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12 JUNE 2012

The Florida Project: Disneyland's fore-project

"During the planning and construction of Disneyland, Walt had been introduced to the basic concepts of urban design and slowly became a self–taught expert in the field. Such seemingly dry concepts as city planning and urban decay fired his imagination. When Disney's Chief Archivist Dave Smith catalogued Walt's office in 1970, one of the books on a shelf behind Walt's desk was architect Victor Gruen's The Heart of Our Cities: The Urban Crisis, Diagnosis and Cure.

'Walt was serious about that city,' Marty [Sklar] explains. 'And he had a lot of work being done at the time' to explore its viability. Walt asked for Marty's help to coalesce his thoughts so he could produce a film to explain the project, and, over the next several months, Marty wrote a script for a 24–minute film that detailed the 'Florida Project.' In the film, an ebullient Walt explains the concept of Epcot – a full–scale city of the future where people would live, work, and play in comfort. An international shopping district would re–create scenes from around the world, and American industry would have a showcase for the latest technologies.

Walt shot the short film in October 1966. Eight weeks later, he was gone.

The brief–but–potent film, however, lived on. It was shown a handful of times in early 1967 to key constituencies: the Florida Legislature, invited guests (for a packed presentation in a Winter Park theater), and once on statewide television. The film proved vital in convincing both the Legislature and voters that Disney's Florida Project should be approved, which it was. From the moment the project was given the go–ahead, Marty says, the Company's resources were dedicated to getting Walt Disney World up and running and to regaining confidence in the absence of its founder and leader."

(John Singh and Steven Vagnini, 07 June 2012)

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TAGS

1964 • 1964 New York Worlds Fair • 1966amusement parkanniversaryarchitectural conjecture • astuter computer • city • city planning • concept artwork • Disney World ProjectDisneylandEPCOTEPCOT Center • Epcot music • Epcot on Film • Epcot tunes • evolving city • Experimental Prototype Community of TomorrowFloridafuturistfuturisticfuturistic designgeodesic • geodesic sphere • idealismimagineering • Marty Sklar • never made it off the drawing board • noveltypavilionRay Bradbury • smellitzer • technological innovationtechnological utopianism • technology showcase • theme parkurban designurban planning • Victor Gruen • Walt DisneyWalt Disney CompanyWalt Disney WorldWalt Disney World Resort

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2010

360 Panoramic Video Capture and Recording

"You have probably seen several times in the past, those immersive digital photographs in which you can easily look up and down and turn your vision all around in full 360° glory. The 360° panoramic new year's eve of 2003 in Times Square, New York, has been one of my first memorable favorites, as it captures so well the thousands of emotions and different people celebrating on the street at once.

But video technology is now surpassing even these spectacular capabilities, by delivering navigable 3D, immersive video which as good or better than the 360° navigable images you and I have seen until now.

Check this video out. Once it starts rolling, click and move your mouse in different directions. You will be surprised to see that you can now fully navigate also inside moving video images.

The visual impact is really quite shocking, especially if, this is the very first time you are in front of a 3D, immersive and fully navigable video.

This spectacular feat is achieved by utilizing eleven video streams arranged according in a geodesic fashion. By doing so it is possible to capture an almost complete spherical image; a high–resolution 360 degree view of surroundings that is seamlessly stitched together.

Immersive navigable 3D movies can integrate GIS coordinates and other metadata to create highly informative, educational or life–saving emergency and assistance video guides.

The company behind this impressive new media technology is Immersive Media Corp., based in Calgary, Canada. The company also owns the wholly–owned subsidiary Immersive Media Company, based in Portland, Oregon.

The dodecahedron, with its twelve symmetrical pentagonal facets, is the most natural geometric division of a sphere for immersive image capture. It offers symmetrical, standardized divisions of the sphere that make the most of the image produced by each lens, and produces even resolution in every direction, better blending of the images, and more even illumination of the overall scene.

Perfectly equal and parallel faces, edges and corner angles, and divisions according to the Golden Ratio: A/B=(A+B)/A

It is the most natural geometric division of a sphere for immersive video image capture. It produces:

The enormous number of pixels recorded enables the highest image quality in every direction. The result is consistent image resolution across the entire spherical frame, with photographic realism and full motion.

Over 100 million pixels per second are recorded, resulting in spherical frames of 2400x1200 pixels, 30 frames per second. With the Telemmersion System, software is not required to correct sub–standard image resolution.

Images may be viewed spherically using the IMViewer software for looking around, or in an overall panoramic sphere movie format utilizing standard video playback platforms such as Windows Media® Player or QuickTime®."

(Edited by: Luigi Canali De Rossi)

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TAGS

360 degree view360 degrees3D • Calgary • Canadadigital photographydodecahedrongeodesicGISgolden ratioimage captureimmersionimmersive • immersive image capture • Immersive Media Company • immersive photography • immersive video • IMViewer software • navigable 3D • navigable images • new media technology • New YorkOregonpanorama • panoramic sphere • photographic realismphotographyPortland (Oregon)QuickTimespectacle • spherical • stereoscopic • symmetrical • Telemmersion System • Times Squarevideo • video playback platforms • video technology • visual impact • Windows Media Player

CONTRIBUTOR

Suttana Keyuraphan
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