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Which clippings match 'Tim Berners-Lee' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 SEPTEMBER 2014

Horizon: The defenders of anonymity on the internet

"Yet while anonymity offers a potential bulwark against surveillance, for those who do not wish to be watched, it has also helped in the development of that part of the online world known as the dark web.

Sites on the dark web like Silk Road have used Tor technology to hide their location and yet still be available to users who wish to visit them.

The dark web has now become a focus for law enforcement officers who believe it is facilitating a variety of illegal activities including financial crime and child abuse."

(Mike Radford, 3 September 2014, BBC News)

Fig.1 "Inside the Dark Web" 2014, television programme, BBC Two – Horizon, Series 51, Episode 4, first broadcast: 3 September 2014.

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2014 • anonymising networks • anonymity • anonymous communication • anonymous protocol • anonymous system • anonymous web browsing • BBC Twobitcoin • black market • Chelsea Manning • child abusecommunications monitoring • controversial technology • crime evasion • criminal actscryptographycybercrime • dark internet • dark web • data securityDavid Chaum • deep web • deepnet • detection • digital realm • dissidents • distributed filesharing network • distributed network • Edward Snowden • encryption • file sharing • financial crime • free market economy • GCHQ • government agencies • hidden network • hidden web • Horizon (BBC TV series) • I2P • information flowsinformation retrieval • information use • Internet • Interpol • invisible web • Jacob Appelbaum • Joss Wright • Julian Assangelaw enforcement • Mix Network • monitoring • National Security Agency • NSAonline activities • online marketplace • online space • Oxford Internet Institute • privacy and security • search engines • Silk Road (marketplace) • surface web • surveillancetelecommunicationsTim Berners-LeeTortraffic analysis • Troels Oerting • US Naval Research Laboratory Tor • Wikileaksworld wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 FEBRUARY 2013

The Open Data Institute

"The Open Data Institute will catalyse the evolution of an open data culture to create economic, environmental, and social value. It will unlock supply, generate demand, create and disseminate knowledge to address local and global issues.

We will convene world–class experts to collaborate, incubate, nurture and mentor new ideas, and promote innovation. We will enable anyone to learn and engage with open data, and empower our teams to help others through professional coaching and mentoring."

(Tim Berners–Lee and Nigel Shadbolt)

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2012datadata accessdata sharing • direct revenue • learn and engage • match funding • mentoringnew ideasNigel Shadboltnon-profit • ODI • Omidyar Network • open data • open data culture • Open Data Institute • professional coaching • ShoreditchSilicon Roundabouttechnology innovationTechnology Strategy BoardTim Berners-LeeUK • UK innovation agency

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2012

Citations and impact factors are old hat: the Web 2.0 generation needs metrics to match today's scholarship

"As a young academic, I am reliably informed that the landscape of scholarly communication is not what it was 20 years ago. But, despite all that has changed, it seems that we still largely rely upon the same tired and narrow measures of quality and academic impact – namely, citation counts and journal impact factors.

As someone who has used the internet in almost every aspect of their academic work to date, it's hard for me to ignore the fact that these mechanisms, in predating the web, largely ignore its effects.

By holding up these measures as incentives, we appear to have our eye firmly fixed on the hammer and not the nail, adjusting our research habits in order to maximise scores and ignoring issues such as why we publish in the first place."

(Matthew Gamble, 28 July 2011, Times Higher Education)

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academic blogs • academic discussion • academic impactacademic papersacademic work • alt-metrics • alt-metrics community • alt-metrics movement • altmetrics.org • assessing impactassessment of scholarshipblogCERNcitation • citation counts • citation-based measures • citation-based measures of impactdiverse metricsengaged scholars • existing measures • funding decisions • Harvard Universityimpact • impressions of impact • incentive • Internetjournal impact • journal impact factors • journal output • measurementmeasurement of impactMendeleymetricsnarrow measures • narrow measures of academic impact • narrow measures of quality • new measurement frontieronline • online reference-management service • peer review • platform for scholarly communication • practices of scholarly communication • products of scholarly communication • publication of academic papersquantitative study of scholarship • ReaderMeter • readermeter.org • real-time readership • reference manager • research habits • research impactresearch output • Rouse Ball • Samuel Arbesman • scholarly activity • scholarly activity on the web • scholarly communication • scientific discoveries • second scientific revolution • Tim Berners-Lee • timely indications of impact • Timothy Gowers • traces of scholarship • TwitterUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of North Carolina • utility of the web • Web 2.0 • web as a platform • young academics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2010

The Virtual Library: the oldest catalogue of the Web

"The WWW Virtual Library (VL) is the oldest catalogue of the Web, started by Tim Berners–Lee, the creator of HTML and of the Web itself, in 1991 at CERN in Geneva. Unlike commercial catalogues, it is run by a loose confederation of volunteers, who compile pages of key links for particular areas in which they are expert; even though it isn't the biggest index of the Web, the VL pages are widely recognised as being amongst the highest–quality guides to particular sections of the Web."

(The WWW Virtual Library)

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1991catalogueCERNdigital cultureGenevahistoryHTMLICTindexinnovationonlinepioneeringqualitySwitzerlandtaxonomyTim Berners-Leevirtual library • VL • volunteerweb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2008

W3C: standardising the web

"The W3C mission is to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing protocols and guidelines that ensure the long–term growth of the Web. Below we discuss important aspects of this mission, all of which further W3C's vision of One Web."

(World Wide Web Consortium)

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19941995adoption of standardsagreementARPAnetCERN • compatibility • computer scienceconsortium • core principles • DARPA • Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency • digital cultureEuropean Commission • European Organization for Nuclear Research • guidelinesHTML • incompatibility • inconsistency • industry members • information technology • INRIA • international communityInternet • Jeffrey Jaffe • knowledge management • LCS • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory • member organisations • MITnew medianew standardsone webontologypredictabilityprinciplesprotocolssemantic websoftware engineeringsolutionspecificationstandardisationstandards compliantstandards-based web technologiesstructurestructured datatechnologyTim Berners-Leeunificationusability • vendors • W3Cwebweb pagesweb standards • World Wide Web Consortium

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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