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15 FEBRUARY 2015

Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books Collection Online

"Artists' books are works of art, like paintings or sculptures, but in book form. While book illustration has a much longer history, the book as art object is a product of the 20th century. Some of the early examples were created by Futurists and Dadaists in their politically–motivated pamphlets and magazines, by Fluxus artists in their happenings, and by conceptual artists' in their work to dematerialize the art object. Artists' books can also be unique creations undertaken with extreme care and attention to detail. Some are experimental and done by artists better known as painters or sculptors, as a way to extend their artistic practice. Many artists use the book format to create narratives to deal with difficult issues, with ideas that cannot be conveyed as clearly on a canvas or other medium. Some artist–made books illustrate the words of others, integrating art and literature. And some artists' books do not have words at all. As a work created by an artist, the nature, appearance and purpose, of an artist's book can be fundamentally different from what one might find on the shelves of the library.

Artists' books exist at the intersections of printmaking, photography, poetry, experimental narrative, visual arts, graphic design, and publishing. They have made a place for themselves in the collections of museums, libraries, and private collectors. They have caught the interest of art historians and critics writing about art, and there are numerous studio programs in art schools dedicated to the art of the book, ushering in new generations of artists making books."

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TAGS

20th century • art and literature • art object • artist-made books • artists books • artists making books • Barbara Krugerbook formbook formatbook publishing • cataloguer • cataloguing challenge • Claire Van Vliet • Cooper Hewitt Library • cross-institution collaboration • culture onlineDada • defy easy classification • Dibner Library • diorama • Ed Ruscha • experimental books • FluxusFuturism (art movement) • Georges Adeagbo • graphic designhappenings • Hirshhorn Museum • Ida Applebroog • illustrating the words of others • Joe Freedman • Julie Chen • Kara Walker • Laura Davidson • library catalogue • Luan Nel • museum collectionsnational cultural heritage online • National Museum of African Art • National Portrait Gallery Library • online resource • pamphlets • paper engineering • photographypoetry • politically motivated • pop-up booksprintmaking • Smithsonian American Art Museum • Smithsonian Design Library • Smithsonian LibrariesSol LeWitt • the art of the book • Thomas Parker Williams • unusual physical features • Virginia Flynn • visual arts • Warren M Robbins Library • William Kentridgeworks of artYoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 SEPTEMBER 2014

Umberto Eco: The Virtual Imagination

"But many internet programs suggest that a story is enriched by successive contributions. … This has sometimes happened in the past without disturbing authorship. With the Commedia dell'arte, every performance was different. We cannot identify a single work due to a single author. Another example is a jazz jam session. We may believe there is a privileged performance of 'Basin Street Blues' because a recording survives. But there were as many Basin Street Blues as there were performances. ... There are books that we cannot rewrite because their function is to teach us about Necessity, and only if they are respected as they are can they provide us with such wisdom. Their repressive lesson is indispensable to reach a higher state of intellectual and moral freedom."

(Umberto Eco, 7 November 2000)

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2000authorial signatureauthoritative workauthorship • Basin Street Blues • biographybooks • books-to-be-read • booksellersbookstoresCinderella • closed universe • Commedia dellarte • comprehending languagecomputers • copying machine • e-bookelectronic literatureencyclopaediaend of booksend of print • enriched by successive contributions • every performance is different • evolving formfairy talefatefolioFranz Kafkafuture of the book • god passed over • grammatical rulesheroeshypertexthypertext fiction • hypertextual programme • hypertextual structures • Immanuel Kant • infinite possibilities • infinite texts • intellectual freedom • intellectual needs • jazz jam session • Les Miserables • library catalogue • linear narrative • linearityLittle Red Riding Hoodmanuscripts • moral freedom • Napoleon Bonapartenatural language • necessity • new forms of literacy • obsolete form • open work • Penguin edition • photocopierprint on demand • printed books • printed version • privileged performance • publishing houses • publishing modelreaderly textsreading • reading process • revisionscanningselectionshift to digital • single author • specificity of print • systems and text • tailored consumer experience • texts which can be interpreted in infinite ways • theories of interpretation • tragic beauty • tragic literature • Umberto Eco • unlimited texts • utilitarian value • Victor Hugo • War and Peace • Waterloo • William Shakespeare

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

New Zealand National Library and the Alexander Turnbull Library

"We're in Beta, and we're excited to share this new National Library website with you. Why are we so excited? For the first time you can search right across our collections in one place. It's easier to get what you're after and easier to use it."

(The Aotearoa New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs Te Tari Taiwhenua)

Fig.1 Ref: 1/2–220232–F, Portrait of girl with fan, 1968, photographed by K E Niven & Co of Wellington.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 APRIL 2010

Talis Aspire: shared UK-wide Resource List Management System

"Talis Aspire takes into account the rise of e–content, evolving pedagogy techniques, higher student expectations and user–generated content. Talis are fairly sure that they got the stock management aspect right with Talis List, so they took as the starting point of development the needs of students and academics, as well as the library. Essentially the VLE is still seen as the hub that co–ordinates services, and Aspire is designed to work with existing systems. A lot of academics seem to be using Moodle to provide their course reading, but at present it still mostly consists of links within Moodle to word documents or PDFs. Aspire has been designed to fit in with the look of the institution so that it can work with Moodle without the students necessarily knowing that they have even left Moodle. It integrates with e.g. Shibboleth/Athens and student registries, so that it's possible for students to be presented with the relevant lists as soon as they start a course (rather than having to seek out their lists). One of the goals of Aspire is to maximize the value of e–resources, so in–line content plays a big part–library catalogue information is displayed on the page, and you can embed e.g. e–books, articles and videos within the list. This looked particularly useful so the students can get to content quicker and should help them to access more e–resources. YouTube is easy to embed, but I was pleased that they were currently talking to the BUFVC to see if Box of Broadcasts could be directly embedded."

(Paul Johnson, Royal Holloway, University of London, 23 April 2009)

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academic journals database • BoB (acronym) • Box of Broadcasts • British Universities Film and Video Council • BUFVC • catalogueCMScollectioncontentcontent management systemcontent node • e-content • e-resources • ICTinformationinstitutionlibrarylibrary cataloguelist • management system • MoodleMS Wordonline resource • OpenAthens • pedagogyreading listrepositoryresource • resource database • resource list • Resource List Management Software • Resource List Management System • RLMS • Shibboleth • Talis Aspire • Talis List • technologyUKVLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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