsible for operating it. It is not until the artist has a very physical and intuitive impression of the material and the involved people the creative process takes off for real–before this everything is abstract ideas. ...

In the planning of the research project and the actual production the division of labour within and between each field of activity were specified as outlined in section 3.

As the process went on the borders became more blurred exploring the new field between creative production in theatre and animation and methods from computer science and systems development. One of the big challenges was the development of a common language between the artist and the programmer/technicians and to define and invent new methods that were necessary to carry out the production.

I tried to explore the numerous reasons for this in the evaluation phase of the project. This was done by conducting qualitative interviews with the participants and by reviewing the large body of video documentation from the process. The footage was edited to a 50 minute documentary about the project on which the following assumptions are based (Callesen 2001)."

(Jørgen Callesen, 2003, p.15,18,30)

Callesen (2001) Virtual Puppets in Performance, Proceedings, Marionette: Metaphysics, Mechanics, Modernity, International Symposium, University of Copenhagen, 28. March – 1. April, 2001

Callesen, J. (2003) "The Family Factory – Developing new Methods for Live 3D Animation" in Madsen, K.H. Production methods: behind the scenes of virtual inhabited 3D worlds. Springer–Verlag, London.

TAGS

3D animation • abstract ideas • actual equipment • actual production • applied researchartistic practice • computer science methods • conceptualisationconstraintscreative practicecreative process • creative production in theatre • enquiry • evaluation phase • experimentation • field of activity • hands on experience • intuitive impression of the material • new methodsparticipantsperformance • physical impression of the material • planningPRAMnetprototype • prototype development • puppetpuppeteerqualitative interviewsresearchresearch project • reviewing • systems development • theatretheory buildingvideo documentationvirtual puppetworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2011

Participant Observation as a Data Collection Method

"Participant observation, for many years, has been a hallmark of both anthropological and sociological studies. In recent years, the field of education has seen an increase in the number of qualitative studies that include participant observation as a way to collect information. Qualitative methods of data collection, such as interviewing, observation, and document analysis, have been included under the umbrella term of 'ethnographic methods' in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to discuss observation, particularly participant observation, as a tool for collecting data in qualitative research studies. Aspects of observation discussed herein include various definitions of participant observation, some history of its use, the purposes for which such observation is used, the stances or roles of the observer, and additional information about when, what, and how to observe."

(Barbara B. Kawulich)

Barbara B. Kawulich (2005). Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research. Volume 6, No. 2, Art. 43 – May 2005.

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TAGS

academic journal • anthropological studies • anthropology • collecting data • data collectiondocument analysiseducation researchenquiryestablished research methodsethnographic methodsethnographyinterviewingobservationparticipant observationqualitative research methods • qualitative research studies • qualitative studies • research methods • role of the observer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2011

Phenomena we confront are always richer than the abstractions we use to explain them

"The realization that the phenomena we confront are always richer than the abstractions we use to explain them is central to a Goethean approach. This realization is the expression of a two–fold awareness or sensitivity that Goethe points to with his expression 'delicate empiricism' (Goethe, 1829, in Miller, 1995, p. 307). First, we experience a phenomenon (a mouse, a wooded swamp, a range of blue hills in the distance, or the clouds moving across the sky) as a kind of fullness that calls forth wonder, curiosity, questioning. We want to get to know it better, or as Goethe states it radically, 'become utterly identical with it' (ibid.). This is empiricism, because we orient all our striving around the phenomena themselves. A phenomenon is what meets the eye but we also experience it is as something more, as a kind of surface that is pregnant with a depth we may be able to plumb. But we realize that we will not fathom these depths with models and theories, which more likely than not will lead us away from the phenomenon itself."

(Craig Holdrege, 2005)

Craig Holdrege Summer 2005, 8.1. 'Doing Goethean Science' Janus Head.

TAGS

abstract modelsabstractionabstractionsacademic journal • delicate empiricism • enquiry • Goethe • Goethean approach • Goethean methodology • Goethean science • Johann Wolfgang von Goethephenomenaphenomenologyphenomenonresearchtheoretical reflectiontheories

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2011

Density Design: a Politecnico di Milano research lab

"DensityDesign is a Research Lab in the design department (INDACO) of the Politecnico di Milano. It focuses on the visual representation of complex social, organizational and urban phenomena. Although producing, collecting, and sharing information has become much easier, robust methods and effective visual tools are still needed to observe and explore the nature of complex issues.

Our research aim is to exploit the potential of information visualization and information design and provide innovative and engaging visual artifacts to enable researchers and scholars to build solid arguments. By rearranging numeric data, reinterpreting qualitative information, locating information geographically, and building visual taxonomies, we can develop a diagrammatic visualization – a sort of graphic shortcut – to describe and unveil the hidden connections of complex systems. Our visualizations are open, inclusive, and preserve multiple interpretations of complex phenomena.

DensityDesign is committed to collaborating with other researchers and organizations devoted to academic independence and rigor, open enquiry, and risk taking to enhance our understanding of the world."

(DensityDesign, Design Research Lab)

Fig.1 "Cooperative Design Knowledge "

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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