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Which clippings match 'Readability' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 FEBRUARY 2014

Design conventions for magazine page layout design

"Each magazine page consists of several crucial elements. Image below is your guide and I will explain each of those elements in brief. Since these elements are important, you should have deeper understanding on how to work with them."

(Nikola Mileta, 26 March 2013, Magazine Designing)

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TAGS

Adobe InDesignbleed (typography) • body copy • body text • box copy • byline • column width • content panel • copy editor • credits • deck (magazine design) • design conventions • design element • design for magazines • design for printdesign vocabulary • feature spread • foliographic design • gutter (printing) • headline • headline size • image bleed • image caption • intro • introduction • kicker (magazine design) • layout designmagazine designmagazine layoutmagazine spread • multi page spread • page columns • page design • page elements • page layout design • page margins • page navigation • page number • page size • page template • pagesettingprint design • publication date • publication design • publication logo • pull quote • pull-out • readability • running head • sans-serif type • sans-serif typeface • section head • section title • serif • serif type • subhead • subheading • subheads • text blocks • textual element • type element • type size • type style • visual communication • written text

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 NOVEMBER 2012

The Fallen Easel: an evocative and visually stylish provisionality

"John Baldessari's 1987 work titled The Fallen Easel is made up of nine framed panels containing fragmentary images that seem to add up as a complex non sequitur. The lone diagonal panel shows a grayscale screen print of an easel laying on the ground, while other panels show faces and hands that are sometimes obscured by ovals of bright flat colors. Clearly, we see a rebus of sorts, but its substitution of picture–fragments for a syllogistic circuit remains just outside of the grasp of routine readability. Mentally reassembling them does not help, and the narrative context that would enable the work to be analyzed in the manner of a dream is missing. We can only conclude that the relationship between the work's diverse elements is one of an evocative and visually stylish provisionality, but we remain haunted by it, for it keeps us coming back in search of the key that will unlock its beguiling mystery of allegorical displacements and substitutions. Yes, this is an update of a kind of surrealism, but there is something else going on here as well, something pertaining to the typical psychological distance created by mass media imagery striped of its pretense of narrative coherence. All at once, the linked histories of Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Postmodernism flash before our eyes. We are not in Kansas anymore, but is unclear exactly where we are or where anything else is for that matter."

(Mark Van Proyen, November 2009, art ltd. magazine)

Fig.1 John Baldessari (1987). "The Fallen Easel" colour lithograph and screenprint in five parts printed on paper and aluminium plates. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer. Photo: courtesy of Legion of Honor Museum.

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TAGS

1987allegorical displacements • allegorical substitutions • allegory • beguiling mystery • colour lithograph • complex non sequitur • composition • compositional practice • conceptual art • diverse elements • easel • flat colourfragmentary • fragmentary images • framed panels • John Baldessari • Legion of Honor Museum • linked histories • mass media • narrative coherence • narrative context • non sequitur • not in Kansas anymore • obscured view • oval • picture fragmentspop artpostmodernism • pretense • print retrospective • provisional • provisionality • psychological distance • readability • rebus • routine readability • screenprintsurrealism • syllogism • syllogistic circuit • The Fallen Easel • unlock • visually stylish provisionality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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