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Which clippings match 'Crafts Technology' keyword pg.1 of 2
31 DECEMBER 2014

Ultra low-fi Quake demake for analogue oscilloscope

"Programmer Pekka Väänänen has rendered a playable version of the classic first–person shooter Quake on an oscilloscope. Video game demakes – adaptations or ports that recreate a game in art styles or on hardware from before their time – have become trendy in recent years, but this demo is a particularly old–fashioned throwback. In 1958, physicist William Higinbotham created one of the first video games, a tennis simulation that ran on a Donner Model 30 analog computer and an oscilloscope display. That game used dots on a 2D plane; Väänänen's creation draws the shooter's 3D space in a style reminiscent of a high school student's sketch book."

(Chris Plante, 29 December 2014)

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TAGS

2014analogue correspondence • Audio Stream Input-Output (ASIO) • crafts technology • Darkplaces Quake • electronic analogues • electronic rendering • fan gameFinnishfirst-person shooterFPS (games) • graphic animation • Hitachi V-422 oscilloscope • Jed Margolin • line geometry • low-filow-techopen sourceoscilloscope • Pekka Vaananen • portingProcessing (software)Quakerealtime generated visuals • realtime rendered • recreate a game • recreate favourite video games • recreationreinterpretationremediationrendered on the screenretrogamingrevisionism • software porting • technology repurposingultra-low-techvector artvideo game • video game adaptation • video game demake • video game remake • visual translation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

MIT Media Lab: High-Low Tech Group

"High–Low Tech, a research group at the MIT Media Lab, integrates high and low technological materials, processes, and cultures. Our primary aim is to engage diverse audiences in designing and building their own technologies by situating computation in new cultural and material contexts, and by developing tools that democratize engineering. We believe that the future of technology will be largely determined by end–users who will design, build, and hack their own devices, and our goal is to inspire, shape, support, and study these communities. To this end, we explore the intersection of computation, physical materials, manufacturing processes, traditional crafts, and design."

(MIT Media Lab, 2011)

Fig.1 Jie Qi "Animated Vines" [http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1510]

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TAGS

2011being smart with technologycraft and designcrafts technologyengagement and participationhacking • haptic devices • haptic interface • high and low technology • High-Low Tech (centre) • interactive paper • manufacturing processes • material contexts • MIT Media Labnew craftsparticipatory culture • physical materials • research group • situating computation • smart craftingtangible prototype • technological materials • technological processes • technology facilitated sharingtechnology reshaped by artiststraditional craftsubiquitous technologies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2012

UK Imagineering Foundation: stimulating the imagination of young designers

"In 1999 a group of engineers in the Midlands [UK region] who were concerned at the rapidly increasing skills shortage in engineering, developed the concept of Imagineering. 'A new initiative, designed to introduce 8–16 year olds to the fascinating world of engineering and manufacturing through fun, hands–on personal experience, targets the engineers of the future at a young age, develops and holds their interest and hopefully, encourages them to consider engineering as a future career.'"

(Imagineering Foundation, UK)

Fig.1 "One young 'imagineer' constructs a working model that he can then programme using simple control technology at the Imagineering Jaguar Land Rover Education Business Partnership Centre, at Gaydon Warwickshire." [http://www.spaghettigazetti.com/2011/11/imagineering–welcomes–new–queen.html#!/2011/11/imagineering–welcomes–new–queen.html]

2). The Imagineering Timeline

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TAGS

1999 • 8-16 year olds • careercareer futurescareerschildrenconstructioncrafts technologycreative participationcreative skillsdesign thinkingdiscoveryengineeringengineering and manufacturing • engineers of the future • experimentationfunfuture careerhands-on • imagineer • imagineering • Imagineering Jaguar Land Rover Education Business Partnership Centre • learninglearning initiativeMidlands (region)pedagogypersonal empowermentpraxisskills shortageUK • Warwickshire • working model • young designersyoung peopleyouth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2010

Computational Studio Arts: the new crafts

"Goldsmiths' Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Computational Studio Arts can be described as 'smart crafting'. Four students talk about their work in this exciting new field of study.

[Janis Jeffries, Professor of Visual Arts in the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths explains] 'this is the first year of graduating students in the MFA in Computational Studio Arts. It's the first programme within the University of London which is very much about hands–on programming skills as what you might call 'the new crafts'. ...

'Because of the dynamic relationship between art, science and technology, probably some of the most interesting shows are now at the Science Museum and the Wellcome Foundation. They're really pressurising the conventions of the art world because people are much more engaged.'"

(Laura Taflinger, Creative Choices, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 OCTOBER 2009

Design Interactions: social, cultural and ethical consequences of emerging technologies

"In Design Interactions, then, we are not simply concerned with acquiring or refining a specific set of skills. Essentially, we are interested in the , and this means asking probing questions through design. To this end, we encourage students to consider the implications, as well as the applications, of new technologies, and thus to seek fresh approaches to interaction design–approaches that are meaningful and relevant today. In short, we see this field of design as a fertile way of thinking about the life around us, within us, and in the future beyond us."

(Royal College of Art)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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