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10 DECEMBER 2011

Zoontechnica Journal redirective design futures

"A variety of designers and researchers address issues of concern to contemporary design thinking in this first issue1 of Zoontechnica (not counting the pre–issue, now archived). All grapple with questions about how design can, in more substantial ways, contribute to sustaining those things that need to be sustained, like social justice, equity, diversity and critical thinking. ...

It is now widely acknowledged that design has played a central role in creating and sustaining cultures of consumption that continue to use up resources, burn fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases that lead to climate change, and so on. What's less recognized is that these are not just biophysical problems to be solved by technologies, but that the unsustainable is often that which is closest to us, the everyday world in which we feel comfortable, secure and accommodated (herein lies a dilemma for user–centred design–what to do about user needs/desires that clearly contribute to unsustainability?). Being–in–the–world is being with designed things, structures and spaces that design our modes of being. Sometimes this is obvious, 'the designed' declaring itself as such,but mostly, the designed nature of our worlds is invisible to us, and when everything is working as it should, we feel at ease. We shouldn't. So much of what functions seamlessly now, saves time, delivers convenience, gives pleasure, etc– is actually taking futures away."

(Anne–Marie Willis, November 2011)

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TAGS

academic journal • Anne-Marie Willis • anthropometrics • being-in-the-world • biophysical • Brunel University • Chris McGinley • climate changeconsumptionconveniencecritical thinking • cultures of consumption • Daniel Sobol • designdesign futuresdesign thinkingdesigned spacesdesigned things • Donald Welch • Emmanuel Levinas • environmental change • equity • ethicseverydayfossil fuelgreenhouse gases • Griffith University • human factorshuman-centred design • Jason Robertson • Jennifer Loy • Marc Steen • modes of being • Nada Filipovic • our world • QCA Griffith University • Queensland College of Art • redesign • redirective • reflexive practice • RMIT • Robert Macredie • social changesocial justicesustainability • the designed • time savingTony Fry • unsustainability • unsustainableuser needsUser-Centred Design (UCD) • Zoontechnica

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Dyson: new ways of doing the familiar

"New ideas are the lifeblood of Dyson. Every year, we invest half our profits back into harnessing them at our research and development laboratory in Wiltshire. There are 350 engineers and scientists based there. Thinking, testing, breaking, questioning.

They're a varied bunch, too. Many are design engineers developing new ideas and technology. Then there are specialists who test and improve different aspects of each machine, from the way they sound to what they pick up. Some will have years of experience. Others are fresh out of universities like the Royal College of Art, Brunel or Loughborough."

(Dyson Limited, UK)

Fig.1 Sean Poulter (15th September 2011). "Sci–fi: The bladeless fan heater quickly warms an entire room without any visible moving parts" [http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article–2037565/Get–hot–Dyson–unveils–new–heater–warms–room–using–jet–engine–technology.html], Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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TAGS

applied research • breaking • Brunel University • design and development • design engineers • Dyson • Dyson Air Multiplier • engineersentrepreneurshipeverydayimagineeringinnovationknowledge-based economyLoughborough Universitymachinenew ideasnew technologyquestioningresearch labRoyal College of ArttestingthinkingUK • Wiltshire

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Show or tell? Opportunities, problems and methods of the exhibition as a form of research dissemination

"The European Academy of Design took a pioneering step in their 1999 biennial conference by including an exhibition of 'practice–based research'. This was refereed in the same way as conventional papers and a number of interesting exhibits were produced, demonstrating a diversity of work and connections between the methods and aims of the exhibitors and those of conventionally published research. In fact the conference award for 'best paper' (on a vote by all delegates) went to one of the exhibitors. Unfortunately the EAD exhibition did not result in a permanent record of the research thus 'published' so the exhibits did not contribute to the recorded body of knowledge and provided no exemplars for future researchers.

A further problem with the EAD exhibition, held in England, was that all the exhibits originated in the UK. Given the difficulty of transporting exhibition materials over long distances, it was reasonable to assume that the format inhibited international contributions and this was reinforced at the 2001 EAD conference in Portugal where exhibits were invited but only one was forthcoming (a graphic design exhibit from Australia) possibly because the ideas of practice–based research were less prevalent in the host country.

Against this background, the Design Research Society decided to include an exhibition in their 2002 Conference, 'Common Ground', held at Brunel University in England. This was an experimental activity and there was uncertainty about whether suitable research exhibits would be forthcoming, how to referee them and how to provide a permanent record. However it was felt that this experiment needed to go further than the preceding EAD venture and make a permanent contribution to our understanding of this form of dissemination. "

(Chris Rust and Alec Robertson, 2003)

1). RUST, C. and ROBERTSON, A. (2003). Show or tell? Opportunities, problems and methods of the exhibition as a form of research dissemination. In: Proceedings of 5th European Academy of Design Conference, Barcelona, April 2003.

TAGS

199920012002 • Alec Robertson • artistic practiceBrunel University • Chris Rust • conferencecontribution to knowledgecreative practiceDesign Research SocietydisseminationEADenquiryEuropean Academy of Designexhibition • experimental activity • future researchers • international contributions • permanent contribution • permanent record • pioneeringPortugalpractice-based research • published • published research • recorded body of knowledge • refereed • research • research exhibits • research outputSHURAUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2010

DAP-Lab: cross-media performance lab

"DAP–Lab is a cross–media lab exploring convergences between performance, telematics, textile/fashion design and movement, clothing and choreography, visual expression, film/photography, and interactive design.

Founded in 2004, the Lab is now housed at Brunel University and continues research partnerships with multiple sites in the USA, Japan, and Brasil which have formed the ADaPT network on performance telematics since 2000. DAP–Lab also connects ongoing research investigations and productions in dance (Digital Cultures) with performance/science collaborations (TransNet), and brings these partnerships into knowledge transfer with performance, multimedia and electronics engineering research at Brunel University's School of Arts and School of Engineering and Design."

(Johannes Birringer)

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TAGS

20002004 • ADaPT network on performance telematics • Brasil • BrazilBrunel University • Brunel University School of Engineering and Design • choreographyclothing • cross-media lab • dance • DAP-Lab • digital culture • electronics engineering research at Brunel University School of Arts • fashion designfilminteractive designJapan • Johannes Birringer • knowledge transfermovementmultimediaperformanceperformance researchphotographyresearchsciencetelematicstextiles • TransNet • UK • visual expression

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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