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21 JUNE 2014

Nothing Lasts Forever: a low budget parody about a struggling artist

"Writer–director Schiller is best known for his short films from the early days of SNL and in 1984, together with producer Lorne Michaels, concocted this imaginative fantasy–comedy about true love, bad art, magical hobos, Carnegie Hall and space travel. Sweet, absurd and crammed with an incredible cast and countless hilarious moments of inspired brilliance, it was never released and never found the cult–audience it so rightfully deserved."

(Zack Carlson, 16 December 2012)

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TAGS

1984 • Alles Ist Verganglich (1984) • anti-consumerist • Apollonia Van Ravenstein • art test • artistauthoritarianism • becoming an artist • Bill Murrayblack and whiteblack humourbus • Calvert Deforest • Carnegie Hallconceptual artcult film • Dan Aykroyd • dream sequence • Eddie Fisher • forgotten works • Holland Tunnel • Imogene Coca • kindness • Lauren Tom • Lawrence Tierney • Lorne Michaels • low budgetManhattan • Marc Alderman • melange • menial job • moon • Mort Sahl • New YorkNew York City • Nothing Lasts Forever (1984) • Odessa Stepsparodypasticheperformance art • Port Authority • repurposingromantic notion of the artist • Sam Jaffe • Saturday Night Livespace travel • starving artist • stock footage • struggling artist • Tom Schiller • tramp • treadmill • underground culture • unreleased films • Zach Galligan

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2013

Isidore Isou's influential Venom and Eternity

"This experimental film ('Venom and Eternity') by Isidore Isou constitutes the Letterist manifesto of film. Rejecting film conventions by 'chiseling' away at them, Isou introduced several new concepts, including discrepancy cinema where the sound track has nothing to do with the visual track. In addition, the celluloid itself was attacked with destructive techniques such as scratches and washing it in bleach. Causing a scandal at the 1951 Cannes Film Festival, this film was later introduced in the United States where it influenced avant–garde film makers such as Stan Brakhage."

(Internet Archive)

Fig.1 Isidore Isou (1951). Traité de bave et d'éternité. Venom And Eternity.

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TAGS

1951 • anarchism • artistic expressionavant-garde cinemaavant-garde film maker • bleach • celluloidcinema • cinema is dead • cinematic conventionsconventionsdeath of cinemadeath of the authordeface • destructive techniques • discrepancy cinema • Eric Rohmer • experimental filmformal workformalismGuy Debord • influential practitioners • influential worksInternet Archive • Isidore Isou • Jean Cocteau • letterist manifesto • lettrism • lettrist movement • Maurice Scherer • rejectionRomanian • Romanian filmmaker • scratches • situationism • situationistStan Brakhagestock footagesync sound • Venom and Eternity (1951)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2010

Marco Brambilla: Civilization

"When [Marco Brambilla] asked us to work with him on Civilization, a vision he had of taking hundreds of stock footage, movie footage and original clips and combining them to create a moving landscape depicting the ascension from hell to heaven, we knew that it was going to be huge challenge but one we were very excited about....

The project had two huge challenges. Firstly we needed to figure out how to create content that could move with the elevator where it would ultimately be viewed. The idea was this, when you go up in the elevator the content goes down and when you go down it goes up. Not unlike a ride film this project was designed to be synced to the moving environment of the hotel elevators in New York. We wanted to synchronize the footage to the movement of the elevator as best as we could.

The second challenge was creative. What are we seeing through this 'elevator window'? We only really knew at the beginning that the canvas or environment would be very tall and skinny due to the physics of elevator travel and we wanted to go from a hellish landscape to a heavenly one.

We began with exploring the idea of using a game engine to house the project. Seemed easy, map footage onto planes in space, attach a PC to the elevator and we can move up and down in the game environment all day. Unfortunately, once we started to collage the clips together in the Flame we knew the game engine idea wouldn't fly. We approximated that we would have 250 looped HD clips in the environment and our Flame could barely handle it (in the end it was closer to 500 looping clips). We compromised by locking ourselves into the idea that we would create a huge vertical canvas that we would scan up and down on once the elevator was in motion. The final piece was approximately 1920 x 7500 pixels.

Another technical wrinkle was more human. Would we create motion sickness by subjecting riders on the elevator to the video art? To test this we shot some footage of a rising and falling landscape on a glass enclosed elevator and played back the footage on a 42inch plasma in a fully enclosed elevator. Not one person in the 30 we used in the test got sick so we knew our gut check was all right.

