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08 NOVEMBER 2012

Dara Ó Briain's Science Club: The Story of Inheritance

"This first episode in a new six–part science series presented by Dara Ó Briain takes a look at the weird and wonderful world of reproduction and inheritance.

Dara chats to leading biologist Professor Steve Jones and finds out how the bicycle did more to improve the human immune system than any other invention, comedian Ed Byrne discovers just how closely related he is to a Neanderthal and materials scientist and engineer Mark Miodownik creates a DNA cocktail with the help of some strong Polish vodka.

Dara is also joined by neuroscientist Tali Sharot, who explores the cutting–edge science of epigenetics and reveals how exercise can change your DNA. Science journalist Alok Jha asks if the human genome project was oversold and the studio audience are put to the test in the elusive search for attraction.

Combining lively and in–depth studio discussion with exploratory films and on–the–spot reports, Dara Ó Briain's Science Club takes a single subject each week and examines it from lots of different and unexpected angles, from sex to extinction, Einstein to space exploration and brain chemistry to music. It brings some of the world's foremost thinkers together to share their ideas on everything, from how to avoid asteroid impact to whether or not we are still evolving."

(BBC Two, UK)

Fig.1 this animation is from Episode 1 or 6 of Dara Ó Briain's Science Club, Tuesday 6 November at 9pm on BBC Two, animated by 12Foot6, Published on YouTube on 5 Nov 2012 by BBC.

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12Foot619532D2D animationAlok Jhaanimated information graphicsanimation • Antonie van Leeuwenhoek • AristotleBBC TwobloodcellchromosomeDara O BriainDNA • double helix • Ed Byrne • egg • epigenetics • female testicles • fly • Francis Crick • Francis Galton • genes • Gregor Mendel • history of ideashuman genome projectillustration to visually communicate informationinheritance • James Watson • Mark Miodownik • materials scientist • miniature • Niels Stensen • ovaries • ovary • peas • preformationism • reproduction • Robert Bakewell • scienceScience Club (tv) • science series • sequential artsexsperm • Steve Jones • story of sciencestudio audience • studio discussion • Tali Sharottree of lifevisual representations of scientific concepts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2012

Powers of Ten: a dramatic representation of our place in the universe

"Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward– into the hand of the sleeping picnicker– with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell."

(Powers of Ten © 1977 Eames Office LLC)

Fig.1 Original video of the "Powers of Ten". 1977, uploaded by EamesOffice on 26 Aug 2010, YouTube.

Fig.2 Interactive presentation of the "Powers of Ten". 2010 Based on the film by Charles and Ray Eames. An Eames Office Website.

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19772010animated presentationatomblood • blood cell • bringing into relation • carbon atom • cellcell divisionCharles EameschartChicagocomposed of partscosmosDNA • Eames Office LLC • Earthfilmgalaxygraphic representationIBMin perspectiveinformation aestheticsinteractive information visualisationinteractive presentationjourney • lakeside • magnificationmagnitudesmicroscopic worldminuscule detailmolecule • outer edges • perspective • picnic • Powers of Ten • proton • Ray Eamesrelational viewrepresentationscalesciencespace • speck of light • subdivisionsuniverseviewvisual communicationvisual depictionvisual dramavisual representations of mathematical conceptsvisual scientific representationsvisual spectaclevisualisation • white blood cell • zooming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2011

Citizen science: predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game

"People exert large amounts of problem–solving effort playing computer games. Simple image– and text–recognition tasks have been successfully 'crowd–sourced' through games, but it is not clear if more complex scientific problems can be solved with human–directed computing. Protein structure prediction is one such problem: locating the biologically relevant native conformation of a protein is a formidable computational challenge given the very large size of the search space. Here we describe Foldit, a multiplayer online game that engages non–scientists in solving hard prediction problems. Foldit players interact with protein structures using direct manipulation tools and user–friendly versions of algorithms from the Rosetta structure prediction methodology, while they compete and collaborate to optimize the computed energy. We show that top–ranked Foldit players excel at solving challenging structure refinement problems in which substantial backbone rearrangements are necessary to achieve the burial of hydrophobic residues. Players working collaboratively develop a rich assortment of new strategies and algorithms; unlike computational approaches, they explore not only the conformational space but also the space of possible search strategies. The integration of human visual problem–solving and strategy development capabilities with traditional computational algorithms through interactive multiplayer games is a powerful new approach to solving computationally–limited scientific problems."

(Seth Cooper, Firas Khatib, Adrien Treuille, Janos Barbero, Jeehyung Lee, Michael Beenen, Andrew Leaver–Fay, David Baker, Zoran Popović & Foldit players)

Nature 466, 756–760 (05 August 2010) doi:10.1038/nature09304 Received 22 January 2010 Accepted 30 June 2010

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algorithm • biochemistry • biomedicalcitizen sciencecollaboration • computational approaches • computational challenge • computer games • computing science • crowdsourcingdiscovery through designDNA • DNA sequence • Foldit • gamesimage recognitioninsight through designinteractive gamesmulti-player • multi-player online game • Nature (journal) • non-scientists • online gameplaying • predication • problem-solving • protein structure prediction • protein structures • scientific problems • scientists • structural biology • text recognitiontheory buildingvisual problem-solvingvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MAY 2011

Spomenik: monumental geometry echoing the shapes of flowers, crystals, and macro-views of viruses or DNA

"During the 1960s and 70s, thousands of monuments commemorating the Second World War – called 'Spomeniks' – were built throughout the former Yugoslavia; striking monumental sculptures, with an angular geometry echoing the shapes of flowers, crystals, and macro–views of viruses or DNA."

(Photo–Eye via Amazon.com)

Jan Kempenaers (2010). 'Spomenik', Roma Publications

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1960s1970sabandoned places in Eastern Europeaesthetics • Antwerp • architectureBalkans • Bosnia • brutalismconcreteCroatiacrystaldeserted placesDNAdocumentary photographerEastern blocflowerfuturisticfuturistic designgeometric formsgeometry • Herzegovina • Jan Kempenaers • Kosovo • Macedonia • macro-views • melancholy beauty • Metohia • modernism • Montenegro • monument • monumental sculptures • neglect • neglected architecture • photographphotographersculpture • Serbia • SFRY • shapeSloveniaSocialist Federal Republic of YugoslaviaSoviet monuments • spomenik • symbolismtypology • victims • virusvisual representations of scientific concepts • Vojvodina • Willem Jan Neutelings • WWIIYugoslavia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Who Am I? permanent exhibition at the London Science Museum

"The Science Museum in London has just undertaken a refresh of its Who am I? gallery, which is dedicated to the genetics, identity and brain science.

The revamped exhibit updates both the science and the design of the 10–year–old gallery, bringing it bang up to date with the very latest advances in genetic research. 'There's been so many advances, we needed to gave another look at the content', Jenny Wong, a content developer at the museum and one of the creators of the gallery, told me.'"

(Nate Lanxon, 25 June 2010)

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20002010 • access-for-all • AllofUs • Anthony Gormley • autism • bang up to date • Blob Dylan • brain science • Casson Mann • Disability Discrimination Act • DNA • Dryden Goodwin • epilepsy • genetic researchgenetics • Graphic Thought Facility • hippocampus • histological sections • human brain • identityindividual identityinteractive exhibitinteractive table • interchangeable components • interconnected installation • Jenny Wong • Jochem Faudet • memory • memory gallery • neurology • permanent exhibition • personal identity • revamp • Revital CohenScience Museum of London • self-discovery • silicon character • South KensingtonWellcome Trust • Who Am I

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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