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Which clippings match 'Cultural Artefacts' keyword pg.1 of 2
23 JUNE 2015

Moritz Stefaner: Selfiecity

Moritz Stefaner speaking about his work on the Selfiecity.net project (part 2) at the 'Visualized' conference in New York, 6-7 February 2014.

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2014 • Alise Tifentale • amateur cultural production • Amazon Mechanical Turk • BangkokBerlinbig databrowsing interfacecitiescognitive sciencecultural artefactscultural specificity • Daniel Goddemeyer • data abstraction • data filtering • data visualisation • design collaboration • design conferencedigital humanities • Dominikus Baur • faceface recognitionfaces of peoplefacial analysisfacial compositefiltering • human activity • information aestheticsinformation visualisationInstagram • Jay Chow • Lev Manovich • mass selfie • Mehrdad Yazdani • Moritz Stefaner • Moscow • Nadav Hochman • new media artNew Yorkportrait photographSan PaoloselfieSelfiecity (2014)social media projecttelematicsTokyo • University of Applied Sciences Potsdam • University of Osnabrueck • video lecturevisualising dataVisualized conference

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Future Knowledge: Lev Manovich Interview

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21st centuryAdobe IllustratorAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effects • always-changing field • contemporary designcontemporary media • contemporary media software • cultural artefactsdigital cultureearly 20th centuryearly 21st centuryelectronic technologiesFinal Cut ProGoogle Earthinteractive environments • interface to the world • interfaces • Lev ManovichMaya • mechanical technologies • media • media applications • media authoring • media machinemedia sharing • media-specific tools • medias access • memory • our imagination • physical technologies • software • software for media authoring • Software Takes Command • The Language of New Mediathe medium • theory of the technology • tools shape • universal engine • universal language • visual aestheticsweb services

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
31 JULY 2013

Was Ways of Seeing the first pre-digital book?

"Everyone is talking about the way in which digital media is destabilizing print. I thought it was interesting to choose the reverse scenario: something that started digital but found its real audience in print. Ways of Seeing started as a four–part television series on the BBC in England conceived of and written by art critic John Berger. Berger was reacting specifically to the traditional connoisseurship of Kenneth Clark in the Civilisation series, another famous television program, which inscribed the canonical march of Western culture in heroic terms. As a critique of Clark, Berger created a popular reading of the icons of western art not as aesthetic objects, but deeply cultural artifacts that reveal, upon close 'reading', the limitation, prejudice, bias, and obsession of the culture from which they sprang.

This form of cultural criticism was established in the Universities, especially Marxist leaning polytechnics, but had never before had such a popular airing. The idea that classic paintings could be decoded to reveal social facts–and in fact Berger compared them to modern advertising–was heretical and his work was met with incredulity and anger in the hallowed halls of University Art History departments around the country, But Berger's position, especially his proto–feminist critique of female nudes, would grow to become the dominant form of art criticism in the years ahead.

The television program had moderate success but shortly after it aired Berger joined with producer Mike Dibb and graphic designer Richard Hollis to produce a printed version of the televised series. Clark had also produced a book to accompany Civilisation: a huge, lavish, full–color coffee table monster that must have weighted 10 kilos. In contrast Berger, Dibb and Hollis produced a slim paperback, 127 x 203mm, of only 166 pages. Even more radical, the book was produced in black + white, reducing the famous art to mere notations on standard, uncoated paper of a trade book. It was published by the BBC Books under the Pelican Books imprint, a division of the venerable Penguin Press organized to publish books to educate rather than entertain the reading public.

Even more striking was the book's design. Hollis starts the text of the first essay on the cover: 'Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak.' This simple typographic trick gives the book both a certain modesty (saves on pages) and an urgency (no time to waste). Starting on the outside also suggests a digital quality, the content is broadcast to the reader even as they pass the shelf.

The interior is equally unusual. Hollis set the entire book in a bold sans serif font, a very unlikely choice and aggressively un–civilized. There is no nod to classicism, the book is an entirely modern form. The text is broken down into short bursts, usually no more than a paragraph coupled with a visual example. Again reflecting its origin as a televisual experience the text and images work simultaneously, one form leveraging the other. There are five such text–and–image essays on everything from renaissance nudes to modern advertising. But Berger also adds for entirely visual essays. He assembles a series of examples that by the power of his selection and through their aggressive juxtaposition, he makes his thesis without any words at all. In so doing he presages the development of the curated playlist as a predominant contemporary form and creates the first pre–digital book."

(Michael Rock, 2011, 2x4)

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2011 • 2x4 • aesthetic objectsart criticismart history • BBC Books • BBC Twoblack and white • canonical march • Civilisation (series) • contemporary form • cultural artefactscultural criticism • curated playlist • destabilising force • digital media • digital quality • educate rather than entertain • end of print • famous art • female nudes • heroic terms • John Bergerjuxtaposition • Kenneth Clark • Michael Rock • Mike Dibb • modern advertising • modern form • modestypaperback • Pelican Books • Penguin Random Housepolytechnic • pre-digital book • print and digitalprinted version • proto-feminist critique • renaissance nudes • Richard Hollis • sans-serif typeface • seeing comes before words • short formsocial factstelevision programmetelevision seriestelevisual experiencetext and image • trade book • typographic trick • uncoated paper • urgency • visual culturevisual essayWays of Seeingwestern artWestern culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2012

Archives New Zealand, Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

"Archives New Zealand, Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga is the official guardian of New Zealand's public archives. We gather, store and protect an extremely wide range of material. Our holdings include the originals of the Treaty of Waitangi, government documents, maps, paintings, photographs and film."

(The Aotearoa New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs Te Tari Taiwhenua)

Fig.1 "Toehold on a Harbour (1966)", Colour, 10 minutes, 35mm, 972 ft., DV file of Beta SP of telecini of 35mm film. W3606/c/25.
Fig.2 "Introducing New Zealand (1955)", W3471/kk/619 DV file of Beta SP telecini of 35mm film.
Fig.3 "Four Cities (1951) (AAPG W3471/3398)", Silent colour travelogue film around the major cities of New Zealand, Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. The major sites and scenes of the cities are shown. 2K scan of 16mm reversal print.

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2005Aotearoa New Zealandarchival materialarchive • Archives New Zealand • AucklandAustralasiaChristchurchconservation • contemporary recordkeeping • cultural artefactscultural collecting organisationscultural heritageDepartment of Internal AffairsDunedinfilmgovernment agencies • government documents • guardian • historical collectionhistorical significanceholdings • kept permanently • long-term value • mapsnational archivenational cultural heritage onlinenational heritagenewsreelpaintingsphotographs • Pictorial Parade • preservation • public archives • Public Records Act 2005 • records • repositorysocial history • Te Rua Mahara o te Kawanatanga • travelogueTreaty of Waitangitrolleybus • Weekly Review • Wellington

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

New Zealand National Library and the Alexander Turnbull Library

"We're in Beta, and we're excited to share this new National Library website with you. Why are we so excited? For the first time you can search right across our collections in one place. It's easier to get what you're after and easier to use it."

(The Aotearoa New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs Te Tari Taiwhenua)

Fig.1 Ref: 1/2–220232–F, Portrait of girl with fan, 1968, photographed by K E Niven & Co of Wellington.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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