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31 OCTOBER 2013

Thai Health Promotion Foundation: Smoking Kid campaign

"The Thai Health Promotion Foundation (THPF) used child actors to get adult smokers to think seriously about taking their own advice on the effects of smoking. In the Thai cultural context, adults naturally take action to educate children whenever they misbehave. However, when adults themselves repeat the children's action, they overlook that misbehavior. Children carrying cigarettes approached adults in smoking areas outside busy buildings, asking for a light. Adults commonly refused and warned the children not to smoke. The children asked the adults why they themselves were smoking and gave them a 'quit smoking' brochure. The campaign won a Bronze Outdoor Lion at Cannes in 2012, Gold Special Event and Silver Online awards at the 2013 Clio AWards, Gold for Special Service at the One Show Awards, a Silver Film Lotus at the 2013 Adfest Awards."

(Duncan Macleod, 4 June 2013, The Inspiration Room)

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TAGS

2012 • Adfest Awards • advertising campaignaltruismappealbrochureCannes Film Festivalchanging our relation • child actor • childrencigarettes • Clio Awards • co-suffering • cognitive dissonancecompassion • concern for others • desire to help • distanced viewpoint • duty of care • emotive manipulationempathetic consciousnessharmhealthheld in abeyanceInspiration Room • kid • pathospersuasively suggestivepsychical distancepublic health campaign • quit smoking • self-harm • smoking area • smoking cigarettes • Smoking Kid (campaign) • Thai Health Promotion Foundation • Thailand • The One Club • THPF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2012

Psychical Distance: characters and situations in drama are unreal

"One of the best known examples is to be found in our attitude towards the events and characters of the drama; they appeal to us like persons and incidents of normal experience, except that that side of their appeal, which would usually affect us in a directly personal manner, is held in abeyance. This difference, so well known as to be almost trivial, is generally explained by reference to the knowledge that the characters and situations are 'unreal,' imaginary. In this sense Witasek, oeprating with Meinong's theory of Annahem, has described the emotions involved in witnessing a drama as Scheingefuhle, a term which has so frequently been misunderstood in discussions of his theories. But, as a matter of fact, the 'assumption' upon which the imaginative emotional reaction is based is not necessarily the condition, but often the consequence, of distance; that is to say, the converse of the reason usually stated would then be true: viz. That distance, by changing our relation to the characters, renders them seemingly fictitious, not that the fictitiousness of the characters alters our feelings toward them. It is, of course, to be granted that the actual and admitted unreality of the dramatic action reinforces the effect of Distance. But surely the proverbial unsophisticated yokel whose chivalrous interference in the play on behalf of the hapless heroine can only be prevented by impressing upon him that 'they are only pretending,' is not the ideal type of theatrical audience. The proof of the seeming paradox that it is Distance which primarily gives to dramatic action the appearance of unreliability and not vice versa, is the observation that the same filtration of our sentiments and the same seeming 'unreality' of actual men and things occur, when at times, by a sudden change of inward perspective, we are overcome by the feeling that 'all the world's a stage.'"

(Edward Bullough, 1912)

Edward Bullough (1912). "Psychical Distance" British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 5, pp. 87–117 (excerpt cited by Julie Van Camp, 22 November 2006).

Fig.1 Patricia Piccinini/Drome Pty Ltd. (2010) [http://leecasey.carbonmade.com/projects/2594595#9]

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1912aesthetics • Alexius Meinong • all the worlds a stage • Annahem • appeal • appearance of unreliability • audiencebelievabilitybreaking the fourth wallchanging our relationcharactersdirect experience • distance • distanced viewpointdrama • dramatic action • dramatic space • Edward Bullough • emotionemotional immersionemotional involvementempathyfeelings • fictitious • fictitiousnessheld in abeyanceimaginary • imaginative emotional reaction • normal experience • only pretending • our sentiments • pathospersonalpropinquitypsychical distancepsychological closeness • psychological proximity • Scheingefuhle • Stephan Witasek • suspension of disbelief • theatrical audience • unreal • unreal characters • unreal situations • unreality • verisimilitude • witnessing • yoke

