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18 JANUARY 2013

Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art

"Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD–Rom, DVD–Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth–century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD–Rom. A novel research archive of international significance, the collection complements the holdings in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections of illuminated manuscripts and the early modern printed book, and adds to the breadth of its important collections in human sexuality, Asian Studies, and Media, Film, and Music."

(Cornell University Library)

TAGS

2002American • American new media arts • archiveart • catalogues • CD-ROMChinese • Chinese new media arts • cinemacollection • commercialisation of mass media • Contact Zones • Cornell UniversityCornell University Library • designs • digital interfaces • DVD-ROMfilmholdingsinstallation • international art • InternetInternet artmass mediamediamonographs • multimedia artworks • musicnet artnew media artnew media artsonline and offlinephotography • Professor Rose Goldsen • research archive • resource guides • soundspecial collections • Timothy Murray • twentieth-century developments • unpublished manuscripts • video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

Continue: from simple bifurcation to a graduated field of complexity

"*_Zu Beginn sind auf dem Bildschirm eine weiße und eine schwarze Fläche sichtbar, in denen Continue bzw. 'quit' geschrieben stehen. Entscheidet man sich per Mausklick für die zweite Möglichkeit verlässt man die Arbeit. Entscheidet man sich für die erste Variante, so verdoppelt sich jeweils die Zahl der Felder. Bald sind die sich stets verkleinernden Flächen nicht mehr als einzelne zu erkennen und mit der Maus ist kein eindeutige Wahl mehr zu treffen.

Continue ist eine minimalistische, konzeptuelle Arbeit, die immer wieder neu die immer gleiche Frage nach dem Fortsetzen des interaktiven Prozesses stellt."

(ZKM)

Fig.1,2,3 Dieter Kiessling (2002). 'Continue', artintact #4/2 in Jeffrey Shaw and Astrid Sommer Eds.'artintact', Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe

[The work progresses from distinct binary divisions identified as 'Quit' or 'Continue' to progressively smaller and smaller subdivisions creating an increasingly cinereous/greyer and more graduated field. In this way the work can be used as a metaphor to illustrate a type of complexity which Basil Bernstein describes as strong classification of discourse where 'the progression will be from concrete local knowledge, to the mastery of simple operations, to more abstract general principles' (2000, p.11).]

Bernstein, Basil. (2000). 'Pedagogy Symbolic Control and Identity, Theory Research Critique'. Oxford, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

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TAGS

01011997abstractionartintactartistic practice • Astrid Sommer • bifurcationbinary • binary divisions • checkerboard • complexity • continue • Continue (Kiessling) • crisis of empiricismcritiquedatadesign formalism • Dieter Kiessling • DVD-ROM • graduated field • interactive designJeffrey Shawmetaphorpatternquitscalestrong classificationsubdivisionsZentrum fur Kunst und MedientechnologieZKM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2004

Their Things Spoken: a catalogue of Their belongings

"Their Things Spoken by Agnes Hegedüs refers to the gulf between the conservation and valuation of officially recognized cultural representations and the information content of bearers of personal significance originating in apparently unimportant, unknown biographies. The artist distributed among visitors to the ZKM a leaflet asking, 'Why not put your favorite object in a museum?' This question stimulated the museum visitors to reflect upon rituals of appreciating and keeping, and to relate the museum exhibits to the relics to which they attribute private significance.

Using a Polaroid camera to document contributors and objects, and a tape recorder for their stories and comments, she imposed no restrictions on the choice of personal favorites.

Her concern was to warehouse the portraits of people and objects in the most neutral possible way, so that every image and statement is equally valid. The DVD–ROM storage medium allows the body of contributions to be archived exactly as they were documented. The stories stand for themselves and, like an atlas of everyday life, show a random collection of people whose relationship to the world is revealed through the objects they identify with."
(Ursula Frohne)

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