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Which clippings match 'Research Funding' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

Research Professional: an online database of research funding opportunities and research policy news

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2013

The (UK) National Institute for Health Research

"The mission of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is to maintain a health research system in which the NHS supports outstanding individuals, working in world class facilities, conducting leading edge research focused on the needs of patients and the public. ...

Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has worked with key partners involved in the different elements of NHS research to transform research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research."

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TAGS

2006 • applied health research • basic science • clinical medicineclinical researchDepartment of Healthhealth • health research • leading edge research • medical practicemedical research • National Institute for Health Research • NHS • NIHR • patientpatient care • patient needs • primary careresearch • Research for Patient Benefit • research funding • RfPB • Sally Davies • tangible benefits • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2012

UK Arts and Humanities Research Council: research funding themes

"The AHRC is holding three open events focussing on our current themes: Care for the Future, Digital Transformations, Science in Culture, Translating Cultures, and the Connected Communities Programme.

The aim of the events is to provide background information about the development of the themes and activity to date, to consult on the future shape of the themes, including funding calls, and to provide attendees with an opportunity to discuss research ideas of potential relevance to the themes and network with colleagues."

(AHRC, 04 July 2012)

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TAGS

2012AHRC • care for the future • connected communities • digital transformations • funding callfunding prioritiesnetworking eventopen eventresearch funding • research ideas • research themes • science in culture • themes • translating cultures • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 APRIL 2012

Revised AHRC Research Funding Guide for Practice-Led Research

"If you are applying for funding to support a practice–led research project, please read the following advice for framing your proposal.

For your research to be considered as practice–led, your own practice must be an integral part of the proposed programme of research, and the creative and/or performative aspects of the research must be made explicit. Interdisciplinary proposals are welcomed, including those which fall within subjects traditionally defined as humanities as long as the main focus of the research is practice–led.

The research carried out should bring about enhancements in knowledge and understanding in the discipline, or in related disciplinary areas. This requirement excludes research to provide content. For example, if a film–maker wanted to make a film about refugees, the research questions should be about the process of making the film, not about the experience of the refugees. Work that results purely from the creative or professional development of an artist, however distinguished, is unlikely to fulfil the requirements of research."

(AHRC, p.72)

2). Arts and Humanities Research Council (January 2012). "Research Funding Guide" Version 1.7

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TAGS

2012AHRCarts and humanitiesArts and Humanities Research Councilcontribution to knowledgecreative practice researchdesign research projectguidelinesHEI • Independent Research Organisation • interdisciplinary • interdisciplinary proposals • knowledge and understandingpractice-based research • programme of research • requirements of research • researchresearch fundingResearch Funding Guideresearch processresearch projectresearch questionsresearch requirementsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2011

Stop funding Mickey Mouse degrees, says top scientist (a plea to stall the advancement of regionalising discourses)

"A leading scientist has attacked the government for funding students doing 'Mickey Mouse' degrees – and called for the money to be spent on science instead.

Dr Richard Pike, chief executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry, said degrees in celebrity journalism, drama combined with waste management, and international football business management – all of which exist – should be 'kicked into touch'.

Funds for the courses should be channelled into science degrees and research. ...

Pike said degree courses should reflect the challenges the country will face in the future, rather than an 'ephemeral demand that in 10 years' time will be viewed as a curiosity'. ...

'Funding for the sciences should be ringfenced so that, in effect, it becomes a more dominant component. This is not a question of pleading a special case. Such a move is essential if we are all to enjoy the lifestyle we have become accustomed to, and ensure that we are prepared for the changes that will affect us all in the future.

'We need a population with an enduring set of skills, such as an understanding of the physical world around us, literacy and communication, numeracy, and how to function and continue to learn in a complex society.'"

(Jessica Shepherd, 10 February 2010, guardian.co.uk)

[While Dr Richard Pike is making a noble effort –it is a vain one. His plea is a naive attempt to stall the advancement of regionalising discourses (Bernstein 2000, p.52) as they continue to undermine the authority of the strong classification principles (Bernstein 2000, p.99) of the traditional European Enlightenment university disciplinary model (Nussbaum 1997; Weeks and Glyer 1998). His comments fail to recognise dramatic global technological and sociological changes (Beck, Giddens et al. 1994) which have accelerated the pace of change and whose needs steadily diminish the relevance and potency of traditional scholarly insight.

Beck, U., A. Giddens, et al. (1994). Reflexive Modernization Politics Tradition and Aesthetics in the Modern Social Order. Stanford California, Stanford University Press.

Bernstein, B. (2000). Pedagogy Symbolic Control and Identity Theory Research Critique. Oxford, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship Reconsidered Priorities Of The Professoriate. Scholarship Reconsidered Priorities Of The Professoriate. New York, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 15–16.

Nussbaum, M. (1997). Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press.

Weeks, D. L. and D. Glyer (1998). The Liberal Arts in Higher Education. Challenging Assumptions Exploring Possibilities. Lanham, Maryland, University Press of America.]

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TAGS

Alistair Darling • an enduring set of skills • celebrity journalism • classification principles • complex society • cultural forms • cuts and closures • disciplinary knowledgedisciplinary protectionismDrama with Waste ManagementEuropean Enlightenment • fundamental sciences • fundinghigher educationHigher Education Funding Council for England • international football business management • knowledge regionalisation • leading-edge work • Mickey Mousenumeracyphysical worldpublic money • put the genie back in the bottle • reflexive modernisationregionalisation of knowledge • regionalising discourses • research fundingRichard Pike • ringfencing • Royal Society of Chemistry • RSCscholarshipscience • traditional scholarly endeavour • university degrees • university disciplinary model • vertical discourses • waste management

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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