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20 JULY 2014

Choreographed Typography by Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae

"Created by Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae, The Moment is an exploration of language, how the meaning is formed from words. Hyun Ju Song describes a situation when people face an absurd situation in Korea, they say 'It makes no word.' This project is about the absurd moment and creates no word out of words."

(Filip Visnjic, 12/02/2014, CreativeApplications.Net)

Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae (2013). "The Moment", Concept, visual programming & performance by Song, Hyun Ju, Sound programming & performance by Bae, Mi Lyoung. A generative design work where the Latin alphabet is transformed into abstract geometry using 3–screen–projection, Processing and Max/MSP.

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2013 • abstract geometry • alphabet • animated text • audiovisual experienceaudiovisual performanceblack and white • CreativeApplications.Net • disassemblegenerative design • Hyun Ju Song • Korean artist • Latin alphabet • Latin wordlegibilityletterformlive animationlive audiovisual performanceMax/MSPmedia artist • Mi Lyoung Bae • moving typeProcessing (software)projection worksrealtime animationsound design • sound programming • soundscape • The Moment (2013) • typo art projecttypographytypography experimentsvisual interpretation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2013

The debate in 1991: digital or hand-crafted type?

"Metal setting is practised today by only a handful of specialists, but it continues to provide the standards by which good typesetting is judged. Photosetting, and the computer setting which has largely displaced it, are criticised for being too perfect and lacking the character of hand–crafted type. Now, increasingly, designers are using desktop publishing systems such as the Macintosh to do their typesetting. The technology has matured considerably over the last two years and the time is ripe for a reassessment: is good typesetting possible on the Macintosh?"

(Andy Benedek, 1991)

Andy Benedek (1991). "The craft of digital type" Winter no. 2 vol. 1, Eye Magazine.

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1991Adobe Systems • Aldus PageMaker • AppleApple LaserWriter • bit-mapped font • computer font • computer typesetting • Courier (typeface) • descender • design craftdesign for printdesktop publishingdisplay font • Emigre (magazine) • Eye (magazine) • font foundry • graphic designerhand-craftedhand-crafted typeHelvetica • hot metal typesetting • individual characterlegibility • letter-spacing • letterpress • Linotype (foundry) • MacMacintoshMacintosh computermetal type • metal typesetting • monotypeoffset printing • optical compensation • page description language • page layoutperfection • photosetting • PostScript • PostScript typeface • technology affordances • Times (typeface) • too perfect • traditional practicestypefacetypesettingtypography • Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber • URW

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

How much of a language is silent? What does it look like when you take the silence out? Can we use code as a tool to answer these questions?

"silenc is a tangible visualization of an interpretation of silent letters within Danish, English and French.

One of the hardest parts about language learning is pronunciation; the less phonetic the alphabet, the harder it is to correctly say the words. A common peculiarity amongst many Western languages is the silent letter. A silent letter is a letter that appears in a particular word, but does not correspond to any sound in the word's pronunciation.

A selection of works by Hans Christian Andersen is used as a common denominator for these 'translations'. All silent letters are set in red text. When viewed with a red light filter, these letters disappear, leaving only the pronounced text.

silenc is based on the concept of the find–and–replace command. This function is applied to a body of text using a database of rules. The silenc database is constructed from hundreds of rules and exceptions composed from known guidelines for 'un'pronunciation. Processing code marks up the silent letters and GREP commands format the text.

silenc is visualized in different ways. In one form of a book, silent letters are marked up in red yet remain in their original position. In another iteration, silent letters are separated from the pronounced text and exhibited on their own pages in the back of the book, the prevalence of silent letters is clearly evident."

(Momo Miyazaki, Manas Karambelkar and Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen)

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2012alphabetbookCIIDCopenhagen Institute of Interaction Designcorrelative analogueDanishEnglish • exceptions • find-and-replace • FrenchGREP • GREP command • Hans Christian Andersen • Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen • language • learning language • legibility • Manas Karambelkar • Momo Miyazaki • phonetics • Processing (software)pronunciationredrules • Silenc (project) • silence • silent letter • sound correspondencetangible visualisationtexttranslation • visualisation interpretation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JUNE 2011

The Grid System: an online resource

"Made popular by the International Typographic Style movement and pioneered by legends like Josef Müller–Brockmann and Wim Crouwel, the grid is the foundation of any solid design. The Grid System is an ever–growing resource where graphic designers can learn about grid systems, the golden ratio and baseline grids."

(Antonio Carusone)

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Aisle One • Antonio Carusone • baseline grids • design formalismgolden ratiographic communicationgraphic devicesgridgrid systemInternational Typographic StyleJosef Muller-Brockmann • layout aesthetics • layout designlegibilitymental imageorderingstructure • the grid system • typographyvisual communicationWim Crouwel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2011

From Urban Experiences to Architectural Narratives

"Cities are a densely coded context for narratives of discovery and the recovery of experience. They have a capacity to act as condensers of information and to integrate assimilations of behaviours, people, styles, typologies, forms, ideas. Cities are comprehended through spatial practices. Movement in the city is a major practice which enables us to accumulate and organize urban experiences. It creates spatial narratives containing memories and views, specific places, objects, beginnings and ends, distances, shadows, buildings or parts of them, encounters, signs and panoramas. Urban space becomes intelligible through sequences of movement. Its complexity, mystery, splendour, rhythm, are revealed and interrelated through the route of the urban dweller. Similarly to urban space, architectural space is perceived in terms of sequences and spatial practises. According to Jean Nouvel 'To erect a building is to predict and seek effects of contrasts and linkage through which one passes...in the continuous sequence that a building is...the architect works with cuts and edits, framings and openings...screens, planes legible from obligatory points of passage'."

(Vaso Trova)

Vaso Trova (2008). 24th NCBDS: 'We Have Never Been Pre–Disciplinary', Georgia Institute of Technology. Sabir Khan, Chair.

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architectural narratives • architectural spacearchitecturebehaviourcitiesdwellingencountersexperienceframe • Jean Nouvel • legibility • linkage • memorymovementnarratives of discovery • NCBDS • place • points of passage • programmatic spacerhythmsequence of spacessequences and spatial practises • sequences of movement • spacespatial configurationspatial literacyspatial narratives • spatial practices • typologies • urban • urban dweller • urban experiences • urban spaceurbanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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