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22 NOVEMBER 2016

Wander through a Garden of Earthly Delights on loop

'Paradise' was commissioned by the MOTI Museum in The Netherlands for the exhibition New Delights, which is part of the Hieronymus Bosch 500-year anniversary. A gigantic video installation of this work is exhibited in the Museum until the 31st of December 2016.

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TAGS

1490 • 20163D animation4K • 500 year anniversary • animated experience • animated interpretation • animated paintinganniversarycarnivalesquechickencoming to lifeconsumerismcontemporary interpretationcontinuous scenecreaturesdecadence • digitally recreated • Dutch animation • Dutch art • Dutch master • eroticismescapism • famous painting • hallucinatoryHello KittyHieronymus Boschlandscapelarge scale installationliving paintingliving picturesmedieval art • medieval painting • metaphors for our society • MOTI Museum • Netherlandspaintingpanoramic portrayalpenisselfishness • spybot • Studio Smack • synthetic fresco • The Garden of Earthly Delights • triptychvanityvideo installationvideo mural

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2015

Passive digital experience forms backdrop to annual trade convention

"Working with with illustrator and Art Director Katie Scott, we created an unique 15m x 3.5m animated wallpaper that slowly evolved over a 4 hour period. Created for Pernod Ricards' annual creative meeting on the private island of Embiez in the south of France and installed by Paris based Events agency Auditoire. The installation became a passive digital experience that functioned as a thought provoking backdrop to the schedule of creative speakers. Using 'Foley' artist Michael to create the audio effect and Lewis and myself to create the animation we were able to take Katie's illustration into an animated form, and her unique world became an animated experience."

(Christopher Pearson)

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20132D animation • advertising convention • aesthetic spectacleambient artanatomiesanimal physiologyanimated experienceanimated painting • animated wallpaper • annual convention • Auditoire (events agency) • backdropbiomedical illustration • Christopher Pearson • corporate events • creative meeting • Embiez • energizing corporate cultureevents design • experiential advertising • foley artist • immersive experience • Katie Scott • large scale installation • Lewis White • Michael Floyd • passive digital experience • Pernod Ricard • physiologyphytotomyplant anatomy • private island • sceneryscientific illustrationsouth of Francetrade conventionvideo muralvisual spectaclewomen illustrators

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

River of Wisdom: animated version of a Song Dynasty painting

"After debuting at the Expo 2010 Shanghai China (2010上海世界博覽會) and traveling to Hong Kong and Macau, an animated version of the Song Dynasty painting Along the River During the Qingming Festival (清明上河圖), by 12th–century artist Zhang Zeduan (張澤端), is on show in Taipei. The 25cm by 529cm original is a panoramic portrayal of everyday life in Bianjing (汴京), today's Kaifeng (開封), the capital of China during the Song Dynasty. Despite its name, the scroll depicts the architecture and scenery of the period and the apparel and activities of the rich and poor, not the rituals of the Qingming Festival (清明節), otherwise known as Tomb Sweeping Festival. Thirty times larger than the original painting, the animated version, which is titled River of Wisdom, is beamed onto a 6m by 110m screen by 12 projectors. The entire work was digitalized by Crystal CG (水晶石數字科技公司) and its subjects and backdrops move and make sounds."

(Lin King, 29 July 2011, Taipei Times)

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12th century20103D animation • Along the River During • animatedanimated experienceanimated paintinganimation • apparel • Beijing • Bianjing • Chinesecontinuous scene • Crystal CG • everyday life • Expo 2010 • flat picture planeflat spaceHong Kongimmersive experience • Kaifeng • large scale installation • life-size replica • living paintingliving pictures • Macau • Ming Dynasty • painting • Palace Museum • panoramapanoramic portrayal • Qing court • Qingming Festival • Qingyuan • Qiu Ying • remediation • rich and poor • ritual • River of Wisdom • sceneryscrollShanghai • Song Dynasty • Taipei • Taipei Times • Tomb Sweeping Festival • video muralvirtual heritage • Zhang Zeduan

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
21 MARCH 2010

Marco Brambilla: Civilization

"When [Marco Brambilla] asked us to work with him on Civilization, a vision he had of taking hundreds of stock footage, movie footage and original clips and combining them to create a moving landscape depicting the ascension from hell to heaven, we knew that it was going to be huge challenge but one we were very excited about....

