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Which clippings match 'Amusement Park' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 FEBRUARY 2015

Achterbahn: the story behind Berlin's abandoned Spreepark

"Norbert Witte hatte einen Traum: er wollte aus dem Berliner Spreepark–einem Freizeitpark, der zu DDR–Zeiten unter dem Namen »Plänterwald« berühmt geworden ist–den größten Rummelplatz des gerade wiedervereinigten Deutschlands machen. Stattdessen ging der König der Karusselle pleite und setzte sich mit seiner Familie und dem größten Teil seiner Gerätschaften im Jahre 2002 nach Peru ab. Er hinterließ der Stadt Berlin einen Riesenberg Schulden und ein großes Chaos. In Peru verwickelt er sich und seinen 20jährigen Sohn in Drogengeschäfte. Beide landen im Knast: Norbert Witte in Deutschland, sein Sohn in einem der härtesten Knäste der Welt…"

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TAGS

19692003 • abandoned amusement park • abandoned places in Eastern Europeabandoned ruins • abandoned theme park • Achterbahn (2009) • amusement parkBerlin • boarded up • cocaine • dark undersidedeserted placesdinosaurdocumentary film • drug smuggling • drug trafficking • East Berlin • East Germany • entertainment park • filming location • fun park • fun-rides • GDRGermany • Hanna (2011) • Kulturpark Planterwald • Lima • Marcel Witte • neglected buildings • Norbert Witte • Peru • Peter Dorfler • Pia Witte • Planterwald • prison • rollercoaster • ruins • Sabrina Witte • Sarita Colonia prison • Spree river • Spreepark • Spreepark Berlin • Spreepark GmbH • Treptow-Kopenick • Treptower Park • urban decay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2012

The Florida Project: Disneyland's fore-project

"During the planning and construction of Disneyland, Walt had been introduced to the basic concepts of urban design and slowly became a self–taught expert in the field. Such seemingly dry concepts as city planning and urban decay fired his imagination. When Disney's Chief Archivist Dave Smith catalogued Walt's office in 1970, one of the books on a shelf behind Walt's desk was architect Victor Gruen's The Heart of Our Cities: The Urban Crisis, Diagnosis and Cure.

'Walt was serious about that city,' Marty [Sklar] explains. 'And he had a lot of work being done at the time' to explore its viability. Walt asked for Marty's help to coalesce his thoughts so he could produce a film to explain the project, and, over the next several months, Marty wrote a script for a 24–minute film that detailed the 'Florida Project.' In the film, an ebullient Walt explains the concept of Epcot – a full–scale city of the future where people would live, work, and play in comfort. An international shopping district would re–create scenes from around the world, and American industry would have a showcase for the latest technologies.

Walt shot the short film in October 1966. Eight weeks later, he was gone.

The brief–but–potent film, however, lived on. It was shown a handful of times in early 1967 to key constituencies: the Florida Legislature, invited guests (for a packed presentation in a Winter Park theater), and once on statewide television. The film proved vital in convincing both the Legislature and voters that Disney's Florida Project should be approved, which it was. From the moment the project was given the go–ahead, Marty says, the Company's resources were dedicated to getting Walt Disney World up and running and to regaining confidence in the absence of its founder and leader."

(John Singh and Steven Vagnini, 07 June 2012)

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TAGS

1964 • 1964 New York Worlds Fair • 1966amusement parkanniversaryarchitectural conjecture • astuter computer • city • city planning • concept artwork • Disney World ProjectDisneylandEPCOTEPCOT Center • Epcot music • Epcot on Film • Epcot tunes • evolving city • Experimental Prototype Community of TomorrowFloridafuturistfuturisticfuturistic designgeodesic • geodesic sphere • idealismimagineering • Marty Sklar • never made it off the drawing board • noveltypavilionRay Bradbury • smellitzer • technological innovationtechnological utopianism • technology showcase • theme parkurban designurban planning • Victor Gruen • Walt DisneyWalt Disney CompanyWalt Disney WorldWalt Disney World Resort

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2010

Walt Disney's Experimental Prototype Community Of Tomorrow

"Take a look at Walt Disney's vision for the city of the future, the Experimental Prototype Community Of Tomorrow or Epcot. 'No city of today will serve as the guide for the city of tomorrow,' serves as a guiding principle as varied ideas from shopping mall living, to freeways, to pedestrian safety, to high speed transit are considered. Disney himself says the city of tomorrow must abandon the old cities and their problems and be built on virgin land from scratch.

From its 'cosmopolitan convention center' to its theme–park shopping districts, Disney envisioned his 50–acre city core, completely enclosed and climate controlled like a shopping mall, hermetically sealed from the natural world. Outside of this air–conditioned environment of shops and offices, apartments, then parks and schools, then suburban houses radiate in a fantasy of controlled zoning where every use is separated from every other use.

Despite being conceived as a modern utopia based around the automobile, Epcot envisions a future of mass transit for the daily commute. 'Freeways will not be EPCOT's major way of entering and leaving the city,' declares a confident narrator. Instead, an electrified monorail and people mover will connect the city and suburb, radiating in all directions from the core. It was envisioned that the primary use of the car would be for 'weekend pleasure trips.'

Repeatedly, the dangers of automobile traffic for pedestrians are cited. The pedestrian is, in fact, declared 'king' as transportation uses, like Epcot's zoning, are completely separated. The pedestrian is 'free to walk and browse without fear of motorized vehicles.' Children and bikes have separate paths in the suburbs for walking or riding to school. Electric vehicles travel on elevated roadway's through Epcot's downtown while underground transit carries workers in and out of the city. Separate facilities for cars and trucks are provided further underground.

Disney did eventually build a prototype city, but the end result was far from what was envisioned for Epcot. The town of Celebration, Florida chose not to abandon the cities of the past but to embrace the patterns that make them so interesting to experience. New Urbanism has been brought in to create a mixed–use town center and compact living. Celebration was just as carefully planned as the Epcot of old, but the end result is quite different."

(Branden Klayko, 20 November 2009, Broken Sidewalk)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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