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12 MARCH 2016

Josef Frank Exhibition: Against Design in Vienna

"The exhibition JOSEF FRANK: Against Design presents the full scope of Frank's pioneering and diverse oeuvre. In light of his prodigious output of furniture and textile designs that remain current to this day and his intensive involvement with the possibilities of architecture and living in the modern era, the title Against Design might at first seem a puzzling choice for an exhibition on Josef Frank. Frank, whose work as a designer and design critic continues to be considered contemporary today, represented a pragmatic approach to design and argued for a simple and 'normal'—but by no means normative—architecture and design. He believed that existing elements should be taken into account as a matter of course and intuitively developed for practical use, without striving toward representation and innovation. To Frank, it was not so much the formal qualities, but those of social experience that were important; his interiors and household objects were not intended to be subjected to formalist concepts, but placed at the service of convenience.

Especially today, Josef Frank's ideas about an uncontrived and unpretentious functionality, whose aim was an independent, free, enlightened bourgeois domestic culture far from stylistic dogmas and fashionable conventions, seem more relevant than ever."

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applied artsarchitecture • architecture and design • Austria • Austrian architect • Austrian designer • Austrian Museum of Applied Arts and Contemporary Art • design • design critic • designer • diverse oeuvre • domestic culture • exhibition • fashionable conventions • formal qualities • furniture design • household objects • interior design • intuitively developed • Josef Frank • living in the modern era • modernist aestheticsmodernist architecturemodernist furniturenon-representationaloeuvre • pioneering oeuvre • practical use • pragmatic approach to desig • prodigious output • service of convenience • social experience • stylistic dogma • textile design • uncontrived functionality • unpretentious functionality • Vienna

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 DECEMBER 2014

The beautiful decorative patterns of faux tribal masks

"The young Dutch designer starts each of his creations on the basis of a material experiment. This enables him to discover production techniques and aesthetic developments. The result lies within unusual and attractive patterns, colours and structures. ... His love for materials has given birth to a passion for textiles that have a strong impact on his creations and pushed him to imagine a series of bizarre masks, in 2010; masks that are to Matisse, 'a characteristic sign of our essence'."

(The Red List)

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2010abstract forms • aesthetic developments • aesthetic objectsanimal resemblances • animal-mask • Bertjan Pot • carpetcolour • colour combinations • colourful designs • costume designcraft and materialscraftingdecorative artsdecorative sewingdesign craftDutch designfabric • faux tribal art • geometric designs • geometric patterns • handicraft • human face • maskmask-making • material experiment • material practicesmaterials investigationnaive stylepastiche • production technique • rope • rope masks • sewing and craft • sewn together • stylised formstextile artstextile design • The Red List • vibrant colourvisual patternzoomorphism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 AUGUST 2013

Sonia Delaunay and the Art Simultané

"Together, the Delaunay [Sonia and Robert Delaunay] start a research on color that will be the essence, the content and the form but also the line of a new painting for a non–figurative art. Influenced by the Fauvism, she first presents works whose subjects and models are marked, slashed by the brutality of the shades. Creative perfection to aim at, the music offers to the artists, at this time, the philosophical assessment that will underlie their respective works. Powerful associations of rhythms and melodies, the compositions gather in the idea of 'simultaneous' what makes a new challenge for poets and painters. Sonia Delaunay then progressively develops a lyrical use and signification of the color, close from cubism, between rhythm and shade. Repetitions of forms, structures but also colors, her paintings take a direction all her artistic propositions will follow."

(Ozarts Etc, 3 December 2011)

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abstract artabstract artists • art and fashion • art simultanecar • Citroen • colour • colour and fashion • colour and light • colour blocking • contrasting colour • costume designcubist and abstract artcubist conceptionsdesign formalismdesignerfabricfashion design • Fauvism • female artistgeometric designsmodern artmodern womanmodernist aestheticsmodernist paintingmosaicmovement-imagemulti-disciplinary • multi-disciplinary artist • mural • non-figurative art • paintingpatchworkpatchwork quiltpatternrepetitionRobert DelaunaysimultaneismsimultaneitySonia Delaunaytextile design • textiles design • theatrical stage design • theatrical staging • Tissus Delaunay • vibrant colourvisual abstractionvisual artistvisual contrastvorticismwomen artistswomen in art and designzig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 FEBRUARY 2010

Industrial and Social Heritage Accessible Through AHRC Pilot Project

"More than 75,000 intricate lace samples, considered to be of national and international importance, have been placed in a new archive at Nottingham Trent University. The collection – acquired by the university and its forerunners over many years through bequests from lace manufacturers and the lace federation – features many significant items, including some which date back to the 1600s. ...

A new steering group has been formed to support the collection, featuring a range of key academic experts as well as leading figures in lace and museology from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and The Bowes Museum in County Durham. The group will work to link the archive to other significant collections and will be responsible for future exhibitions, research opportunities and promoting and maintaining the relationship between Nottingham and the lace industry.

The majority of donations to the university's collection were made from the late 19th to the mid–20th Centuries and include single pieces, such as cuffs, bonnets and collars; garments and garment panels. There are items in manufacturers' sample books, photographs of lace from a breadth of sources and collections, and portfolios of machine–made lace. The collection not only includes British designs but also portfolios of lace from Italy, France, Belgium, Switzerland, Holland, Germany, Spain, Portugal and Russia.

The collection is regularly studied and researched by representatives from The Lace Guild, various lace and textile organisations, academic experts and undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Dr Amanda Briggs–Goode, programme leader for Textile Design in Nottingham Trent University's School of Art and Design, said: 'It is important for us to conserve and understand the industrial, social and design heritage that this collection brings, and having an official archive space is the ideal way to achieve this. To date, access to the collection has been limited, but this will help us to form the basis of a professional archive which charts the history of Nottingham lace. ...

A project to pilot a database and make key parts of the lace collection web–accessible has also been recently completed, following funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council."

(Katy Cowan, 4 February 2010, Creative Boom magazine)

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1600s • 17th centuryAHRC • Amanda Briggs-Goode • archiveArts and Humanities Research CouncilBelgium • Bowes Museum • collectionconservationcraftcreative industriesdatabasedecorationdesign • design heritage • fabricFrancegarmentGermanyheritagehistoryHollandindustrial heritageindustrialisationlace • lace collection • lace federation • lace industry • lace manufacturinglace-makingmachine-madematerialmuseologyNottinghamNottingham Trent UniversityNTUpatternPortugalRussia • sample books • School of Art and DesignsearchSpainSwitzerlandtechnologytextile designtextilesUK • Venetian • Victoria and Albert Museumvintagevisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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