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Which clippings match 'Interactive Art' keyword pg.1 of 3
10 JUNE 2015

PomPom Mirror: a camera-based interaction artwork

"Rozin's anthropomorphic PomPom Mirror features a synchronized array of 928 spherical faux fur puffs. Organized into a three-dimensional grid of beige and black, the sculpture is controlled by hundreds of motors that build silhouettes of viewers using computer-vision. Along its surface, figures appear as fluffy animal-like representations within the picture plane, which is made permeable by a 'push-pull' forward and backward motion of meshed 'pixels'. Ghostly traces fade and emerge, as the motorized composition hums in unified movement, seemingly alive and breathing as a body of its own."

Daniel Rozin, "PomPom Mirror", 2015, 928 faux fur pom poms, 464 motors, control electronics, video camera, custom software, microcontroller, wooden armature, 48 x 48 x 18 in / 121.9 x 121.9 x 45.7 cm

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2015aesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleanalogue correspondenceanthropomorphismartwork • beige and black • Bitforms Gallery • black and whitecamera-based interactioncomputer based interactive artcomputer visionDaniel Rozindynamic visual representationdynamically changing • fade and emerge • faux fur • fur • ghostly traces • image processing • implied tactile experience • implied texture • interactive artinteractive artworkinteractive visualisationkinetic art • mechanical mirror • microcontrollermicrosoft kinect cameramirror • moving tiles • NYCperceptual organisation • physical pixels • pom pom • PomPom Mirror (2015) • puff • push-pull • real-time motion • surface quality • synchronised array • tessellationtexturetransposing materials • unified movement • Victoria Sendra • visual appearance • visual feedback

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2014

Jean Tinguely: Art, Machines and Motion

"Jean Tinguely exhibited in a show titled 'Art, Machines and Motion' at the Kaplan Gallery, London, in November 1959. In conjunction with that exhibition, Tinguely held a conference and performance at the Institute of Contemporary Art on November 16 titled 'Static, Static, Static! Be Static!' During the event, 1.5 km of paper drawn by two cyclists on his meta–matic bicycle were spread through the audience while Tinguely read his theory of movement and machines simultaneously heard on radio in Paris."

(Rosemary O'Neill, p.159)

Rosemary O'Neill (2011). Total Art and Fluxus in Nice. "Art and Visual Culture on the French Riviera, 1956–1971: The Ecole De Nice", Ashgate Publishing Limited.

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1959abstract artanarchicart exhibition • Art Machines and Motion (exhibition) • auto-generateavant-garde artistsbicycleBritish Pathecontraptiondo-it-yourself • Ewan Phillips • generative artgenerative compositional techniqueInstitute of Contemporary Artsinteractive artironicJean Tinguely • Kaplan Gallery • kinetic sculptureLondonmachine aestheticmachinesmechanical device • meta-matic bicycle • meta-maticsmid 20th-centurymotion • movement and machines • moving machinesnewsreel • Nouveau Realistes • paperParisplayfulradiorobot artrobotised assemblagessculptorsculpture • speed sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2013

ArtUp! Media Art in Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey

"ArtUP! is a multilingual portal for media art in Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey expresses the diversity of media art outlines current trends in and around media art fuels discussion about society processes and posts information about media art presents artists links up artists presents media artworks curates exhibitions initiates workshops ArtUP! is a project of the Goethe–Instituts in Ankara, Athens and Sofia."

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2013 • abstract fields • Adelina Popnedeleva • Afroditi Psarra • Albena Baeva • Ali Mahmut Demirel • Ali Miharbi • Alper Sen • Andreas Sitorengo • Angeliki Avgitidou • Angelo Plessas • Anna Lascari • Artemis Papageorgiou • ArtUP • artwork • Babis Venetopoulos • Bill Balaskas • Bill Psarras • Borjana Ventzislavova • Boryana Rossa • Boyan Dobrev • Bulgaria • Bulgarian media art • Burak Arikan • Can Altay • Candas Sisman • Caterina Antonopoulou • Costantino Luca Rolando Kiriakos • Cvetan Krastev • Daniela Kostova • Dimitris Charitos • Dimitris Fotiou • Ergin Cavusoglu • Erkan Ozgen • Esra Ersen • exhibition • Ferhat Ozgur • Genco Gulan • George Drivas • George Ruzhev • Goethe-InstitutGreece • Greek media art • Guven Incirlioglu • Hakan Akcura • Hakan Topal • HR-Stamenov • installation artinteractive art • Ioanna Myrka • Isil Egrikavuk • Iv Toshain • Ivan Moudov • Ivo Ivanov • Jenny Marketou • Kalin Serapionov • Kamen Stoyanov • Kiril Kuzmanov • Kleoni Manoussakis • Koken Ergun • Konstantinos Tiligadis • Koray Tahiroglu • Kosta Tonev • Kostas Daflos • Krassimir Krastev • Krassimir Terziev • Levent Kunt • Lina Theodorou • Luchezar Boyadjiev • Makis Faros • Maria Lalou • Maria Paschalidou • Maria Varela • Mariana Vassileva • Marianne Strapatsakis • Marinos Koutsomichalis • Medea Electronique • media art • Nadezhda Oleg Lyahova • Nancy Atakan • Neno Belchev • Neriman Polat • net artnew media art • new media art exhibition • Nezaket Ekici • Nil Yalter • NINA Kovacheva • Oktay Ince • Oleg Mavromatti • Panagiotis Tomaras • Panayiotis Kokoras • Panos Kouros • Pegy Zali • performance art • personal cinema • Petko Dourmana • Petros Moris • Rada Boukova • Raycho Stanev • rural spaces • Samuil Stoyanov • Sener Ozmen • Sibin Vassilev • Simge Hough • sound art • Stanimir Genov • Stefan Nikolaev • Svetlana Mircheva • The Erasers • Theodoros Giannakis • TurkeyTurkish media art • Tzeni Argyriou • urban spaces • Valentin Stefanoff • Vasilys Bouzas • Venelin Shurelov • Ventsislav Zankov • video artvirtual spacesvisual art organisation • Vladimir Mitrev • Volkan Senozan • Yiannis Melanitis • Zeyno Pekun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 DECEMBER 2012

The Art & Media Course at Tama Art University in Japan

"Art & Media Course in Information Design Department of Tama Art University manages various kinds of art forms by utilizing digital technologies and bio medias, such like interactive installations, audio & visual performances, software arts, bio arts, digital animations, and future cinemas. Through the background of recent dynamic changes of relationship between technology and human society, we aim to bring up new types of multi–skilled creators who can transcend the traditional boundaries of fine arts, science, engineering, mathematics and philosophy.The Course has established unique creative environment configured by four individual laboratories which has their own research themes."

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applied media arts • art and culture • Art and Media Course in Information Design Department • art forms • art history • art media • art theorybio artbio data • bio media art • CGIcommunication designcommunication design education • communications networks • community arts • craft and materials • creative cinema • cultural and social relations • Department of Information Design • design coursedesign managementdesign theory • digital animation • digital architecturedigital technologiesdrawing • Faculty of Fine Arts • fine art • future cinema • future phenomenology • human interfaces • IDDlab • information and society • information design • information networks • information without form • integrated media arts • interaction designinteractive artinterdisciplinary workingJapankinetic artmedia arts • media design history • media design theory • media information literacy • multi-skilled creatorsnew craftsperforming arts • social network theory • software artsound art • Tama Art University • technology and human societytime-based artvideo artvideo mediavisual literacyvisual media • write objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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