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Which clippings match 'Being Smart With Technology' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 DECEMBER 2012

MIT Media Lab: High-Low Tech Group

"High–Low Tech, a research group at the MIT Media Lab, integrates high and low technological materials, processes, and cultures. Our primary aim is to engage diverse audiences in designing and building their own technologies by situating computation in new cultural and material contexts, and by developing tools that democratize engineering. We believe that the future of technology will be largely determined by end–users who will design, build, and hack their own devices, and our goal is to inspire, shape, support, and study these communities. To this end, we explore the intersection of computation, physical materials, manufacturing processes, traditional crafts, and design."

(MIT Media Lab, 2011)

Fig.1 Jie Qi "Animated Vines" [http://hlt.media.mit.edu/?p=1510]

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TAGS

2011being smart with technologycraft and designcrafts technologyengagement and participationhacking • haptic devices • haptic interface • high and low technology • High-Low Tech (centre) • interactive paper • manufacturing processes • material contexts • MIT Media Labnew craftsparticipatory culture • physical materials • research group • situating computation • smart craftingtangible prototype • technological materials • technological processes • technology facilitated sharingtechnology reshaped by artiststraditional craftsubiquitous technologies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2012

Graphic Design Communication students recreate an ornamental display font through contemporary and traditional processes

"Stage one Graphic Design Communication students have been developing a new ornamental display font with highly Individual characters inspired by drawing digitally and laser cut manufactured to the exacting standards reminiscent of a traditional font foundry.

Level tutor Nigel Bents and Associate Lecturer Paul Oakley will further support students by printing typographic posters at the New North Press."

(Graphic Design Communication at Chelsea College of Art and Design, 16 October 2011)

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TAGS

Adobe Illustratoralphabetbeing smart with technology • Bodoni • Chelsea College of Art and Design • compositor • contemporary font design • craftcraft nostalgiacraft skillscreative practicedesignerdisplay fontdrawing digitallyearly twentieth centuryfont • font design • graphic design communication • hybrid processindividual character • laser cut • laser cuttingmovable typenew crafts • New North Press • new techniques • Nigel Bents • ornamental • ornamental alphabet • ornamental display font • ornamental font • Paul Oakley • posterprintingprinting processrecreationrendered on the screenskillsstudentstechniquetechnology • traditional font foundry • traditional practicestraditional processtype • type founding • typographertypographic postertypographyUKvisual communicationwoodblock printing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2010

Computational Studio Arts: the new crafts

"Goldsmiths' Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Computational Studio Arts can be described as 'smart crafting'. Four students talk about their work in this exciting new field of study.

[Janis Jeffries, Professor of Visual Arts in the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths explains] 'this is the first year of graduating students in the MFA in Computational Studio Arts. It's the first programme within the University of London which is very much about hands–on programming skills as what you might call 'the new crafts'. ...

'Because of the dynamic relationship between art, science and technology, probably some of the most interesting shows are now at the Science Museum and the Wellcome Foundation. They're really pressurising the conventions of the art world because people are much more engaged.'"

(Laura Taflinger, Creative Choices, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 OCTOBER 2009

Design Interactions: social, cultural and ethical consequences of emerging technologies

"In Design Interactions, then, we are not simply concerned with acquiring or refining a specific set of skills. Essentially, we are interested in the , and this means asking probing questions through design. To this end, we encourage students to consider the implications, as well as the applications, of new technologies, and thus to seek fresh approaches to interaction design–approaches that are meaningful and relevant today. In short, we see this field of design as a fertile way of thinking about the life around us, within us, and in the future beyond us."

(Royal College of Art)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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