Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'British Empire' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 NOVEMBER 2012

This Land Is Mine: the great Middle East tragicomedy

"I envisioned This Land Is Mine as the last scene of my potential–possible–maybe– feature film, Seder–Masochism, but it's the first (and so far only) scene I've animated. As the Bible says, 'So the last will be first, and the first will be last.'"

(Nina Paley)

Fig.1 Nina Paley (2012) "This Land Is Mine".

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TAGS

20122D animation • Alexander conquer • Alexander the Great • Ancient Egyptian • Ancient Greek • Angel of Death • animationapocalypseArab • Arab Caliph • Assyrian • Ayyubid dynasty • Babylonian • Babylonian Exile • belligerenceBibleBritish EmpireByzantine • Byzantine Empire • Caliph • Canaanite • Channukah • Children of Israel • conflictcontested state • Crusader • Crusadesdevil • Eastern and Western Empires • Egypt • Egyptian • Egyptian Mamluk • European Jew • freedom fighter • futility of warGreek • Greek-Macedonian • Grim Reaper • guerrilla warfareHamas • Hebrew Priest • Hezbollah • historyhistory of conflictideological intoleranceideologyIsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflict • Israelite • JerusalemJesus ChristJewish settlersJudaism • Kingdom of Jerusalem • Maccabee • Macedonian • Mamluk of Egypt • mamluks • militarized resistance movementsmilitaryMuslimNina Paley • Old Testament • Ottoman Empire • Ottoman Turk • Ottoman Turkish • ownershipPalestinePalestinian • Palestinian Liberation Organization • Palestinian territoriespeace • PLO • Ptolemaic • Ptolemy • Ptolmaic • RomanRoman Empire • Second Temple • Seder Masochism • Seleucid • Seleucids • State of Israelterritorialisationterritoryterrorist • terrorists • This Land Is MinetimelinetragicomicwarZionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2011

A going concern. Toilet signage as an international cultural artefact

"Toilet signage itself has a relatively young history, following that of the public loo, which only became common in the late nineteenth century, stimulated by increasing mobility and the separation of work from home. Public conveniences first appeared in British railway stations and department stores, but the practice was then exported through the British empire.

These early signs were text–based but increasingly mobile populations in the twentieth century encouraged the development of pictorial systems that did not require shared language. Visual languages such as the US Department of Transportation symbol system designed in 1974 – the first comprehensive pictogram system – and systems developed for the Olympics aimed for universality but very much reflected their Germanic roots in abstract systems such as those of Otto Neurath. Once embraced by international communications and business, they became part of the International Style."

(Lynne Ciochetto, 13 August 2009)

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TAGS

1974 • abstract systems • British Empire • British railway stations • cultural artefactdepartment storesGermanic rootsglobalisationgraphic representation • increasing mobility • India • international business • international communicationsInternational StyleInternational Typographic Style • late nineteenth century • Lynne Ciochetto • mobile populations • modernismOlympicsOtto Neurathpictogrampictogram systempictorial systemspostcolonial • public loo • rail • separation of work from home • shared languagesignssymbol systemtoilet signagetwentieth century • US Department of Transportation • visual communicationvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2010

Flagging interest in Nation Branding and National Identity?

"We are a changing, emerging state that no longer seeks inspiration from the present flag. It is part of our history and the role that it has played can be respected. We are moving from a predominantly bicultural society to one that now involves an important component of Pacific island people and also immigrants from Asia.

We must now seek inspiration, visual excitement and stimulus to creativity and excellence from many directions and develop a flag that can be a source of pride to New Zealanders as we continue to impact strongly on the wider world in the many areas of commerce, sport, films, literature, tourism and creative thinking in which we have to strive to excel."

(Ian Prior, 27 February 2004)

Fig.1 New Zealand National flag and state ensign; Fig.2 Michael Smythe, 'Koru (after Gordon Walters)'; Fig.3 Cameron Sanders; Fig.4 'Tino Rangatiratanga'; Fig.5 Kyle Lockwood.

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TAGS

2004Aotearoa New ZealandAsia-Pacificautonomy • biculturalism • brand development • brand recognitionBritish Empirechange of imageCommonwealthconstitution • creation of a brand • defaced Blue Ensign • distinguishing featuresflag • Gordon Walters • historyidentityindependenceIndigenous • koru • Koru Flag • Maori • Michael Smythe • motifnation brandingnational identity • NZFlag.com Trust • PacificPakehaplace brandingpostcolonial • Southern Cross • sovereigntysymbol • Tino Rangatiratanga • vexillologyvisual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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