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Which clippings match '1939' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JULY 2013

Futuristic fashions: Eve, A.D. 2000!

"Futuristic fashions 1939 style include a dress that can be adapted for day or evening wear, complete with sun–visor (and African–American maid), and a dress made of transparent net with a towering 60s–style hairdo (wouldn't look out of place on a millennium catwalk). The next two outfits are pretty transparent too; then a bridal gown with a cellophane veil and another adaptable dress.

The suit for the man of 2000 looks like a boiler suit with wide chain mail over the top. A circular aerial is worn on the head, to pick up signals for his mobile phone and radio. He also has two natty silver boxes attached to his belt 'for coins, keys and candy for cuties'. The beard is marcel–waved and he has buns of hair at the side of his head. Not a particularly manly look!"

(British Pathé)

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TAGS

1930s19392000 • 2000 AD • adaptable dress • aerial • African-American • beard • boiler suit • bridal gownBritish Pathe • candy for cuties • catwalkcellophane • chain mail • clothing • day wear • dress • Eve • evening wear • fashion designfashion forecastingfuture forecastingfuturistic design • futuristic fashions • futuristic visionhair • hairdo • maid • manly look • millenniummobile phone • natty • newsreel • outfit • Pathetone Weekly • portable radio • predictionretrofuturismstylesuit • sun visor • transparencyveilwomens clothingwomenswear

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2010

The Tailenders: missionary activity and global capitalism

"The Tailenders explores the connections between missionary activity and global capitalism. The Tailenders examines a missionary organization's use of ultra–low–tech audio devices to evangelize indigenous communities facing crises caused by global economic forces.

Joy Ridderhoff founded Gospel Recordings in 1939 in Los Angeles. She remembered how crowds had gathered around gramophones in the Honduran villages where she had worked as a missionary, and decided that rather than compete with this medium, she would use it to preach. The organization that she founded has now produced audio recordings of Bible stories in over 5,000 languages, and aims to record in every language on earth. They distribute these recordings along with hand–wind players in regions with limited access to electricity and media. The Bible stories played by the missionaries are sometimes the first encounter community members have had with recorded sound, and, even more frequently, the first time they have heard their own language recorded. Gospel Recordings calls their target audience 'the Tailenders' because they are the last to be reached by global evangelism.

The missionaries target communities in crisis because they have found that displaced and desperate people are especially receptive to the evangelical recordings. When uprooted from one's home, as in the case of Mexican migrant workers, the sound of one's own language is a comfort. And the audio players are appealing media gadgets. Audiences who might not otherwise be interested in the missionaries' message will listen to the recordings. The Tailenders focuses on how the media objects and messages introduced by the missionaries play a role in larger socioeconomic transformations, such as the move away from subsistence economies toward cash economies based on agricultural and industrial labor.

The film raises questions about how people who receive the recordings understand them. Gospel Recording's project is premised on a belief in the transparency of language to transmit a divinely inspired message. But because the missionaries don't speak the languages, they must enlist bilingual native speakers as translators. There is ample opportunity for mistakes, selectivity, and resistance in the translation. The film explores how meaning changes as it crosses language and culture."

(Adele Horne)

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TAGS

19392006accessible design • Adele Horne • Biblecapitalismcardboard • cardboard record player • Cardtalk • Cardtalk player • Christiancommunities in crisiscommunitycultural insensitivitycultural signalsdisplacementdocumentaryeconomyemotive manipulationethics • evangelism • first encounter • First Nationsgadget • Global Recordings Network • globalisation • Gospel Recordings • gramophone • GRN • hand operated device • hand-wound • HondurasideologyIndiaIndigenousIndigenous communities • Joy Ridderhoff • languagelow-tech • media objects • Mexicomigrant workersmissionary • proselytisation • recordingreligionresponsibilitysocial changesocio-economicsociologySolomon Islandstechnology • The Tailenders (2005) • transformationultra-low-techvillagervoice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2010

The Voder: first attempt to synthesise human speech

"The Bell Telephone Laboratory's Voder* was the first attempt to synthesise human speech by breaking it down into its component sounds and then reproducing the sound patterns electronically to create speech.

That sounds simple in theory and, in fact it was. The Voder actually produced only two basic sounds: a tone generated by a radio valve to produce the vocal sounds and a hissing noise produced by a gas discharge tube to create the sibilants. These basic sounds were passed through a set of filters and an amplifier that mixed and modulated them until what came out of the loudspeaker sounded something like this.

Unfortunately, as is often the case, what was simple in theory was extremely difficult in practice. To get the machine to actually speak required an operator to manipulate a set of keys and a foot pedal to convert the hisses and tones into vowels, consonants, stops, and inflections. And the operator needed a year's practice just to master the keys."

(David H. Szondy)

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TAGS

1939audioBell LabsBell Telephone Laboratoriescomputer historydevicediscoveryfuturistic machineshuman speechindustrial designinnovationkeyboardmachinemusical instrument • New York World's Fair • Pedro • pioneeringproduct designrobot • she saw me • simulationsoundspeculative designspeech synthesistechnology • Voder • voice • voice synthesis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 OCTOBER 2008

Len Lye: Swinging the Lambeth Walk

"Swinging the Lambeth Walk (1939), a four–minute, hand–painted Dufaycolor film 'with a colour accompaniment by Len Lye', matches visual motifs to musical instruments: diagonals introduce piano phrases, circles express drum beats, wavy horizontals represent guitars licks, vertical lines map base parts, etc. Primary red, blue and deep green colour fields are rendered frameless by upwardly cascading kite shapes, luminous tapered stripes, and batik–like patterns."

(Brett Kashmere, May 2007)

[Distributors: Govett Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, Aotearoa New Zealand]

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1939animationAotearoa New Zealandcolourcolour and musicdirect filmdrawingdrawing on film • Dufaycolor • experimental filmfilmkiwi short filmsLen LyeNew Zealand filmmakerNZpaintscratch filmscratchingsound and image • Swinging the Lambeth Walk • UKvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2004

Community studies in urban settings

"harboured in personal networks that may be far flung, rather than in urban villages of neighborhoods (The Economic Leverage of the Virtual Community)".

(Karen E. Campbell, p.71)

Campbell, K.E. 1990 "Networks Past: A 1939 Bloomington Neighborhood". Social Forces, Volume 69, Issue 1.

TAGS

1939 • Bloomington Indiana • close friendships • communitycommunity engagement • contemporary networks • friendship networks • Karen Campbell • neighbourhood • neighbourhood networks • networknetworks of social interaction • personal networks • unbounded networks • urban • urban village
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