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21 SEPTEMBER 2012

Choose Your Own Adventure iPad App Retells Frankenstein

"Frankenstein, by Dave Morris, is a new kind of interactive novel, that places you right there, in Frankenstein's lab, by his side as he turns the winch and brings the spark of life to bear on his creation... Following and adapting Mary Shelley's original text, Frankenstein is a new reading experience designed from the ground up for mobile devices.

Yes. I succeeded in discovering the cause of generation and life. More than that: I am myself capable of bestowing animation upon lifeless matter. Here are my lodgings... Come up, and I will show you.

This unique literary app places you in conversation with Frankenstein himself as his story unfolds. He will be your guide, and you his advisor (sic). Console, counsel or condemn him: the choice is yours.

Written by best–selling author Dave Morris, designed and developed for iOS by inkle and published by award–winning publisher, Profile Books, Frankenstein is a whole new way of experiencing Mary Shelley's classic tale of terror, tragedy and revenge."

(inkle Ltd.)

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TAGS

2012breathe life intochoose your own adventureconvergencecreationcreation of a new species • Dave Morris • digital booksdigital mediae-bookFrankensteinhybrid forminkle Ltd.interactive noveliOSiPad App • literary app • Mary Shelleymobile devicesmoral imaginations • new reading experience • novella • Profile Books • reading experience • spark of life • storytelling formatthe future of the book • unfolding story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2012

The Future of the Book: design speculation

"The Future of the Book is a design exploration of digital reading that seeks to identify new opportunities for readers, publishers, and authors to discover, consume, and connect in different formats.

As more people consume pages in pixels, IDEO designers wondered why we continue to discover and consume the written word through the old analog, page–turning model. We asked: what happens when the reading experience catches up with new technologies?

The team looked at how digital and analog books currently are being read, shared and collected, as well as at trends, business models and consumer behavior within related fields. We identified three distinct opportunities – new narratives, social reading with richer context, and providing tools for critical thinking – and developed a design concept around each one.

The first concept, 'Alice,' turns storytelling on its head by making narratives non–linear and participatory. With Alice, the story world starts bleeding into the everyday life of the reader. Real–world challenges, like acting on a phone call from the lead character, or participating in photo based scavenger hunts, unlock new aspects of the story, and turn other readers into collaborators or competitors. Alice is a platform for authors to experiment with narratives, to allow their stories to transcend media, and to engage fans in the storytelling process.

The second concept, 'Coupland,' makes book discovery a social activity by allowing readers to build shared libraries and hear about additional texts through existing networks. Coupland makes it easy for busy professionals to stay on top of industry must–reads. Businesses can assign book budgets to their employees and build collective libraries through a group–licensing model. Personal recommendations, aggregation of reading patterns, and the ability to follow inspiring individuals and groups help ensure that Coupland users always are tapped into the latest essential content within and outside of the organization.

The third concept, 'Nelson,' connects books to commentary, critique, and contextual information, letting readers explore a topic from multiple perspectives. Nelson reinforces the role of books as carriers of knowledge and insight. Readers can explore polarizing material and see whose word currently has the greatest impact on popular opinion and debate. Layers of connected commentary, news, and fact–checking augment the core book content – providing greater context and encouraging debate and scrutiny.

Each concept features a simple, accessible storytelling format and a particular look and feel. We believe that digital technology creates possibilities, so our solutions truly adapt to the new environment, rather than emulate analog qualities onscreen. For example, we resisted any temptation to move books closer to the bite–sized character of other digital media, because longhand writing encourages immersion (deep reading) and reflection."

(IDEO, 2010)

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2010Alice in Wonderlandanalogue bookbooks • collective libraries • connected commentary • consumer behaviour • contextual information • convergence • deep reading • design concept • design exploration • different formats • digital booksdigital mediadigital readingdigital technology • Douglas Coupland • end of printenvisioningformatfuture of the bookgo digitalhybrid formIDEO • inspiring individuals • intertwingularity • longhand writing • look and feelmedia formsmultiple perspectives • must-reads • narrative • new narratives • new opportunitiesnew technologiesnon-linearoff the pagepage-turning model • pages in pixels • personal recommendation • pictures under glass • reader • readersreading experience • reading patterns • rich context • shared libraries • social activity • social readingspeculative designstorystorytellingstorytelling formattechnology convergenceTed Nelsonthe future of the booktrendswritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2012

Does electronic literature have a future?

