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Which clippings match 'Alphaville' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 JULY 2012

Fahrenheit 451: passive consumption through audience participation

"When the 'Family' (the television with its 'cousin' announcers and actors) presents an interactive play in which Linda believes she has a role, an actor (Donald Pickering) wearing glasses with thick, black rectangular frames, turns to the camera as it zooms in on him and says, 'What do you think, Linda?'"

(Tom Whalen, Gale Student Resources In Context)

Whalen, Tom. "The Consequences of Passivity: Re–evaluating Truffaut's Fahrenheit 451," in Literature–Film Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 3, July, 2007, pp. 181(10).

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1966Alphaville • anti-intellectualism • audience participation • banbannedBernard Herrmannbig brotherbook • book burning • book-people • booksburning • Clarisse (character) • comic bookconformityconsolettecontroldisplay walldomestic futuresdystopiadystopian futureFahrenheit 451fire • fire department • firefighter • fireman • Francois Truffaut • Furia • futuristic societyGattacahousewifehumourindividualisminteractive dramainteractive experience • interactive teledrama • interactive television • It Happened Here (film) • Julie ChristieLinda (character)literature • Machiavelli • mahogany veneer • massificationmedia consumerMetropolis (1927)Montag (character)new forms of television • Nicolas Roeg • Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)Oskar Werner • parlor wall • parlour • participation dramaparticipative media • passive consumer • passive consumptionpicture newspaper • pro-literature underground • Ray Bradburyreadingreality televisionscience fictionself-reflexivity • sensory deprivation • speculative fictionsubversion • telecast • televisiontelevision screenThe Family (television) • The Handmaids Tale • The Martian Chronicles • The Prince (book) • THX 1138 • totalitarianism • TV parlor • TV story • TV wall • video wall • visual joke • wall TV • wall-sized screen • what do you think • written languagewritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2011

Alpha-ville 2011: International Festival of Post-digital Culture

London 22–25 September 2011: "Alpha–ville festival explores the intersection between art, technology and society and for this edition we are collaborating with various venues and spaces in London such us The Victoria & Albert Museum, Whitechapel Gallery, Rich Mix Cultural Foundation, Space Studios, Vortex Jazz Club, Netil House, XOYO and Hearn Street Warehouse to bring along an extensive 4–day event featuring social media art, kinect art, interactive installations, open labs, workshops, performances, screenings, live music & A/V shows, a one–day symposium and more!

The 2011 edition provides an online and live platform to explore, test and disseminate new ideas, emerging trends, collaborations and groundbreaking works. Running from 22–25 September and taking place alongside the London Design Festival, the 2011 edition enables a network of satellite events spreading across different London boroughs and links with other European cities such as Madrid (Twin Gallery) and Brussels & The Hague (Todays Art).

The festival programme also connects east and west London thorough a link with the V&A Digital Design Weekend."

(Alpha–ville 2011)

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2011Alpha-ville festivalAlphavilleart and technology • art technology and society • AV show • Brusselsdigital artdigital culturedigital design • Digital Design Weekend • digital media • digital media festival • emerging trends • eventfestival • Hearn Street Warehouse • innovationinteractioninteractive installation • International Festival of Post-digital Culture • kinect art • LondonLondon Design FestivalMadridmedia art • Netil House • new media • post-digital • post-digital culture • Rich Mix Cultural Foundation • satellite events • screening • social media art • Space Studios • symposiumThe Hague • Todays Art • Twin Gallery • V and AVictoria and Albert Museumvisualisation • Vortex Jazz Club • Whitechapel Gallery • XOYO

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 AUGUST 2010

Shanghai Thames Town: A little piece of England in China

"Tucked away near the last stop of Line 9, the satellite settlement of Thames Town opened in 2006 as part of Shanghai's One City, Nine Towns program, with low–rise apartments and gated complexes designed to house 10,000 residents. Despite an intensive marketing effort (including a beauty pageant), the community failed to take off, and what's left is a ghost town –– and an ideal place for a quiet afternoon stroll.

As its name suggests, the design of Thames Town is inspired by England, with a main square, red telephone booths, streets named High, Oxford, and Queen and, of course, its very own man–made Thames river. If you start to lose yourself in your surroundings, worry not: images of Haibao have made it out here to reassure you that you are, in fact, still in Shanghai."

(Frances Woo, 22 January 2010, CNNGo.com)

Fig.1 Anthony Skriba. 27 April 2010. 'three separate wedding parties', stillgoingnative

Fig.2 Sarah Low, 2009. 'Boxing Day / China Trip: Day 10 and 11'

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2006AlphavillearchitectureauthenticitycitycopyEngland • ersatzism • experience • folly • Haibao • mimesis • Nine Towns, One City • nostalgianoveltyPeoples Republic of Chinaplacereplicarepresentation • satellite settlement • Shanghaisimulation • Thames Town • theme parkUKurban planningurban simulationwedding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2009

Alphaville exists. Everywhere!

