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Which clippings match 'Microbe' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 APRIL 2014

Virality: Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks

Tony D. Sampson (2012). "Virality. Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks. University of Minnesota Press.

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TAGS

2013 • age of networks • Alexander Galloway • antivirus industry • Antonio Negri • assemblage theory • biological knowledge of contagion • biological meme • biological metaphor • Bruno Latour • category clutter • clash of cultures • communication theory • concerns over too much connectivity • contagion • contagion theory • contagious affects • contagious assemblagescontagious desire • contagious events • contagious phenomena • contagiousness of phantomscritical position • crowd behaviour • cultural studiesdiversity • document classification • Emile Durkheimempathy • Eugene Thacker • Gabriel TardeGilles Deleuze • global cultures • global financial crisis • hybrid states of constant flows • hybridity • imposing identities • imposing oppositions • imposing resemblancesinformation exchangeinformation flowinformation theoryintangibility • limiting analysis • mass culture • mass empathy • media archeology • media studies • media theorist • medical metaphor • Michael Hardt • microbe • microbial contagion • microsociology • mindless acceptance • mindless imitation • modernism • molecular • molecular epidemiology studiesmolecule • nature of being • network analysis • network culture • network cultures • network science • network society • network theory • networked informationnetworks • neurological metaphor • neurosciencenodes and connections • non-imitation • non-linear ontology • online social spaces • ontological worldview • over categorisation • overcategorise • physical social spaces • purity • regressive listener • reliance on representational thinkingrepresentational thinkingrepresentational thinking expressed in analogiesrepresentational thinking expressed in metaphors • resist contamination • resuscitating • revolutionary contagion • social and cultural domains • social behaviour of networking • social bodies • social media • social relationalities • socialisation • sociological event • sociological studies • sociology • sociology of networks • solidarity within crowds • somnambulist • spontaneous revolution • stoic behaviour • subject indexing • terrorismTheodor Adorno • Tony Sampson • viralviral love • viral networks • virality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2010

Scientists create first synthetic living cell

"Scientists in the US have succeeded in developing the first synthetic living cell. The researchers constructed a bacterium's 'genetic software' and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species 'dictated' by the synthetic DNA. ... The researchers constructed a bacterium's 'genetic software' and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species 'dictated' by the synthetic DNA. ... Dr [Craig] Venter likened the advance to making new software for the cell. The researchers copied an existing bacterial genome. They sequenced its genetic code and then used 'synthesis machines' to chemically construct a copy. Dr Venter told BBC News: 'We've now been able to take our synthetic chromosome and transplant it into a recipient cell – a different organism. 'As soon as this new software goes into the cell, the cell reads [it] and converts into the species specified in that genetic code.' The new bacteria replicated over a billion times, producing copies that contained and were controlled by the constructed, synthetic DNA. 'This is the first time any synthetic DNA has been in complete control of a cell,' said Dr Venter."

(Victoria Gill, BBC News)

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TAGS

2010artificial life • bacteria • bacterial genome • bio-ethicsbiologybreakthroughcelldiscoveryDNAethics • genetic code • genetic engineering • genetic software • microbeorganismspeciessynthesis machinessyntheticsynthetic biology • synthetic living cell • Synthia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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