"Does electronic literature have a future? Is Google the end of the World? What is the role of digital poetics in global politics? These issues and more are discussed with J. R. Carpenter, John Cayley, Maria Mencia, Scott Rettberg, Alexandra Saemmer, Roberto Simanowski, and Jaka Železnikar."

A video–essay by Talan Memmott and David Prater, September 2011 at the ELMCIP Electronic Literature and New Media Art Seminar in Ljubljana Slovenia.

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2011 • Alexandra Saemmer • Blekinge Institute of Technology • bookcollaborative research projectconvergencecreative researchcreativity and innovationdigital culture • digital poetics • distributed communication environment • Edinburgh College of Art • electronic literature • Electronic Literature and New Media • electronic literature community • ELMCIP • Facebookglobal politicsglobalisationGoogle Inc • HERA • Humanities in the European Research Area • innovation in practice • J. R. Carpenter • Jaka Zeleznikar • John Cayley • JRPliterature • Maria Mencia • network-based creative community • networked creativity • New Media Scotland • publishingreadingreading experienceresearch and practice • Roberto Simanowski • Scott Rettberg • Sloveniatactile experience • Talan Memmott • the future of the booktranscultural • transnational • University College Falmouth • University of Amsterdam • University of Bergen • University of Jyvaskyla • University of Ljubljana • video essay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

Baby plays with iPad, frustrated by paper magazine

"A YouTube video shows a 1–year–old expertly using an iPad – pinching and swiping – and then tries the same moves on a paper magazine without results."

(Jeff Glor reports, 14 October 2011, CBS News)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2011

Monkey Magazine: a new publishing vernacular?

"In the future, as depicted in the 2002 film Minority Report, our periodicals will create interactive, hybrid reading/viewing experiences–with built–in sound and motion–based commercials rather than static advertisements, incorporating news footage with pages that dissolve and re–form to reflect breaking stories. Despite minute gestures in that direction, such as the Amazon Kindle and G24, The Guardian's PDF newspaper that's updated throughout the day, that vision of media–if there's really a market for it–is a long way off. ...

Nevertheless, something ... is now available weekly from Dennis Publishing, the company that gave the world The Week, Maxim and several other British 'lad magazines' as well as launched their American spin–offs. Monkey is proportioned like a glossy, has an interface that mimics the turning of pages and even has a magazine–like layout: margins, a basic two–column grid, images combined with text and print–like pacing. The difference is that Monkey's text sparkles (literally, if not figuratively), dances and slides onto the page. Many of the photos will turn into movies or slideshows (some rather naughty) when clicked, and on some spreads users can shuffle page elements, substituting one image for another. The format also changes to serve its content. A small mini–magazine with short reviews is digitally 'stitched' into the 'middle' of each issue. Additionally, most advertisements come alive, thanks either to Flash, streaming video or some combination, showing previews of movies or commercials for products framed by the equivalent of a full–page ad.

To be sure, Monkey does nothing that isn't done on other websites, and it has formal predecessors for its page interface–the arty This Is a Magazine, for one, and the webified versions of print glossies from Zinio for another. But unlike the wider web–which has evolved its own vocabulary and conventions for storytelling–and other web magazine predecessors–for which the turn–the–page interface seems a formal conceit–Monkey truly blends old and new media design conventions in a way that is both appalling and appealing."

(Jandos Rothstein, 29 January 2008)

Fig.1 Monkey Magazine, 2011. Dennis Publishing, Issue 183, pp.8,9.

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Adobe FlashAIGAAmazon Kindleanimated presentationcelebritycontent formconventions • Dennis Publishing • design aestheticsdesign conventionsdesign for the screendesign vocabulary • digitally stitched • e-zine • ezine • formal conceit • G24 • hybridhybrid experiencehybrid forms • lads mag • magazinemagazine layout • Maxim (magazine) • mens magazine • mini-magazine • Minority Report • Monkey Magazine • motion-based commercials • multimedianaughtynew medianews footagenewspaper • page interface • page metaphorpaginationpastiche • PDF newspaper • pin-upprediction • print glossies • print-like • publishingreading experience • screen dissolve • sexslide showstorytellingstreaming videoThe Guardian • The Week (magazine) • This Is a Magazine • triviaturn-the-page interfaceuser experience design (UX)vernacularviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual languagevisual vernacularweb designweb magazineweb vernacularwebified • webzine • Zinio (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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