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Jane Campion: A Girl's Own Story (short film)

"Jane Campion has been a dominant force in world cinema for nearly two decades. Shot delicately in black–and–white, A Girl's Own Story is an early short film that traces the stories of three suburban teenage girls (Pam, Gloria and Stella) in 1960's Australia. It deals with the difficulties of burgeoning sexuality, incest, friendship and family against the backdrop of Beatlemania and an era that valued the isolating notions of purity and wholesomeness over honesty and acceptance."

(Anton de Lonno 11 July 2010, Senses of Cinema)

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1960s1984 • A Girls Own Story • An Angel at My Table (film) • AustraliaAustralian cinemaAustralian short filmauteur • Beatlemania • black and whiteboys • burgeoning sexuality • chiaroscurocold • Cut (film) • David Lynchdesiredoll play • eery • effigyexpressionistic • expressionistic conventions • familyfemale sexualityfemininityfriendship • Gabrielle Shornegg • gender performance culture • Geraldine Haywood • haunting moment • honesty and acceptance • humour • I Feel the Cold • ice-skating • incest • Ingmar Bergman • inky suburban subconscious • intimate sexualityisolationJane Campion • lustful embrace • Marina Knight • New Zealand filmmakerparentspathos • Peter Weir • Piano (film) • puritySenses of Cinema (journal)sexual agencyshort filmsuburbanteenage girls • tenderness • The Beatles • The Portrait of a Lady (film) • wholesomeness • world cinema

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 NOVEMBER 2011

Buster Keaton: one of the greatest comic actors of all time

"Buster Keaton is considered one of the greatest comic actors of all time. His influence on physical comedy is rivaled only by Charlie Chaplin. Like many of the great actors of the silent era, Keaton's work was cast into near obscurity for many years. Only toward the end of his life was there a renewed interest in his films. An acrobatically skillful and psychologically insightful actor, Keaton made dozens of short films and fourteen major silent features, attesting to one of the most talented and innovative artists of his time. ...

Often at odds with the physical world, his ability to naively adapt brought a melancholy sweetness to the films. The subtlety of the work, however, left Keaton behind the more popular Chaplin and Lloyd. By the 1930s, the studio felt it was in their best interest to take control of his films. No longer writing or directing, Keaton continued to work at a grueling pace. Not understanding the complexity of his genius, they wrote for him simple characters that only took advantage of the most basic of his skills. For Keaton, as for many of the silent movie stars, the final straw was the advent of the talkies."

(American Masters and The Public Broadcasting Corporation)

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TAGS

actor • actor-director • American MastersBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedy • comic actor • daredevildeadpan expressionfilmmakerfunnyhumour • Joseph Frank Keaton • moviespathosPBSperformancephysical comedysilent filmsilent moviesslapstickstoicsubtlety • The Cameraman (film) • The General (film) • The Navigator (film)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2010

Charlie Chaplin: truth and naturalism through improvisation

"While Harold Lloyd played the daredevil, hanging from clocks, and Buster Keaton maneuvered through surreal and complex situations, [Charlie] Chaplin concerned himself with improvisation. For Chaplin, the best way to locate the humor or pathos of a situation was to create an environment and walk around it until something natural happened. The concern of early theater and film was to simply keep the audience's attention through overdramatic acting that exaggerated emotions, but Chaplin saw in film an opportunity to control the environment enough to allow subtlety to come through."

(Public Broadcasting Service, 28th August 2006)

TAGS

actorAmerican MastersaudienceauthorshipBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedycontroldaredevil • exaggerated emotions • filmfilm acting • Harold Lloyd • hidden treasures • humourimprovisationnaturalismpathosPBSperformancephysical comedy • Public Broadcasting Service • realismsilent moviessocial realitysubtletytheatretruth • Unknown Chaplin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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