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Which clippings match 'Punch Cards' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 OCTOBER 2015

Calculating Ada The Countess of Computers

"Ada Lovelace was a most unlikely computer pioneer. In this film, Dr Hannah Fry tells the story of Ada's remarkable life. Born in the early 19th century Ada was a countess of the realm, a scandalous socialite and an 'enchantress of numbers'. The film is an enthralling tale of how a life infused with brilliance, but blighted by illness and gambling addiction, helped give rise to the modern era of computing.

Hannah traces Ada's unlikely union with the father of computers, Charles Babbage. Babbage designed the world's first steam-powered computers - most famously the analytical engine - but it was Ada who realised the full potential of these new machines. During her own lifetime Ada was most famous for being the daughter of romantic poet Lord Byron ('mad, bad and dangerous to know'). It was only with the advent of modern computing that Ada's understanding of their flexibility and power (that they could be far more than mere number crunchers) was recognised as truly visionary. Hannah explores how Ada's unique inheritance - poetic imagination and rational logic - made her the ideal prophet of the digital age."

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19th century • Ada Lovelace • analytical engine • BBC Fourcalculator • Charles Babbage • computer age • computer pioneer • computing history • countess • difference engine • difference equations • differential equations • finite-difference methods (FDM) • flexibility and power • Hannah Fry • history of computation • history of computingJacquard loom • Lord Byron • mechanical bird • modern computing • number crunching • numerical methods • pioneering womenpioneers in computer science • poetic imagination • poetical science • punch cards • rational logic • scientific age • steam-powered computer • thinking machines • Victorian engineering • visionarywomen in technologywomen programmers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2015

Soundweaving: playing traditional Hungarian folk embroidery

"At the core of the Soundweaving project is the traditional cross–stitching pattern used in Hungarian folk embroidery transformed into sound by a punch card comb music player. The cross–stitch pattern of holes on the tape in the musical box were punched by the creator, Zsanett Szirmay.

In this case, the punched tape acts as the score. Embroidered shirts and pillows from the Transylvanian Bukovina, and from Kalotaszeg and Hungary served as a basis for the patterns. As part of the transformation, embroidery patterns turned into laser cut textile pieces, and cross–stitched patterns into melodies. Soundweaving equally stimulates all senses, and calls for interaction. The project uses multiple media and communicates on diverse planes, combining the borderlands of folk art, design and music. It belongs to the analogue and digital realms at the same time as the handmade embroidery is translated into laser cut patterns. At the same time, the visual world is presented in audio, or rather the graphic aspect of music gets a role in developing the tunes. Bálint Tárkány–Kovács, folk musician and composer was instrumental in the audio mapping and developing the tunes."

(Rita Mária Halasi, Moholy–Nagy Művészeti Egyetem, 2014)

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2014analogue correspondence • Balint Tarkany-Kovacs • Bucovina • Carpathians • computational aesthetics • cross-stitch pattern • design and music • design student projectembroidered patternsembroidered textiles • embroidery pattern • folk decoration • handicraft • handmade embroidery • Hungarian folk embroidery • Hungary • Kalotaszeg • laser cut patterns • laser cut textile pieces • listening to imagesMA Textile Design • melodies • Moholy-Nagy Muveszeti Egyetem • music boxmusic player • musical box • musical scoreprogrammable device • punch card comb • punch cardspunched-card systemsequencer • Soundweaving project • traditional crafts • traditional handicrafts • Transylvania • Transylvanian Bukovina • Ukrainevisual pattern • weaving pattern • Zsanett Szirmay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2014

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

"The year is 1974, and Arthur C. Clarke is standing inside one of those cavernous computer centers that held the massive machines of the day. ...

He doesn't call it the internet. But he says that even before the dawn of the twenty–first century, the boy's home will include a computer console – something much smaller than those massive machines humming in the background in 1974 – that provides 'all the information he needs for his everyday life: his bank statements, his theater reservations, all the information you need over the course of living in a complex modern society.' ...

'They will make it possible to live really anywhere we like. Any businessman, any executive, could live almost anywhere on Earth and still do his business through a device like this,' he says. 'It means we won't be stuck in cities. We'll live out in the country or wherever we please and still carry on complete interactions with other human beings as well as computers.' Our cities haven't exactly shrunk. But we're certainly able to connect with each other from wherever we might be."

(Cade Metz , March 2013, Wired.com)

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19742001ABC TV (Australia) • Arthur C Clarke • Australian Broadcasting Corporation • computer centre • computer console • connected worldconnectivity • every household • future forecastingfuturisthome computer • household computer • Internetpredicting the futurepunch cards • punch-card reader • science fiction writer • tape drives • translocationWired (magazine)world connectivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2014

Bruce Sterling: afterglow effects and digital detritus

"Cypherpunk writer, journalist and critic Bruce Sterling gives a talk on the future of digital culture and its seedy (geo)politics at the opening ceremony of transmediale 2014 afterglow, January 29,2014. Introduction by Kristoffer Gansing."

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2014 • afterglow • afterglow effects • afterlife of objects • Andy Cameron • Arduinoart production • atemporality • Bruce Sterlingcomputational artscyberpunkcypherpunkdebrisdigital anthropologydigital culturedigital detritusdigital graveyarddigital materialismDIYDragan Espenschiede-waste • electronic frontier • entropyGeocitiesgeopolitical landscapegeopolitics • gold rush • Grateful Deadhackinginternet of things • John Perry Barlow • Kristoffer Gansing • lived condition • means of production • mulch • net artnet.artnetartobsolescenceobsolete ecologiesobsolete technologyOlia Lialinapunch cardsRaspberry Piredundant technology • Richard Barbrook • surveillance • techart • the futureTransmediale festival • Walt Whitman

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
10 FEBRUARY 2014

Western Electric AT&T: early computer graphics

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1968AT and T • Beflicks • Bell Laboratories Flicks • Bell LabsBell Telephone Laboratoriescomputer graphicscomputer history • computer movie • Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two) • digital drawing • digital movie • digital pen • early computer-erahuman speechlight penPrelinger Archivespunch cards • random letters • robotic voice • sheet music • speakingspeechspeech synthesissynthesis machines • synthesized speech • The Incredible Machine (1968) • typewriter

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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