Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Prague' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 JANUARY 2014

Kafka's Wound by Will Self

"I am guilty of an association of ideas; or rather: I am guilty–that's a given, and in casting about for the source of my guilt I find I cannot prevent myself from linking one idea with another purely on the basis of their contiguity, in time, in place, in my own mind. It's not only ideas I connect like this, I do it with images, sensory impressions and the most epiphenomenal of mental glitches. Hume writes in his An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding that the imagination is best conceived of as a combinatorial faculty: there is nothing intrinsically imaginative about the idea of 'gold', nor the idea of 'mountain', but join them together and you have a fantastically gleaming 'gold mountain'. And might not that gold mountain be the Laurenziberg in Prague? After all, it looms over contemporary Prague–under its Czech language moniker, the Petřín–just as it loomed in the consciousness of Franz Kafka, whose earliest surviving narrative fragment, 'Description of a Struggle', is in part an account of a phantasmagorical ascent of its slopes: 'But now the cool light which precedes the rising of the moon spread over the mountain and suddenly the moon itself appeared from beyond one of the restless bushes. I on the other hand had meanwhile been gazing in another direction, and when I now looked ahead of me and suddenly saw it glowing in its almost full roundness, I stood still with troubled eyes, for my precipitous road seemed to lead straight into this terrifying moon.'"

(Kafka's Wound by Will Self)

1

TAGS

associative • associative logic • between people and things • combinatorial faculty • contiguity • Czech language • Czech RepublicDavid Hume • epiphenomenal • essay • fantastically gleaming • Franz Kafkaglitch • gold mountain • hypermedia • idea association • imaginationinformation visualisationinterlinking • linking one idea with another • linking structure • London Review of Books • mental glitch • moonnodal structureorganisational relationship • Petrin • phantasmagoricalPraguerelatednessrhizomatic associationsrhizome • sensory impressions • similitude • Will Self

CONTRIBUTOR

Anna Troisi
09 NOVEMBER 2013

Superstudio: the radical Italian architectural group

"The collective emerged in 1966 at the moment when the technocratic optimism of the first half of the 1960s was souring. The watershed was the beginning of the Cultural Revolution in China in 1966 when Mao Tse–tung gave Western intellectuals a new cause to believe in after a decade of disillusion since their faith in communism was shattered by Khrushchev's exposure of Stalin's brutalities. Events in China made Western society seem spiritually barren at a time of growing concern about the Vietnam War. In the visual arts, radicals rebelled against the extrovert imagery of Pop Art in favour of the politically engaged work of Fluxus artists like Joseph Beuys and Nam June Paik. The rising tide of political frustration culminated in the 1968 student riots in Paris and copycat protests in London, Tokyo and Prague. Women formed fledgeling feminist movements such as the Women's Liberation Front in the US and Mouvement de Libération des Femmes in France. Decades of oppression against gay men and women erupted in a pitched battle in New York, when the police tried to close the Stonewall, a gay bar in the West Village and a politicised gay rights movement exploded.

Superstudio's response was to develop its 'Anti–Design' projects: themes from which were echoed in the work of other radical architects and designers, notably the members of Archizoom, a fellow Florentine group consisting of Andrea Branzi, Gilberto Corretti, Paolo Deganello, Dario and Lucia Bartolini and Massimo Morozzi. Both groups were founded in 1966 and their first important project was to express their theories about the crisis of modernism in the Superarchitecture exhibition in Pistoia, Italy. A year later, they refined the ideas aired in Superarchitecture in a joint follow–up show in Modena."

(Design Museum)

1

TAGS

1966 • Adolfo Natalini • Alessandro Magris • Andrea Branzi • Anti-Design (agenda) • Archigram • architectural thinking • Archizoom • avant-garde • avant-garde thinking • Cristiano Toraldo di Francia • Cultural Revolution • Dario Bartolini • design museum • disillusionment • FlorenceFluxus group • Foreign Office Architects • Gilberto Corretti • ItalyJoseph Beuys • Lucia Bartolini • Mao Tse-tung • Massimo Morozzi • Modena • modernismmodernist ideals • Mouvement de Liberation des Femmes • Nam June PaikNikita Khrushchev • Paolo Deganello • Peoples Republic of Chinaphotocollage • Piero Frassinelli • Pistoia • political frustration • pop artPragueradical architecture • radical design • Rem Koolhaas • Roberto Magris • scientific method • Studio Alchymia • Superarchitecture (exhibition) • superfluous objects • Superstudio • technocratic optimism • Toraldo di Francia • University of Florence • Vietnam war • visionary scenarios • visual arts • vociferous • Womens Liberation Front

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 APRIL 2011

Art Project: take a virtual (Google) tour of famous art museums

"Simply select a museum from the homepage and then either choose 'Explore the museum' or 'View Artwork'. Once you are in the main site use the drop–down menus or the side info bar to navigate between artworks and museums. Finally create and share your own collections online."

(Google Art Project, 2011)

1
2

3

TAGS

2011 • Alte Nationalgalerie • Amsterdam • App Engine • art • Art Project (Google) • artistsartworkBerlincollectiondetailFlorenceFrance • Freer Gallery of Art • Frick Collection • gallery • Gemaldegalerie • Google Art Project • Google IncGoogle Street Viewhigh resolutionintegrationLondonMadridmappingmasterpieceMetropolitan Museum of ArtMoMAMoscowmultimedia • Museo Reina Sofia • Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza • museum • Museum Kampa • National GallerynavigationNew YorkNew York CityobjectsPalace of Versailles • Picasa • Prague • resolution • RijksmuseumsearchSt. Petersburg • State Hermitage Museum • State Tretyakov Gallery • Tate Britaintechnologytool • Uffizi Gallery • Van Gogh Museum • Versailles • viewvirtual heritagevirtual tourvisual depictionvisualisationWashington DCweb application • zoom

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2010

Jan Svankmajer: Dimensions of Dialogue 1

"Jan Švankmajer has gained a legendary reputation over several decades for his distinctive use of stop–motion technique, and his ability to make surreal, nightmarish and yet somehow funny pictures. He is still making films in Prague to this day. His movies utilise exaggerated sounds & sped–up sequences and often involve inanimate objects being brought to life through stop–motion to perform perverse and often violent acts. While many of Jan Švankmajer's films depict destructive aspects of the human psyche, 'Darkness, Light, Darkness' is a depiction of Man building himself."

(beinArt International Surreal Art Collective/Jon Beinart)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.