Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Harry Potter' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 MAY 2011

Keeping Britain's special effects dream alive

"The country's reputation as the go–to Hollywood alternative was underlined at this year's Academy Awards when London–based Double Negative picked up the visual effects Oscar for its work on Inception.

The company, which has also been involved in the Harry Potter and Batman series, employs around 950 people at its headquarters in Soho.

Across the UK, approximately 5,000 people work in SFX post–production, according to the UK Screen Association.

But while business is currently booming, there are dark, computer–generated, clouds on the horizon.

A report, commissioned by the government and published earlier this year, delivered a worrying prognosis.

It warned that, while special effects was enjoying a rapid growth, the sector was also 'having to source talent from overseas because of skills shortages at home'.

The study, entitled Next Gen, concluded: 'That is mainly a failing of our education system – from schools to universities and it needs to be tackled urgently if we are to remain globally competitive.'

Part of the problem is the lack of awareness of the profession among young people, according to Paul Franklin, a visual effects supervisor and part of Double Negative's Oscar–winning team.

'There is not a huge amount of information available to them,' he told BBC News.

'Typically you tend to find that students who are seeking out courses in visual effects and film–making are the self motivated types who have gone out and found the information themselves.'

'It is something we work very hard at, but schools and colleges could be more aware about how a creative art education can be applied in the world of high–end modern digital media,' he said."

(BBC News, 14 May 2011)

1

TAGS

Academy Award • accolade • American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences • AMPAS • Batmancomputer-generated • creative art education • creative careercreative economydesign curriculadesign disciplinedesign professiondigital mediaDouble Negativeeducation systemfilmmaking • globally competitive • Harry PotterHollywoodInception (2010) • lack of awareness • LondonNext Gen. reportOscar • Paul Franklin • post productionprofessional practiceSFXskills shortageSohospecial effectsstudentUK • UK Screen Association • VFX industriesvisual effects • visual effects supervisor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2010

Reading ban on leaked Harry Potter

"Fourteen fans bought Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince from The Real Canadian Superstore in Coquitlam on the west coast of Canada before managers realised their mistake [selling books that were under embargo]. But readers will be unable to share their knowledge after Raincoast Books, the book's Canadian publisher, was granted a 'John Doe' injunction prohibiting the buyers from even reading their copies before the publication date.

The supreme court of British Columbia issued a court order preventing anyone from 'displaying, reading, offering for sale, selling or exhibiting in public' their books. J. K. Rowling's legal advisers said that the author was entitled to prevent buyers from reading their own books even though they had not broken the law.

'The fact is that this is property that should not have been in their possession,' said Neil Blair, a legal specialist for Christopher Little, the author's literary agent. 'Copyright holders are entitled to protect their work. If the content of the book is confidential until July 16, which it is, why shouldn't someone who has the physical book be prevented from reading it and thereby obtaining the confidential information? How they came to have access to the book is immaterial'."

(The Times Online)

1

TAGS

added valuearts and innovationarts fundingauthorbookBritish ColumbiaCanadacommercialismconfidentialcopyright • Coquitlam • creative capitalcreative entrepreneurshipcreative industries • embargo • entrepreneurfundingHarry Potter • Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince • JK Rowlingmarket failuremarketspatron • Raincoast Books • social gainsponsorship • The Real Canadian Superstore • value of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.