Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Alienation' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 FEBRUARY 2016

After Accelerationism: The Xenofeminist Manifesto

"Xenofeminism is gender-abolitionist...Let a hundred sexes bloom! ...[And, let's] construct a society where traits currently assembled under the rubric of gender, no longer furnish a grid for the asymmetric operation of power… You're not exploited or oppressed because you are a wage labourer or poor; you are a labourer or poor because you are exploited..."

(The Laboria Cuboniks collective, 11 June 2015, &&& Journal)

1

TAGS

2015 • accelerationism • alien future • alienationalternative visions • aporias of difference • artificial wombs • becomingbody politicsbrave new world • class exclusion • counterculturecritical reinterpretationcyberfeminismdehumanisationdystopian futureearly 21st century • emancipatory potential of technology • exclusionfeminism • foundationalism • freedom from • freedom to • futuristic visiongender politics • gender-abolitionist • groundless universalism • human sexual experience • identity politicsImmanuel Kant • Laboria Cuboniks (collective) • liminalitymanifestomathematical abstractionmeaning-contextsmediated representationmutant sciencenetwork society • Nicolas Bourbaki • nodes of collective agreement • objective realityporous boundaries • prometheanism • protean ambition • race exclusion • radical recomposition • rationalityreterritorialisationselfhood • sexes • state of alienation • synthetic hormones • techno-utopiatechnoculture • technological alienation • transect • transfeminist perspective • transfeminist political project • transgender • transits • transmodernity • transtemporal • visions of the future • xenofeminism • xenofeminist • xenofeminist manifesto • XFM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 OCTOBER 2012

A social mirror to the prevalence of casual homophobia on Twitter

"This website is designed as a social mirror to show the prevalence of casual homophobia in our society. Words and phrases like 'faggot,' 'dyke,' 'no homo,' and 'so gay' are used casually in everyday language, despite promoting the continued alienation, isolation and – in some tragic cases – suicide of sexual and gender minority (LGBTQ) youth.

We no longer tolerate racist language, we're getting better at dealing with sexist language, but sadly we're still not actively addressing homophobic and transphobic language in our society.

Let's put an end to casual homophobia. Speak out when you see or hear homophobic or transphobic language from friends, at school,

in the locker room, at work or online. Use #NoHomophobes to show your support. And visit one of our resource websites to get more involved."

(NoHomophobes.com)

1

TAGS

#NoHomophobes • alienationcasual discrimination • casual expression • casual homophobia • casual reference • critiquecultural signalsdata analysisdykeeveryday • everyday language • faggotgay • gender minority • homo • homophobia • homophobic language • information designintoleranceisolation • LGBTQ • locker room • metrics • minority • mirror • no homo • NoHomophobes • racist languagerepresentationsentiment analysissexist language • sexual minority • so gay • social activismsocial changesocial commentsocial differentiation • social mirror • social normssocial responsibilitysuicide • transphobic • transphobic language • TwitterTwitter streamwords and phrasesyouth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2010

Sister Midnight: metamorphosis, alienation and collapse played out in the border town of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

The ongoing femicides in the border town of Ciudad Juarez, a real and socially relevant and current, ongoing news story is something that I will attempt to present using comic art, adapting Kafka's story to use as a foundation for visual treatments of real horror. The themes of metamorphosis, alienation and the collapse of a family unit are shared in Kafka's text and the news coverage of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The comics medium will be used to communicate with the audience and have them interact with the issue.

I first heard of the situation in Juarez from my Spanish teacher while in Guadalajara, Mexico and the story stayed with me. A very different Mexico was depicted closer to the border than what I had seen in my experiences of travelling around the country. The ugliness of the murders is heightened by the ongoing corruption that surrounds them. I feel confident that I can now give the story a worthy visual treatment, something that has been lacking in recent film treatments of the situation. For years, young women have been preyed on by rapists and murderers while commuting to factories on the outskirts of the city. The killings continue and, to use imagery from Kafka, the men who commit these crimes are like vermin or cockroaches.

['Sister Midnight' is a comic book created by David Valente as part of his MA in Illustration at Nottingham Trent University (UK) in 2010. The comic book was developed through a process of experimentation and discovery where Franz Kafka's 'Metamorphosis' was used as a study for exposing contemporary social issues in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico.]

1

TAGS

2010adaptationalienationartistic practice • Ciudad Juarez • cockroach • comic artistscomic book artcomic stripcomicscorruption • David Valente • drawingexploitation • femicide • Franz Kafkagraphic novel • Guadalajara • horrorillustrationillustrative styleinterpretationIssuu (publishing)MAMA project • maquiladora • MexicomurderNTU • Sister Midnight • The Metamorphosis • ugliness • UK • vermin • vulnerability

CONTRIBUTOR

David Valente
17 OCTOBER 2008

Situationist cinema attempt to critique capitalist consumption practices

"Debord's mode of cinematic situation construction owes much to Marx's understanding of the relationship between production and alienation, especially as articulated in the Economico-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. For Marx, the commodification of labour in a capitalist society means the loss of reality for the worker; in turn, the subsequently produced commodity ensures her simultaneous loss of and bondage to the object produced. Situationist cinema reverses this trend by refusing to produce any new filmic 'work', any reified artifact for consumption whose potential exchange value might negate the use-value acquired in its spatio-temporal projection and the subsequent construction of an indeterminately meaningful event.

Debord picks up Marxian concepts that the Marxist tradition hitherto had all but ignored, frequently echoing Marx's conclusion that alienation appears as the true induction into civil life, and, even more significantly, his observation and critique of 'commodity fetishism' in capitalist society. (3) The spectacle, Debord argues, thrives on the repetition of commodity form, reinvesting the structure with seemingly new products and images. By compiling image after image of the commodification of life by consumer capitalism (female bodies, political figures, product advertisements, popular films, and so on), his films expose this oppressive repetition and artificial sense of the new, and, as if to help along one of the most problematic concepts in Marx's work, Society of the Spectacle (1973) ponders the commodity's 'metaphysical subtleties' while sequentially imaging automobile showrooms and naked cover girls."

(Ricky Crano, 2007)

Crano, R. (2007). "Guy Debord and the Aesthetics of Cine-Sabotage." Senses of Cinema.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 DECEMBER 2007

One Of The Most Individualist Cultures Has Been Preoccupied By Community

"It seems ironic that one of the most individualist industries (internet development) in the most individualist cultures (e.g. US, UK) has spent so much time discussing community. As Meg Pickard points out, this perhaps reflects an anxiety with our own social fragmentation and alienation, a search for meaning, or possibly a yearning for a sense of community that has been lost with the decline of the "third place" ? public spaces where people would normally meet and interact physically."
(Lee Bryant)

1

TAGS

alienationbelonging • Bryant • individual • individualist • Pickard • public spacepublic spacessocial fragmentationsocial softwarethird place
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.