The project had two huge challenges. Firstly we needed to figure out how to create content that could move with the elevator where it would ultimately be viewed. The idea was this, when you go up in the elevator the content goes down and when you go down it goes up. Not unlike a ride film this project was designed to be synced to the moving environment of the hotel elevators in New York. We wanted to synchronize the footage to the movement of the elevator as best as we could.

The second challenge was creative. What are we seeing through this 'elevator window'? We only really knew at the beginning that the canvas or environment would be very tall and skinny due to the physics of elevator travel and we wanted to go from a hellish landscape to a heavenly one.

We began with exploring the idea of using a game engine to house the project. Seemed easy, map footage onto planes in space, attach a PC to the elevator and we can move up and down in the game environment all day. Unfortunately, once we started to collage the clips together in the Flame we knew the game engine idea wouldn't fly. We approximated that we would have 250 looped HD clips in the environment and our Flame could barely handle it (in the end it was closer to 500 looping clips). We compromised by locking ourselves into the idea that we would create a huge vertical canvas that we would scan up and down on once the elevator was in motion. The final piece was approximately 1920 x 7500 pixels.

Another technical wrinkle was more human. Would we create motion sickness by subjecting riders on the elevator to the video art? To test this we shot some footage of a rising and falling landscape on a glass enclosed elevator and played back the footage on a 42inch plasma in a fully enclosed elevator. Not one person in the 30 we used in the test got sick so we knew our gut check was all right.

In parallel to the technical research, Marco and his studio staff began the process of researching and collecting a vast amount of footage sampled from both mainstream and more obscure film sources. Marco then assembled still grabs from each piece of sampled footage into photomontages, which we would review weekly while Marco's editor cut together a linear chronology of what the components in journey from hell to heaven may look like.

The logistical task of collecting and cataloguing all the clips involved a great deal of coordination between our producer and Marco's studio and stretched over a period of almost three months. Once the material was imported into Flame we would invariably make adjustments and receive more photo–collages that would polish to make the 'video mural' look as seamless as possible. The clips were used in much the same way the way a painter would use a colour or texture. We felt it was like audio sampling, using the clips as beats and timing them all to work together to create something new and original. Marco and our team experimented in the Flame and played with the clips for about six weeks, arranging and rearranging them on the 2d canvas over and over to find the right compositions. Most of this work was done at night because we couldn't afford to do it during prime time hours.

Not only were we playing with where on this huge canvas the clips should go, we had to consider the looping aspect of this project. We wanted the canvas to loop once it got to the top of heaven and come right back around to hell again. Once the canvas looped, each of the 500 clips had to be looped individually as well. Along with colour correction, each clip required careful vari–speeding and stabilization to allow all the pieces fit together. We ping–ponged most of the clips as to avoid any cutting on the loop points. With all the clips treated and placed into the canvas we color corrected the entire thing as one big piece of wallpaper. We had over a hundred 'power windows' on the piece to isolate sections and make each station gel together. We ended up with six main stations on the canvas. Hell, lower purgatory, middle purgatory, upper purgatory, heaven and upper heave/lower hell which was the loop point.

After all this was done we set out to redo the entire piece in 3d space! We took each station, rendered it out as a static 2.5 minute plates and then projected those onto geometry modeled to match the stations layout. We then had to go in and render the stations with and without most of their elements so we could achieve the proper parallax. Essentially it was like recreating the entire project over again but with most of the guesswork taken away with the 2d final as our road map."

(Motionographer)

Credits: Title: Civilization (MEGAPLEX), 2008 By: Marco Brambilla; Client: The Standard Hotel, New York; Editor/Research Assistant: Beau Dickson; Assistant: Swapna Tamhane; Production Company: Crush, Toronto; Representation/Images Courtesy of: Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; Marco Brambilla Directorial Representation: The Ebeling Group; Ebeling Group U.S.A.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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