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Which clippings match 'Typeface' keyword pg.1 of 4
18 APRIL 2014

Positive and negative spaces form a skyline photo-alphabet

"Berlin–based photographer and illustrator Lisa Rienermann created this unique font out of buildings and blue skies while studying at the University of Duisburg–Essen; it was awarded a certificate of typographic excellence by the Type Directors Club New York back in 2007. 'It began with the 'Q,'' she has explained. 'I was in a kind of courtyard in Barcelona. I looked upward and saw houses, the blue sky and clouds. The more I looked, I saw that the houses formed a letter Q.' Click through for a better look at some of the letters."

(Caroline Stanley, 23 February 2011)

Fig.1 Lisa Rienermann (2007). "Type The Sky".

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2007alphabetBarcelonablue sky • building silhouettes • buildings and environmentsbuilt environmentcityscapecloud • compositional framing • compositional strategies • courtyard • editing through selectionexperimental type design • framing space • groupingletterform • letters in the landscape • Lisa Rienermann • negative spaceoutlineperceptual organisation • photoalphabet • photographic alphabet • photographic selection • positive space • selective framing • shapessilhouetteskyskylinetype • Type Directors Club • Type The Sky (2007) • typefacetypography • University of Duisburg-Essen • visual abstractionvisual approach • visual framing • visual similarity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2013

CSS Fonts Module Level 3: the @font-face rule

"The @font–face rule allows for linking to fonts that are automatically fetched and activated when needed. This allows authors to select a font that closely matches the design goals for a given page rather than limiting the font choice to a set of fonts available on a given platform. A set of font descriptors define the location of a font resource, either locally or externally, along with the style characteristics of an individual face. Multiple @font–face rules can be used to construct font families with a variety of faces. Using CSS font matching rules, a user agent can selectively download only those faces that are needed for a given piece of text."

(World Wide Web Consortium, 3 October 2013)

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2013CSS3 • Cufon • design for the screen • design goal • End User Licensing Agreement • EOT • EULA • font • font choice • font descriptor • font embedding • font family • font linking • font matching • font resource • font-face • font-face rule • fonts • inline SVG • Open Font License (OFL) • openfonts • Opentype • OTF • platform independent • selectively download • sIFR • style characteristics • SVG • TTF • typetypefaceTypekittypography • Typoteque • ubiquitous web fonts • user agent • W3Cweb design • web design typography • web technologies • web type • web typography • webfont • WOFF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

Tim Brown: advocating a universal typography

"The web is universal, so we should practice a typography that is equally universal. By focusing on traditional typographic principles, embracing progressive enhancement, and understanding how fonts, CSS, web–enabled devices, and user contexts coexist, we can reevaluate what it means to successfully set type – and inform the decisions we make about typefaces, font sizes, and white space. Let's practice future–friendly, responsive typography."

via Deb Polson [http://livingdata.tumblr.com/post/58980870798/for–my–advanced–web–design–students–the–little]

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2012A List Apartbest practices • Chris Silverman • CSSDe Stijldesign conferencedesign craftdesign formalismErik SpiekermannFog of War • font size • gestalt principles • glyph • grid systems • historical developments • Jeffrey Veen • Jeffrey Zeldman • John Allsopp • Karen McGrane • Kevin Kellymark-up • modular scale • molten leading • page breakpoints • page design • pixel-perfect control • Ray Schwartz • Ready to Inspire (conference) • remediation • responsive typography • Ryan Singer • Theo van Doesburg • Thomas Phinney • Tim Brown • traditional practicestypetype foundrytypefacetypesettingtypographic principlestypographyuniversal principlesuser contextweb designwhitespace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2013

The debate in 1991: digital or hand-crafted type?

"Metal setting is practised today by only a handful of specialists, but it continues to provide the standards by which good typesetting is judged. Photosetting, and the computer setting which has largely displaced it, are criticised for being too perfect and lacking the character of hand–crafted type. Now, increasingly, designers are using desktop publishing systems such as the Macintosh to do their typesetting. The technology has matured considerably over the last two years and the time is ripe for a reassessment: is good typesetting possible on the Macintosh?"

(Andy Benedek, 1991)

Andy Benedek (1991). "The craft of digital type" Winter no. 2 vol. 1, Eye Magazine.

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1991Adobe Systems • Aldus PageMaker • AppleApple LaserWriter • bit-mapped font • computer font • computer typesetting • Courier (typeface) • descender • design craftdesign for printdesktop publishingdisplay font • Emigre (magazine) • Eye (magazine) • font foundry • graphic designerhand-craftedhand-crafted typeHelvetica • hot metal typesetting • individual characterlegibility • letter-spacing • letterpress • Linotype (foundry) • MacMacintoshMacintosh computermetal type • metal typesetting • monotypeoffset printing • optical compensation • page description language • page layoutperfection • photosetting • PostScript • PostScript typeface • technology affordances • Times (typeface) • too perfect • traditional practicestypefacetypesettingtypography • Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber • URW

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Sinclair ZX81: semigraphical / pseudographical characters

"If you press GRAPHICS (shifted 9) then the cursor will come up as : this means graphics mode. If you type in a symbol it will appear in its inverse video form, & this will go on until you press GRAPHICS again or NEWLINE. RUBOUT will have its usual meaning. Be careful not to lose the cursor  amongst all the inverse video characters you've just typed in. ...

Right at the beginning are space & ten patterns of black, white & grey blobs; further on there are eleven more. These are called the graphics symbols & are used for drawing pictures. You can enter these from the keyboard, using graphics mode (except for space, which is an ordinary symbol using the  cursor; the black square is inverse space). You use the 20 keys that have graphics symbols written on them. For instance, suppose you want the symbol , which is on the T key. Press GRAPHICS to get the  cursor, & then press shifted T. From the previous description of the graphics mode, you would expect to get an inverse video symbol; but shifted T is normally <>, a token, & tokens have no inverses: so you get the graphics symbol  instead."

(Steven Vickers, 1981, Sinclair Research Limited)

Fig.1 "graphics mode" table from Steven Vickers (1981). "Sinclair ZX81 BASIC Programming", Second Edition 1981, Copyright 1980 Sinclair Research Limited (converted to HTML by Robin Stuart).

2). Matthew Eagles (2008). "ZX81 VDU" TrueType font which replicates the letters, numbers etc. displayed on the screen of the ZX81.

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1980s19818-bitbasic geometric shapesblack and white • block graphics • computer historygeometric figuresgeometric shapes • graphic symbols • graphical building block • graphics mode • history of computinghome computerindustrial archaeologymanualmonotone • PETSCII • pictorial systemspixel matrix • pseudographics • semigraphical characters • semigraphics • Sinclair Research Ltd • Sinclair ZX80 • Sinclair ZX81 • sixels • symbolsymbolstypefacevintage technologyvisualisationZX81

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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