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Which clippings match 'Small Screen' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 AUGUST 2013

Kevin Spacey: television has entered a new golden age

"He said Netflix ... had proved one thing: 'The audience wants control. They want freedom. If they want to binge–as they've been doing on House of Cards–then we should let them binge.

'We have learned the lesson that the music industry didn't learn: give people what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it in, at a reasonable price, and they'll more likely pay for it rather than steal it. Well, some will still steal it, but I believe this new model can take a bite out of piracy.'

But if the medium was to continue in this rich vein, TV executives would have to adapt to the way viewers want to binge on their favourite programmes on the internet or by watching DVD box sets, Spacey said.

Younger viewers no longer saw any difference between watching TV and online. 'For kids growing up, there's no difference between watching Avatar on an iPad or watching YouTube on a TV and watching Game of Thrones on their computer. It's all content. It's all story,' he said."

(John Plunkett and Jason Deans, 22 August 2013, The Guardian)

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TAGS

1950s1980s • Aaron Paul • AMC • AMC Networks • American Beauty • American Movie Classics (AMC) • art formaudience • binge • Breaking Bad (television) • broadcasterbroadcasting • Bryan Cranston • cable channel • cable televisioncharacter-driven stories • cliff-hanger • complex characterisation • control • David Fincher • demassificationdemassified media • DVD box set • Edinburgh Television Festival • Game of Thrones (television) • golden age • HBO • Hill Street Blues • Home Box Office (HBO) • Homeland (television) • House of Cards • iPad • Jack Lemmon • Kevin Spacey • Mad Menmusic industryNetflixOrson Wellespilot episode • programme maker • risk averserisk-taking • sense of total abandon • small screenstorytellingtechnological changetelevision channeltelevision networktelevision programming • The Sopranos (television) • The Usual Suspects • TV • video-streaming service • YouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Alex Shutti
11 MAY 2012

Luke Wroblewski on: Multi-device Layout Patterns

"Through fluid grids and media query adjustments, responsive design enables Web page layouts to adapt to a variety of screen sizes. As more designers embrace this technique, we're not only seeing a lot of innovation but the emergence of clear patterns as well. I cataloged what seem to be the most popular of these patterns for adaptable multi–device layouts."

(Luke Wroblewski, 14 March 2012, via Christopher Allwood)

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TAGS

adapt to screen sizes • adaptable multi-device layout • adaptive layoutBBC • column • column drop • columnscommunication design • design for large screen • design for mobiledesign for the screendesign innovationFacebook • Five Simple Steps • fluid grids • Food Sense (website) • Google (GOOG)grid systemHCI • image layout • information architectureinteraction designinterface designlayout • layout adjustments • layout designlayout patterns • layout shifter • layouts • Luke Wroblewski • margins • media query adjustments • mobile design • Modernizr • mostly fluid • multi device • multi-column layout • multi-devicemulti-device adaptation • multi-device layout patterns • multiple screen sizes • NUI • off canvas • optimised for mobilepage layoutpage layout pattern • Path (app) • responsive design • responsive design layout patterns • responsive web design • screen size • screen sizesscreen space • single column layout • small screen • small screen sizes • small screens • stacking • stacking columns • The Boston Globe • tiny tweaks • Trent Walton • UIusabilityvisual communicationvisual screen designweb designweb page layoutsweb pageswebsite

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2006

ShotCodes: Browsing The Web On Camera Phones Through Offline URL Barcodes

"Hardly a week goes by without another company unveiling a new service (often based on barcode or RFID scanners) to facilitate the interaction between people and physical objects. Still, Dutch ShotCodes has managed to take a original shot at this market with a visual approach that will appeal to consumers because, well, visuals always appeal to consumers.

What is it? In their own words: 'Today, businesses cannot get people to use their mobile phones to browse the internet. This is because typing in domain names on a phone is a time–consuming and frustrating process. ShotCodes change all of this, radically. ShotCodes are offline web links. When captured by a mobile camera, ShotCodes instantly and effortlessly take users to any desired location on the internet on their phones. ShotCodes are easy to make and can be tied to any web address.'

Businesses can make their own ShotCodes and add them to existing print media or turn them into brand new tools for sales and customer interaction. End users can download free software (via sms/texting) and install it on their mobile phone. This software, which is available for major mobile phone brands and types, enables phones to act upon ShotCodes. For a demo, see: www.shotcode.com/data/movieformat.

ShotCodes is a new technology that allows users of camera phones to access Web pages on their phones without having to enter URLs into their handsets. The system works in a similar manner to barcodes: users snap circular barcodes; that are recognised by Java software on the host phone; that references (looks–up) a database of associated Web addresses. In this way the placement of printed ShotCode patterns in the concrete environment could provide a means for phone users to access associated online content.
Review list of compatible camera phones."
(Springwise, 2006)

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21 JUNE 2005

Your Social World On A Phone Screen

Steven Blyth (Interaction Design Institute Ivrea)
The Social Fabric, by Steven Blyth, is a representation of your social world, displayed as a single visual array on your mobile phone. It keeps you informed about which relationships are prospering, which you have neglected, and the overall state of your social fabric.A series of avatars on your phone screen represent your friends, acquaintances or relatives. The frequency of all digital communications (they can include voice calls, voice Messages, SMS, MMS, e–mail, Instant Messaging, VoIP, etc.) between you and each person, which the system monitors, determines that avatar's posture: an alert stance indicates frequent recent contact, for example; a lethargic posture or turned back means neglect. You can also register non–digital contacts manually.

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