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Which clippings match 'Information Designer' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 MARCH 2015

Edward Tufte: Envisioning Information



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chartscolour • colour and information • complex data • computer interfaces • courtroom exhibits • diagrammatic visualisationdiagramsEdward Tufte • Envisioning Information (1990) • escaping flatland • Flatland (1884)guidebook • how to explain complex material • information designinformation designer • information display • mappingpop-up booksscientific illustration • scientific presentations • sensemakingstatistical graphicsstatistical informationstereo photographytimetable • visual means

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2013

Will Burtin: pioneer information designer

"Will Burtin, was one of the foremost information designers of the 20th century. Will Burtin was born in Germany and trained as a typographer and designer at the Werkschule Cologne, Germany, where he also later taught. Shortly after emigrating to the United States in 1938, he was commissioned to create exhibition units for the Federal Pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair. From 1943 to 1945, Burtin worked for the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1945, Burtin became art director for Fortune magazine. Later, in 1949, Burtin established his own design firm in New York with clients including Union Carbide, Eastman Kodak, the Smithsonian Institution, and Upjohn Pharmaceuticals. In 1971, Burtin received a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Graphic Arts."

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20th centuryAmerican Institute of Graphic ArtsColognecommunication design • communication designer • design firm • Eastman Kodak • Federal Pavilion at the • Fortune magazinegraphic designgraphic designerinfluential designerinformation designinformation designerinformation graphics • Kolner Werkschulen • layered • New York Worlds Fair 1939 • Print (magazine) • RIT Graphic Design ArchiveRochester Institute of Technology • Scope (magazine) • Smithsonian Institutetypographer • Union Carbide • Upjohn Pharmaceuticals • US Army Air Corps • visual communicationWill Burtin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 FEBRUARY 2010

An introduction to information design

"Information design, also known as communication design, is a rapidly growing discipline that draws on typography, graphic design, applied linguistics, applied psychology, applied ergonomics, computing, and other fields. It emerged as a response to people's need to understand and use such things as forms, legal documents, signs, computer interfaces, technical information and operating/assembly instructions. Information designers responding to these needs have achieved major economic and social improvements in information use.

Today information design is engaged in most complex projects which involve communication with customers, suppliers, partners and citizens – particularly where the costs of misunderstanding are large. Some examples of bad information design might include: forms that are incorrectly completed and costly to process; instructions that cause frustration and even danger and that may damage the reputation of the provider; education materials that fail to promote learning; scientific and technical data that is easily to misinterpret; command and control displays that fail to alert operators to potentially dangerous situations; and websites that are difficult to navigate and unpleasant to look at.

Information design is user–centred. Usually, it is iterative – design solutions are tested and modified repeatedly. Sometimes the testing is local and informal; sometimes a project justifies formal and extensive usability testing and evaluation.

Information designers serve the needs of both information providers and information users. They consider the selection, structuring and presentation of the information provider's message in relation to the purposes, skills, experience, preferences and circumstances of the intended users. To do this they draw on specialist knowledge and skills in a number of fundamental areas."

(Sue Walker and Mark Barratt)

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applied ergonomics • applied linguistics • applied psychology • assembly instructionscommunication design • computer interface design • graphic designgraphicacyIKEAinformation aestheticsinformation designinformation designerinstructions • operating instructions • signagestatistical graphicstechnical informationtypographyUK • visible language • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Tom Edson
24 MARCH 2009

Information Architecture: understanding in the age of also

"Richard Saul Wurman, author and founder of the celebrated TED conferences, describes himself as an 'information architect,' a term that he defines as 'the individual who organizes the patterns inherent in data, making the complex clear. It's a person who creates the structure or map of information which allows others to find their personal paths to knowledge, and it's also the name of the emerging 21st century professional occupation which addresses the needs of an age, focused upon clarity, human understanding and the science of the organization of information.'"

(Ubiquity, ACM)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 FEBRUARY 2004

Information Interaction Design: A Unified Field Theory Of Design

"Interaction Design, which is essentially story–creating and telling, is at once both an ancient art and a new technology. Media have always effected the telling of stories and the creation of experiences, but currently new media offer capabilities and opportunities not yet addressed in the history of interaction and performance. In particular, the demands of interactivity are often misunderstood by all but the most experienced storytellers and performers. How these skills are expressed through interactive technologies and what demands and interests audiences will have for these remains to be understood. Consequently, there are also few sources of information about these issues and the techniques used to meet them. This is new territory that is desperate for some new ideas and cogent explanations. It is also the most critical component to the success of interactive products."
(Nathan Shedroff)

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