"Science–fiction films tell us as much about the time in which they were made as the future they project and between the two moments–the one specific, the other nominal (1984, 2001, etc)–a sense develops of their qualities of prescience and allegorical vision. The enterprise of proposing a world–to–be is always a hostage to the future's fortune. The law of diminishing returns that applies as regards special effects bears this out. How soon before Matrix–era 'bullet time' looks as dated as Douglas Trumbull's 'star gate' pyrotechnics in 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)? Which may explain why Alphaville hasn't aged as badly as other examples of the genre; it finds its 'special effect' in the specifically cinematic resource of light.

But this light, let's remind ourselves, is the light of the past brought to bear on the presence of the future now. Would it be going too far to suggest that, in adding the dimensions of past and future to the present of 1965, Godard was able to set the controls of his particular time machine to withstand the very test of time? There's no shortage of films that seek to travel in time following Alphaville, from Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) and Mauvais sang (Leos Carax, 1986) to Gattaca (Andrew Niccol, 1997) and Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998). There is also the developing genre of what critic Jonathan Romney has named 'steel and glass cinema' which he describes 'as cinema set in the recognisably contemporary urban world but framed and shot in such a way that it becomes detached, not unreal so much as irreal, bordering on science fiction', examples of which include Elle est des nôtres (She's a Jolly Good Fellow, Seigrid Alnoy, 2002), Demonlover (Olivier Assayas, 2002), Cypher (Vincenzo Natali, 2002) and Code 46 (Michael Winterbottom, 2003). Romney claims Alphaville to be 'the mother' of such cinema and with good reason. In the forty or so years separating Alphaville from Demonlover it has become evident that the no–place of Godard's dystopia, with its labyrinth of corridors and lobbies, was already one big non–place in waiting. The presence of the future that Godard was keen to capture back in 1965 has since taken shape as a global nonplace crossing continents and time–zones. 'It may be that we have already dreamed our dream of the future', J.G. Ballard has mused, 'and have woken with a start into a world of motorways, shopping malls and airport concourses which lie around us like a first instalment of a future that has forgotten to materialize.' Or, to put it another way, Alphaville exists. Everywhere."

(Chris Darke, Vertigo Magazine)

This is an edited extract from Chris Darke's monograph on J–L Godard's Alphaville to be published by I.B.Tauris in 2005. Chris Darke is a writer, critic and lecturer on the moving image. His book of selected writings, Light Readings, is published by Wallflower Press. He is also represented, with his film study Chris on Chris, on the DVD of La Jetée and Sans Soleil. See also pages 26 and 38.

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19651982198619971998 • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) • 200220032005airportAlphavillebetweenBrazilbullet timecritiqueculture • Dark City (1998) • Demonlover • dystopiaenvironmentfutureGattacainterzone • irreal • J G BallardJean-Luc Godard • labyrinth • lightmall • Mauvais Sang • non-placeRidley ScottSao Paolosci-fiscience-fictionsocial interactionsocietyspaceStanley Kubrick • Stargate • steel and glass cinema • The Matrix (1999)traditionurban

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2008

spring_alpha: networked game as social and citizenship experiment

"'spring_alpha' is a networked game system set in an industrialised council estate whose inhabitants are attempting to create their own autonomous society in contrast to that of the regime in which they live. The game serves as a 'sketch pad' for testing out alternative forms of social practice at both the 'narrative' level, in terms of the game story, and at a 'code' level, as players are able to re–write the code that runs the simulated world. The original narrative is based on a series of drawings by Chad McCail, 'Spring' and 'Evolution is Not Over yet', which also shape the game's visual style. The original stories and images become a framework that is fleshed–out by people's own ideas and experiences. The basic aim of the game is to change the rules by which the society in that world runs. This is done through hacking and altering the code that simulates that world, creating new types of behaviour and social interaction. How effective this becomes depends on the players' ability to spread these new ideas into the society."
(Simon Yuill)

TAGS

alphaAlphaville • autonomous society • belonging • Chad McCail • changing rules • citizenshipcodecollaborationcouncil estate • Demoville • Eleonora Oreggia • Evolution is Not Over yet • exhibitiongame • game story • interactive mediamultimedianarrative • Netherlands Media Art Institute • networked game • prototyperesearch • Ricardo Creemers • Simon Yuill • simulated world • sketch pad • social changesocietysoftware • Spring • spring_alpha • Stefan Gartner • technologytheory building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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