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Which clippings match 'Functionality' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 MAY 2013

Magic Lantern: modified firmware for Canon DSLR cameras

"Magic Lantern is a software enhancement that offers increased functionality to the excellent Canon DSLR cameras. We have created an open framework, licensed under GPL, for developing extensions to the official firmware.

Magic Lantern is not a 'hack', or a modified firmware, it is an independent program that runs alongside Canon's own software. Each time you start your camera, Magic Lantern is loaded from your memory card. Our only modification was to enable the ability to run software from the memory card.

ML is being developed by photo and video enthusiasts, adding functionality such as: HDR images and video, timelapse, motion detection, focus assist tools, manual audio controls much more."

(Magic Lantern)

Fig.1 Canon 5D Mark II HDR Video from Neumann Films testing Magic Lantern's HDR video function.

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TAGS

CanonCanon 5D • Canon 5Dmk2 • Canon 5Dmk3 • Canon 5DmkII • Canon 5DmkIII • Canon 7DCanon DSLRdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNG • DNG raw video • DSLR • DSLR camera • enthusiasts • firmware • functionalityGNU General Public License • GNU GPL • GPLH.264high definition videohigh resolution • increased functionality • Magic Lantern (software) • memory card • modified firmware • open frameworkopen platform • RAW video • software application • software enhancement • software extensions • software hack

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MARCH 2011

The top 10 major benefits of high-fidelity prototyping

"1) First and foremost, a high–fidelity prototype gives you something realistic enough to try out your ideas with target users and customers before making a significant investment. This lets you discover which ideas are good and which are not, and if the product has real value, and also discover if users can figure out how to use the product.

2) Doing a high–fidelity prototype helps you – even forces you – to think through your product to a much greater degree than paper specs.

3) A high–fidelity prototype enables and encourages the type of collaboration between product manager, interaction designer, and architect/engineer that is necessary to discover a valuable, useful and feasible product.

4) A high–fidelity prototype provides the level of information necessary for accurate engineering cost estimates, early in the process when these estimates are most useful.

5) A high–fidelity prototype provides the engineers and QA organization with a rich, interactive description of the product's intended functionality and design to be used as a reference basis for implementation and test.

6) A high–fidelity prototype provides the rest of the organization – marketing, sales, customer service, business development, company execs – with a useful understanding of the product to come early enough in the process that they have time to do their jobs properly.

7) A high–fidelity prototype prevents the classic waterfall problem of doing design after the requirements, rather than realizing that functionality and user experience are inherently intertwined.

8) If you do a high–fidelity prototype and you test your ideas with users and you find significant problems, you will have saved your company the cost in terms of time and money of building something that would have failed. Not to mention the opportunity cost of what the team could have been building.

9) If you do a high–fidelity prototype and validate this with target users, you will significantly reduce the time it takes for your developers to build the product both because the product is better defined, and also because you will have been forced to resolve many of the questions early that otherwise throw a wrench into development.

10) A high–fidelity prototype helps keep the focus of the team on the user experience."

(Marty Cagan, 29 April 2008)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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