In parallel to the technical research, Marco and his studio staff began the process of researching and collecting a vast amount of footage sampled from both mainstream and more obscure film sources. Marco then assembled still grabs from each piece of sampled footage into photomontages, which we would review weekly while Marco's editor cut together a linear chronology of what the components in journey from hell to heaven may look like.

The logistical task of collecting and cataloguing all the clips involved a great deal of coordination between our producer and Marco's studio and stretched over a period of almost three months. Once the material was imported into Flame we would invariably make adjustments and receive more photo–collages that would polish to make the 'video mural' look as seamless as possible. The clips were used in much the same way the way a painter would use a colour or texture. We felt it was like audio sampling, using the clips as beats and timing them all to work together to create something new and original. Marco and our team experimented in the Flame and played with the clips for about six weeks, arranging and rearranging them on the 2d canvas over and over to find the right compositions. Most of this work was done at night because we couldn't afford to do it during prime time hours.

Not only were we playing with where on this huge canvas the clips should go, we had to consider the looping aspect of this project. We wanted the canvas to loop once it got to the top of heaven and come right back around to hell again. Once the canvas looped, each of the 500 clips had to be looped individually as well. Along with colour correction, each clip required careful vari–speeding and stabilization to allow all the pieces fit together. We ping–ponged most of the clips as to avoid any cutting on the loop points. With all the clips treated and placed into the canvas we color corrected the entire thing as one big piece of wallpaper. We had over a hundred 'power windows' on the piece to isolate sections and make each station gel together. We ended up with six main stations on the canvas. Hell, lower purgatory, middle purgatory, upper purgatory, heaven and upper heave/lower hell which was the loop point.

After all this was done we set out to redo the entire piece in 3d space! We took each station, rendered it out as a static 2.5 minute plates and then projected those onto geometry modeled to match the stations layout. We then had to go in and render the stations with and without most of their elements so we could achieve the proper parallax. Essentially it was like recreating the entire project over again but with most of the guesswork taken away with the 2d final as our road map."

(Motionographer)

Credits: Title: Civilization (MEGAPLEX), 2008 By: Marco Brambilla; Client: The Standard Hotel, New York; Editor/Research Assistant: Beau Dickson; Assistant: Swapna Tamhane; Production Company: Crush, Toronto; Representation/Images Courtesy of: Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; Marco Brambilla Directorial Representation: The Ebeling Group; Ebeling Group U.S.A.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Deleuzian Memory of Sans Soleil

"Deleuze's notion of time–image cinema describes a revolutionary and political cinema. To understand time–image cinema, we must contrast it with movement–image cinema, 'in which frame follows frame according to necessities of action, subordinating time to movement.'1 Clearly, Sans Soleil is nothing like movement–image cinema. The film has no action or plot that could subordinate time; instead, Marker claims that the only qualification these images have for being included in the film is that they quicken the heart. These images span many different time periods from World War II to the present, and a scene is just as likely to cut to West Africa or San Francisco as it is to cut to a different angle within the same room. In the film, an unnamed and unseen narrator reads the fictitious letters of Sandor Krasna, a traveling cameraman (a thinly–veiled alter–ego for Marker)."

(B.C. Holmes)

TAGS

16mm • Alexandra Stewart • Anne-Marie L Hote • Antoine Bonfanti • Arielle Dombasle • authorial intrusion • Bajazet (1672) • Beaulieu (camera) • Catherine Adda • Charlotte Kerr • Chris Markercinema • Daniele Tessier • Eugenio Bentivoglio • fictitiousness • Florence Delay • Gilles Deleuze • global histories • Guinea-Bissau • Haroun Tazieff • Hayao Yamaneko • human memory • IcelandJames StewartJapan • Jean Racine • Jean-Michel Humeau • Judy Burton • Kasabian (band) • Kim NovakLa Jeteeletters • Madeleine Elster • Mario Marret • meditation • Modest Mussorgsky • movement-imagenarrationnarratorParis • Paul Bertault • personal histories • Pierre Camus • Riyoko Ikeda • San Francisco • Sana Na N hada • Sandor KrasnaSans Soleil (1983) • Spectron video synthesizer • Stalker (1979)stock footageThomas Stearns Eliottime-imagetravelogueVertigo (1958)video synthesizerWorld War II
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