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Which clippings match 'Loom' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 OCTOBER 2012

Loom: Blade Runner style 4K short film by Luke Scott

"He is an acclaimed commercial director who has pushed through his work to step out of the shadow of his father, Ridley Scott. And now Luke Scott is transcending boundaries in video technology with a visually–arresting 20–minute short film, Loom. Shot in coordination with RED Camera, the sci–fi short features Giovanni Ribisi and Jellybean Howie, although cinematographer Dariusz Wolski just might be its star.

The film follows Ribisi's character Tommy – a lab tech who genetically modifies meat and begins a dangerous at–home experiment he struggles to perfect. It ends with a monologue taken from the conclusion of Darwin's Origin of Species, leaving many of the story's questions left unanswered. 'There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved,' says Howie's character.

Visually, Scott – who directs for his father's production company RSA – gives nod to the filmmaker's 1982 classic Blade Runner, shooting the piece in the tone and style of the dystopian thriller. Constructed for 3D, the piece was crafted to test the limits of the colour range and exposure, allowing viewers to see fine details often lost in dark scenes.

RED initially presented Loom at the 2012 National Association of Broadcasters [NAB] Show this past April. The company has since continued to screen the film, and on Wednesday President Jarred Land released it online via REDUSER, with a disclaimer for cinephiles."

(Jennifer Madison, 31 August 2012, Mail Online)

Fig. 1 published on 28 Aug 2012 by ENTV, YouTube

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TAGS

20124K • 4K 3D • 4K projection • bio-ethicsbiotechnologyBlade Runner (1982)Charles Darwincinematographycolour • colour range • commercials director • cultured meat • Dariusz Wolski • diseasedystopian future • dystopian thriller • Epic RED • film exposure • fine detail • genetic manipulation • genetically modified meat • genetics • Giovanni Ribisi • HDin vitro meat • Jellybean Howie • lab tech • laser projector • loom • Loom (film) • Los Angeles Short Fest • Luke Scott • mutant science • NAB (acronym) • National Association of Broadcasters • Origin of Species • RED Camera • RED ONE • REDUSER • Ridley Scott • RSA (production company) • sci-fisci-fi short filmscience-fiction • shmeat • short filmvideo technologyvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 APRIL 2010

The Jacquard loom: automation through stored programmes

"In consequence of the Industrial Revolution, the late 18th century had witnessed a considerable expansion in the automation of processes that had once been the preserve of small groups of highly skilled workers employed in so–called 'cottage industries'. The textile industry was one sphere were industrialisation had rendered obsolete such skills. Whereas, prior to the development of mechanical looms and weaving machines, lengths of fabric had to be woven slowly by hand, the advent of powered tools for carrying out this task meant that quantities of fabric could be mass–produced at a far quicker rate than previously, thereby reducing its expense. There was one area, however, where the new machines could not compete with skilled manual workers: in the generation of cloth containing anything other than a plain (or at best extremely simple) woven pattern. The Jacquard Loom provided a solution to this problem so that, with it in use, extremely intricate patterns and pictures could be automatically woven into cloth at much the same rate as a plain length of fabric could be generated. The key idea behind Jacquard's loom was to control the action of the weaving process by interfacing the behaviour of the loom to an encoding of the pattern to be reproduced. In order to do this Jacquard arranged for the pattern to be depicted as a groups of holes 'punched' into a sequence of pasteboard card. Each card contained the same number of rows and columns, the presence or absence of a hole was detected mechanically and used to determine the actions of the loom. By combining a 'tape' of cards together the Jacquard loom was able to weave (and reproduce) patterns of great complexity, e.g. a surviving example is a black and white silk portrait of Jacquard woven under the control of a 10,000 card 'program'."

(Paul E. Dunne, University of Liverpool)

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TAGS

1801 • 18th centuryanalogue correspondenceautomation • cottage industries • devicefabrichistoryindustrial heritageindustrial revolutionindustrialisationJacquard loom • Joseph Marie Jacquard • loompatternpioneerprogrammable deviceprogrammepunch cardspunched-card systemreproductionsequencesolutiontechnologytextile industrytextilesweave • weaving machine

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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