Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Cisco' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 JANUARY 2013

Visualising interconnectedness through social network streams

"Tech City Map, created by developers at Trampoline Systems and designed by Playgen, pulls in streams of social network data for all of the businesses in the area to help analyse their influence. The Tech City Map follows in the footsteps of Matt Biddulph's original Silicon Roundabout map as well as Wired's very own version, produced in 2009."

(Olivia Solon and Nate Lanxon, 10 November 2011, Wired UK)

1

TAGS

2011 • academic partners • affinityAmazon.combusinessbusiness community • Central London • chartCiscoCity University Londoncluster mapping • creative startup • data visualisationDavid Camerondiagrameast LondonEast London Tech CityEric van der KleijFacebookGoogle IncGoogle MapsGreenwichHackneyhubImperial College Londoninformation visualisationIntelinterconnectedness • Islington • LondonLoughborough Universitymap • Matt Biddulph • media companiesnetwork • Newham • next-generation applications • next-generation services • Old Street • Old Street roundabout • Olympic Legacy Company • Olympic Park • Playgen • Qualcomm • Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park • relatedness • retweets • ShoreditchSilicon Roundabout • Silicon Roundabout map • Silicon Valleysoftware companiesstart-up business • Stratford • Tech City • Tech City cluster • Tech City Map • technology companies • Tower Hamlets • Trampoline Systems Ltd • Twitter streamUK • UK headquarters • University College LondonvisualisationVodafoneweb of connections

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2011

Alternate Reality Game: Cisco GSX Virtual Global Sales Event

"For the 2nd straight year, Juxt Interactive and No Mimes Media have teamed up to craft a hit Alternate Reality Game (ARG) for Cisco Systems' Global Sales Experience, an annual gathering of more than 21,000 executives around the world.

Part action thriller, part treasure hunt, The Hunt storyline unfolded over the course of two weeks, turning thousands of Cisco employees into active players in an immersive adventure. Fictional characters came to life through social media, posting Facebook and Twitter updates to drive the story in real–time, sometimes engaging participants in one–on–one conversations. The experience also incorporated cinematic video clips, email correspondence, and phone messages, and utilized an array of Cisco tools that enabled employees to communicate across departmental, cultural and geographical boundaries.

In the end, participants were able to unravel the mysteries of The Hunt through collective problem solving, real–time data sharing, and seamless global collaboration, all made possible by Cisco technologies."

(Juxt Interactive and George P. Johnson, 2011)

1

TAGS

2010 • action thriller • active players • alternate reality gameARGchoose your own adventure • cinematic video clips • Cisco • Cisco GSX • Cisco Systems • Cisco technologies • collective problem solving • cultural boundaries • departmental boundaries • email correspondenceemployeesfictional characters • geographical boundaries • George P. Johnson • global collaboration • Global Sales Experience • GPJ • immersive adventureinteractive narrative • Inxpo • JUXT Interactive • multiple platforms • narrative transmedia entertainment experiences • No Mimes Media • one-on-one conversations • phone messages • real-time • real-time data sharing • social media • storyline • The Hunt • transmedia storytellingtreasure hunt • unravel the mystery • user experience design (UX) • virtual event • virtual meeting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 APRIL 2010

15 March 2010: 25th anniversary of the first .com registration

"March 2010 will mark the 25th anniversary of the first .com registration. While we know that the first .com was assigned to symbolics.com on March 15, 1985, the genesis of .com is less clear. According to Craig Partridge, chief scientist at Raytheon BBN Technologies, the name for domains evolved as the system was created. At first, .cor was proposed as the domain name for corporations, but when the final version came out it was switched to .com.

It took some time for .com to take off. Two and a half years after the first registration, only 100 total .com domain name registrations existed. The early adopters included IBM, Intel, AT&T and Cisco. By 1992, there were still less than 15,000 .com domain names registered and the million–domain name mark wasn't crossed until 1997, well into the Internet boom. Then came the '.com boom', with nearly 20 million names registered in the next two years. The emergence of online businesses as well as early speculative activity fueled the rapid growth.

The burst of the 'bubble' cooled off the rapid growth for a short period, and since then .com has grown at a steady rate, with now more than 80 million domain names registered around the world. Yet, some of the most popular Web sites today were registered late into the .com era. Linkedin.com, for example, was registered in 2002 and flickr.com in 2003. Youtube.com wasn't registered until 2005."

(VeriSign, Inc.)

2). VeriSign, Inc. 'The Domain Name Industry Brief' Volume 7 – Issue 1 – February 2010

1

TAGS

.com • .cor • .net • 198520002010anniversaryAT and T • brochureware • Ciscodigital infrastructuredomain name • domain name registration • Flickrhistoryhistory of the internetIBMICTIntelInternetInternet boomLinkedInNASDAQonlinepioneeringregistration • symbolics.com • technology • VeriSign • YouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.