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Which clippings match 'Ken Robinson' keyword pg.1 of 2
24 JANUARY 2015

Bud Caddell: Complexity and the Future of Advertising

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2011advertisingadvertising strategyAustronesian cultures • brand partnerships • brand refresh • bucket brigade • Bud Caddell • building resilience • business modelcollaborationcomplex systemscomplexityconvergent thinkingcreative ideascreativity • design for creativity • digital agencydivergent thinkingeducation systemhaving original ideas that have valueKen Robinsonmarketing strategy • Mawken people • Moken people • Morgan people • nomadic people • non-conformity • predicting the futureproblem-solvingproduct innovation • rapid response • rethinking strategies • sea people • sea-based culture • self-organising teamsthinking skills • tomorrows challenges • tsunami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

Human communities depend upon a diversity of talent

"One of the real challenges is to innovate fundamentally in education. Innovation is hard because it means doing something that people don't find very easy, for the most part. It means challenging what we take for granted, things that we think are obvious. The great problem for reform or transformation is the tyranny of common sense; things that people think, 'Well, it can't be done any other way because that's the way it's done.'"

(Ken Robinson, February 2010)

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2010 • ability • Abraham Lincoln • Al Gorebatching people • broken model • common sense • conception of abilityconformitydigitised world • disenthrall • diversity of talent • dogma • education dislocates • education innovationeducation reform • education revolution • education system • Eric Clapton • fast food model • having original ideas that have value • human communities • human development • human flourishing • human resourcesindustrial model of educationintelligence • Jamie Oliver • Jeremy BenthamKen Robinson • kindergarten • learning revolutionlinearity • live for the weekend • manufacturing model • Maud Gonne • mechanical process • Natalie Merchant • natural talents • order of things • organic process • our talents • pre-digital culture • previous centuries • quiet past • rise with the occasion • single function device • standardisation • stormy present • take for granted • talentTED TalksteenagerWilliam Butler Yeats • wristwatch • Zagat

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

Ken Robinson: human ability and talent is highly diverse

"Yes you know there's this view that only special people are creative and it's not me. It's not it's not anybody I really know. It's a very isolated sort of genius you know to be really creative. And you know people doubt their own strengths and their own capacities. So I meet all kind of people who don't really get much fulfilment from the work they do. You know they just get through it and wait for the weekend. But I also meet people who love what they do. And couldn't imagine doing anything else. You know if you set and don't this anymore they wouldn't' know what you were talking about because this is who they are. You know I mean like I don't know what else I would do. They are so to speak in their element. And so the book is about that. It's about the journeys people took to discover their own talents and what difference it made in their lives. And I talk to all kinds of people. It's not just interviews. But the book is seasoned as you know with interviews with people in science in business in the arts in sports in technology all kinds of different fields and what's interesting to me is of course it's different for everybody and this is really a key point you know that human ability and talent is highly diverse. You know what turns somebody on might totally turn somebody else off. What excites some propel does not excite other people and I know when I am signing the book these days I always ask people what they do. And when they tell me I ask them if they like it. And I always think it's great when people say I love it. Because you just never [inaudible].'"

(Ken Robinson, Conversations from Penn State)

Fig.1 Conversations from Penn State Episode 207: Sir Ken Robinson, Uploaded by WPSU TV/FM/Online on 6 Nov 2010, YouTube.

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2010 • all kinds of different fields • American schools • auditory learning • being really creative • career journeycareer narrativeconformity • Conversations from Penn State • creative capacity • creative capacity developmentcreativityeducation innovationeducation reformeducation systemgeniusgenius of the individualget a jobhuman resourcesisolated sort of geniusKen Robinson • kinaesthetic learning • kinesthetic learninglearning styleslone genius • no child left behind • only special people are creative • pathologized • Patty Satalia • PBSpedagogic codepedagogy • Penn State • PennState • Pennsylvania • psychologically abnormal • school systemsschoolingSingaporesocial construction of knowledgestandardisationstandardised testingstatistics can tell you most thingsSTEMstudenttailored curriculumtailoring curriculumtalent • talent is highly diverse • teaching to the test • three types of learners • University of Warwickvisual learning • WPSU

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2010

Ken Robinson: Changing education paradigms

"In this talk from RSA Animate, Sir Ken Robinson lays out the link between 3 troubling trends: rising drop–out rates, schools' dwindling stake in the arts, and ADHD. An important, timely talk for parents and teachers."

(RSA Animate, Filmed October 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 SEPTEMBER 2010

The entire notion of school 'subjects' needs to be questioned

"In fact, the entire notion of 'subjects' needs to be questioned, [Sir Ken Robinson] says. 'The idea of separate subjects that have nothing in common offends the principle of dynamism. School systems should base their curriculum not on the idea of separate subjects, but on the much more fertile idea of disciplines ... which makes possible a fluid and dynamic curriculum that is interdisciplinary.'

In December, the Rose review, the biggest inquiry into primary schooling in a generation, also recommended moving away from the idea of subjects. Sir Jim Rose said a 'bloated' curriculum was leaving children with shallow knowledge and understanding. The review proposed half a dozen cross–curricular themes instead: understanding English, communication and languages; mathematical understanding; science and technological understanding; human, social and environmental understanding; understanding physical education and wellbeing; and understanding the arts and design.

Robinson believes the curriculum should be much more personalised. 'Learning happens in the minds and souls, not in the databases of multiple–choice tests.' And why are we so fixated by age groups, he asks. Let a 10–year–old learn with their younger and older peers.

We put too high a premium on knowing the 'single right answer', Robinson claims. But he says he is not in principle opposed to standardised tests, such as Sats. Used in the right way, they can provide essential data to support and improve education. The problem comes when these tests become more than simply a tool of education and turn into the focus of it, he argues."

(Jessica Shepherd, 10 February 2009, The Guardian)

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creative thinkingcreativitycreativity in the classroom • cross-curricular themes • cross-disciplinarycurriculumdisciplines • dynamic curriculum • educationeducation reformeducation systemexamsinterdisciplinary • Jim Rose • Ken Robinsonlearningpedagogyperformativitypersonalisationpost-disciplinerisk-takingschoolsstudentteachingUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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