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Which clippings match 'Dramaturgy' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 JANUARY 2014

The emergence of living newspapers in the early twentieth century

"The roots of the 'living newspaper' in Europe can be traced to Italian futurism in the early decades of the twentieth century. It was in the young Soviet Union (and principally the Moscow Institute of Journalism), however, that it was developed into a recognisable form of agitprop theatre. Performed by small bands of propagandists, the scripts for zhivaya gazeta were often pasted together from materials found in newspapers–though a high degree of improvisation was also encouraged–and were designed to provide illiterate audiences (such as workers or Red Army recruits) with details of campaigns, battles or other newsworthy events (Casson, 2000). Plays were performed on street corners or in other public spaces, with the aid of a handful of props and simple yet highly symbolic costumes [2].

By the late 1920s, however, zhivaya gazeta were already being seen as passé by many dramatists in the Soviet Union, with all forms of 'revolutionary agitational art' becoming 'increasingly unwelcome', and official attention turning towards the development of more sophisticated forms of theatre in the lead up to the adoption of socialist realism as official state doctrine in 1932 (Frolova‐Walker, 2006: 185). Indeed, Stalin disbanded the Blue Blouse Group, the main exponent of zhivaya gazeta, in 1928 (Casson, 2000:109)."

(Jeremy Taylor. p.29)

[2] Top hats, for instance, were used with much frequency to mark out a particular character as being bourgeois (Tolstoy, 1998: 24).

Jeremy E.Taylor (2013). The Sinification of Soviet Agitational Theatre: 'Living Newspapers' in Mao's China, Journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies, Vol. 2 July 2013.

TAGS

agitational art • agitprop theatre • Blue Blouse Group • dramaturgyearly twentieth centuryFuturism (art movement) • huobaoju • illiterate audiences • improvisationinterventionist art • Jeremy Taylor • John Casson • Journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies • Leo Tolstoy • living newspaper • Marina Frolova-Walker • Moscow Institute of Journalism • newspapers • newsworthy events • pasted together • propaganda • propagandist • public spacesRed Army • revolutionary acts • revolutionary agitational art • socialist realismSoviet Union • state doctrine • street theatre • symbolic costumes • theatre form • theatre history • transformational narrative • yangbanxi • zhivaya gazeta

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 OCTOBER 2012

Erving Goffman: backstage and frontstage behaviour

"Throughout our society there tends to be one informal or backstage language of behaviour, and another language of behaviour for occasions when a performance is being presented. The backstage language consists of reciprocal first–naming, co–operative decision–making, profanity, open sexual remarks, elaborate griping, smoking, rough informal dress, ' sloppy' sitting and standing posture, use of dialect or sub–standard speech, mumbling and shouting, playful aggressivity and 'kidding,' inconsiderateness for the other in minor but potentially symbolic acts, minor physical self–involvements such as humming, whistling, chewing, nibbling, belching, and flatulence. The frontstage behaviour language can be taken as the absence (and in some sense the opposite) of this. In general, then, backstage conduct is one which allows minor acts which might easily be taken as symbolic of intimacy and disrespect for others present and for the region, while front region conduct is one which disallows such potentially offensive behaviour." [1]

(Erving Goffman, 1959, p.78)

[1] It may be noted that backstage behaviour has what psychologists might call a 'regressive' character. The question, of course, is whether a backstage gives individuals an opportunity to regress or whether regression, in the clinical sense, is backstage conduct invoked on inappropriate occasions for motives that are not socially approved.

Goffman, E. (1959). "The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life", University of Edinburgh Social Sciences Research Centre.

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TAGS

1959 • appropriated metaphor • backstage • backstage behaviour • backstage conduct • backstage language • belching • chewing • co-operative decision-making • cooperative decision-making • cultural beliefs • cultural normscultural valuesdecision makingdialectdisrespectdisrespect for others • dramatism • dramaturgical analysis • dramaturgical sociology • dramaturgy • dramaturgy (sociology) • elaborate griping • Erving Goffmaneveryday lifeflatulence • front region conduct • frontstage behaviour language • human interactionshummingidentity performance • inconsiderateness • informal behaviour • informal language • Kenneth Burke • kidding • language of behaviour • microsociological accounts • minor acts • minor physical self-involvements • mumbling • nibbling • offensive behaviour • open sexual remarks • playful aggressivity • profanity • reciprocal first-naming • regression • regressive character • rough informal dress • shouting • sloppiness • sloppy sitting • smokingsocial behavioursocial interaction • social occasion • sociological perspective • standing posture • study of social interaction • sub-standard speech • symbolic acts • symbolic behavioursymbolic interactionism • symbolic of intimacy • theatrical metaphor • theatrical performance • whistling

CONTRIBUTOR

Barbara Adkins
23 APRIL 2010

The Wooster Group: new forms and techniques of theatrical expression reflective of and responsive to our evolving culture

"The Wooster Group is an ensemble of artists who, under the direction of Elizabeth LeCompte, make work for theater, dance and media.

For more than thirty years, The Wooster Group has cultivated new forms and techniques of theatrical expression reflective of and responsive to our evolving culture, while sustaining a consistent ensemble and maintaining a flexible repertory. Wooster Group theatre pieces are constructed as assemblages of juxtaposed elements: radical staging of both modern and classic texts, found materials, films and videos, dance and movement, multi–track scoring, and an architectonic approach to theatre design.

The Wooster Group has played a pivotal role in bringing technologically sophisticated and evocative uses of sound, film and video into the realm of contemporary theatre, and in the process has influenced a generation of theatre artists nationally and internationally. The Group's work is unique because it attracts not only the theatre–going community but also artists and enthusiasts of many other cultural disciplines, such as dance, painting, music, video & film."

(The Wooster Group)

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TAGS

architectonic • contemporary theatre • dancedramaturgy • Elizabeth LeCompte • evolving cultureexperimental theatre • found material • movementpaintingperformanceradical staging • repertory • theatretheatrical expressionvideo • Wooster Group

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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