Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Uncertain Environments' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 FEBRUARY 2013

The Strategic Plan is Dead. Long Live Strategy

"The approach we developed in working with our clients at Monitor Institute is what we call adaptive strategy. We create a roadmap of the terrain that lies before an organization and develop a set of navigational tools, realizing that there will be many different options for reaching the destination. If necessary, the destination itself may shift based on what we learn along the way.

Creating strategies that are truly adaptive requires that we give up on many long–held assumptions. As the complexity of our physical and social systems make the world more unpredictable, we have to abandon our focus on predictions and shift into rapid prototyping and experimentation so that we learn quickly about what actually works. With data now ubiquitous, we have to give up our claim to expertise in data collection and move into pattern recognition so that we know what data is worth our attention. We also know that simple directives from the top are frequently neither necessary nor helpful. We instead find ways to delegate authority, get information directly from the front lines, and make decisions based on a real–time understanding of what's happening on the ground. Instead of the old approach of 'making a plan and sticking to it,' which led to centralized strategic planning around fixed time horizons, we believe in 'setting a direction and testing to it,' treating the whole organization as a team that is experimenting its way to success.

This approach wouldn't surprise anyone in the world of current military strategy. Recent generations of military thinkers have long since moved beyond the traditional approach, most notably famed fighter pilot John Boyd. He saw strategy as a continuous mental loop that ran from observe to orient to decide and finally to act, returning immediately to further observation. By adopting his mindset (with a particular emphasis on the two O's, given our turbulent context), we can get much better at making strategy a self–correcting series of intentional experiments.

To provide structure to this fluid approach, we focus on answering a series of four interrelated questions about the organization's strategic direction: what vision you want to pursue, how you will make a difference, how you will succeed, and what capabilities it will take to get there.

The skills and mindset for today's strategic planning will come from continuously asking ourselves these questions about our organizations, programs, and initiatives. Once we accept Dwight D. Eisenhower's sage advice that 'Plans are useless, but planning is everything,' we will be ready to adapt to whatever curveballs the twenty–first century sees fit to throw."

(Dana O'Donovan & Noah Rimland Flower, 10 Jan 2013, Stanford Social Innovation Review)

1

TAGS

adapting to changeadaptive approach • adaptive strategy • becomingcentralisation • continuous mental loop • data is ubiquitous • decision makingDwight Eisenhower • evolving trajectory • experimentation • experimenting to success • fixed time horizons • fluid approach • John Boyd • military strategy • military thinkers • Monitor Institute • navigational tools • pattern recognitionplanning • plans are useless • predictionsrapid prototyping • real-time understanding • roadmap • shifting destinations • strategic directionstrategic planningtactical engagementturbulent contextuncertain environmentsunpredictability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2012

Ars Electronica Festival: New Concepts for a New World

"THE BIG PICTURE is the theme of the [August 30 to September 3] 2012 Ars Electronica Festival ... Occupying the focal point is the effort to identify all–encompassing images that capture the world that's coming to be, Big Pictures that do justice to the progressive globalization and interrelatedness of our world, ones that capture its contradictions and flaws as well as ways in which people are coming together. By showcasing inspiring best–practice examples from art and science, this year's festival is a call for a new, open–minded way of considering the development of a viable vision of our future – how such a Big Picture ought to be composed and how it might become reality."

(Ars Electronica Festival, 2012)

Fig.1 work of Seiko Mikami "Desire of Codes"

1

TAGS

2012Ars ElectronicaArs Electronica Festivalart and sciencebecoming • best practice examples • big picturesbrave new world • coming to be • coming togethercontradiction and changecultural transformationgenius of the individualglobal crisis • global political stage • global vision • global warmingglobalisationglobalised world • hesitation • humankind • interrelatedness • isolationism • it will be OK • junk heap • media art • media art festival • natural sciences • necessary changes • networked world • new epoch • open-minded • our future • overspecialised nerd • progressive globalisation • reflexive modernisation • scientific expert • scientific insightssocial changesocial networks • team player • The Big Picture • the futurethresholdturbulenceuncertain environmentsuncertainty • universal genius • visions of the futureworld politics • world religions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2010

Organisational Behaviour and Development

"Organizational studies is a fragmented field. Its foundations are the disciplines of Psychology, Sociology, and Economics and applied fields such as Industrial Psychology, Labor Relations, Human Resource Management, Organization Development and Management. Each field of inquiry focuses on different phenomena, employs different research methods and makes different assumptions about the nature of people and about organizations and their purpose in society. This diversity has prevented the emergence of a common language or theory of organizations (Pfeffer, 1997). ...

Lawrence and Lorsch (1967), for example, found that high performing companies in uncertain environments differed from high performing companies in certain environments in their structure and mode of conflict resolution. The former were characterized by horizontal team structures that facilitate coordination across functional departments and by an openness to constructive conflict."

(Michael Beer, 1998)

[1] Beer, Michael. "Organizational Behavior and Development." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 98–115, 1998.

Pfeffer, J. (1998). The human equation. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. Lawrence, P. R., & Lorsch, J. (1967).

Lawrence, P. R., & Lorsch, J. (1967). . Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

TAGS

1998agencyautonomychangecollaboration • conflict resolution • constructive conflict • economic changeeconomicsengagement • functional departments • high performing companies • horizontal organisation • human resource management • industrial psychology • labour relations • Michael Beer • openness • organisation development and management • organisational behaviourorganisations • organizational studies • participationperformancepsychology • purpose in society • research methodssocial interactionsociologystructure • team structures • theory of organisations • transformationuncertain environments

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.