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22 OCTOBER 2017

Tribes: DISCWOMAN

"The 12-minute documentary ... follows the three co-founders of DISCWOMAN, a New York-based female DJ collective and booking agency, as they share their perspectives on the role women have played within electronic music. ... Also celebrated in the documentary are the shared views of world-renowned female-DJs such as Black Madonna, Nicole Moudaber, Star Eyes, Sandunes, Demian Licht, and Nina Sonik."

(PR Newswire, 8 March 2016)

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TAGS

2016 • all-female line-up • Black Madonna • Christine Tran • Daphne Oram • Demian Licht • Discwoman • DJ • DJ Haram • DJs Umfang • documentary • documentary short • electronic music • electronic music culture • Emma Burgess-Olson • feminist music artist • Frankie Hutchinson • music culture • New York City • Nicole Moudaber • Nina Sonik • Sandunes • short documentary • Smirnoff Sound Collective • Star Eyes • Tygapaw • Volvox • women in electronic music culture • women of colour

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Rap & Hip-Hop was born in 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue

"Hip-hop music is generally considered to have been pioneered in New York's South Bronx in 1973 by Jamaican-born Kool DJ Herc. At a Halloween dance party thrown by his younger sister, Herc used an innovative turntable technique to stretch a song's drum break by playing the break portion of two identical records consecutively. The popularity of the extended break lent its name to 'breakdancing'--a style specific to hip-hop culture, which was facilitated by extended drumbreaks played by DJs at New York dance parties. By the mid-1970s, New York's hip-hop scene was dominated by seminal turntablists DJ Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Herc. The rappers of Sugarhill Gang produced hip-hop's first commercially successful hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' in 1979'.

Rap itself--the rhymes spoken over hip-hop music--began as a commentary on the ability--or 'skillz'--of a particular DJ while that DJ was playing records at a hip-hop event. MCs, the forerunners of today's rap artists, introduced DJs and their songs and often recognized the presence of friends in the audience at hip-hop performances. Their role was carved out by popular African-American radio disc jockeys in New York during the latel96Os, who introduced songs and artists with spontaneous rhymes. The innovation of MCs caught the attention of hip-hop fans. Their rhymes lapped over from the transition period between the end of one song and the introduction of the next to the songs themselves. Their commentaries moved solely from a DJ's skillz to their own personal experiences and stories. The role of MCs in performances rose steadily, and they began to be recognized as artists in their own right [2].

The local popularity of the rhythmic music served by DJs at dance parties and clubs, combined with an increase in 'b-boys'--breakdancers--and graffiti artists and the growing importance of MCs, created a distinctive culture known as hip-hop. For the most part, hip-hop culture was defined and embraced by young, urban, working-class African-Americans. Hip-hop music originated from a combination of traditionally African-American forms of music--including jazz, soul, gospel, and reggae. It was created by working-class African-Americans, who, like Herc, took advantage of available tools--vinyl records and turntables--to invent a new form of music that both expressed and shaped the culture of black New York City youth in the 1970s."

(Becky Blanchard, 1999)

2). Information on MCs drawn from the University of Maryland's "Mcing: The Past" and "MCing: The Present" in "A Brief History of Hip-Hop Culture"

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TAGS

1970s1973African AmericanAfrika Bambaataaappropriation • b-boys • b-girls • Becky Blanchard • black culture • block party • break dancing • breakbeat • breakdance • breakdancing • Cindy Campbell • civil rights movement • Clive Campbell • cultural expression • dance party • DJ • DJ Grandmaster Flash • DJing • extended break • gospel • graffiti art • graffiti artists • Grandmaster Flash • hip-hophip-hop backbeat • hip-hop culture • hip-hop music • hip-hop performance • hip-hop scene • jazz • Kool DJ Herc • l960s • MC • MCing • music history • musical form • New York City • radio disc jockey • rap • rap artist • rap music • rapperreggae • rhyme • rhythmic music • Sedgwick Avenue • skillz • soul • South Bronx • spoken word • Sugarhill Gang • turntable • turntable technique • turntablist • vinyl record • West Bronx • working classworking class cultureyouth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2014

Lecture by curator, theorist and art critic Nicolas Bourriaud

Symposium: Other Perspectives. Hafnarhus, weekend 13 – 14 August 2011.

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2011 • art and philosophy • contemporary artcritical position • cultural sphere • desensitisation • DJ • first modern age • identityideology • instrument realisation • Jacques LacanlocalLouis AlthusserMarcel Duchampmaterial processesmaterialismmaterialitymodernism • new maternity • Nicolas BourriaudPaolo Pasolinipersonal identityphilosophyPiet Mondrianpost-productionpostmodernism • providential man • psychoanalysis • rearticulation • reificationrelational aestheticsReykjavik • Reykjavik Art Museum • sexual fear • social needs • social unconscious • structuralismsymposiumvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 DECEMBER 2013

Nicolas Bourriaud: Postproduction

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amateur cultural productionartistsboundary-crossing • collective story • consumerismcontemporary artcritical discoursecultural and social relationscultural technology • culture of use • database as cultural formDIYDIY craftsDJforms • historised • Hunter College • Jerome Sans • Ludwig WittgensteinMarcel Duchamp • network on signs • new audio theory • new modes of production • newness • Nicky Enright • Nicolas Bourriaud • paths through culture • post • post-productionproduser • programme forms • protocols of usereinterpretationrelational aestheticsremix culturesamplerscriptible • site of navigation • social and cultural forms • sociality • tabula rasa • the new • theory of substantial formstoolsusevisual artwork of art • zone of activity

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
07 DECEMBER 2013

Silver Apples: Early Electronica

"Having languished in obscurity for many years, '60s US duo Silver Apples are now being widely recognised as pioneers of electronica, thanks to their ground–breaking work in melding psychedelic rock with primitive oscillators. At the time, certain switched–on tastemakers such as John Lennon and sometime collaborator Jimi Hendrix sang their praises, but it's been in latter years, with the likes of Beck, the Beastie Boys, Stereolab and Portishead's Geoff Barrow all acknowledging their influence, that the band's renown has grown. Despite having released only two albums during their first flush of creativity, it seems that Silver Apples' electronically enhanced, wigged–out pop has cast a long shadow. 'It's extremely rewarding as an artist that the documents of activity that I did all those years ago are being thought of as references by other musicians,' says the band's singer/electronicist Simeon today. 'It just astonishes me that it's taken on this kind of importance.'"

(Tom Doyle)

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1960s1968Beastie Boys • Beck • cast a long shadow • Danny Taylor • discordant • discordant modality • DJDJ mixesdriving beatdrum kitearly electronicaecho unit • electrical junk • electronic musicelectronicaexperimental electronic music • Geoff Barrow • ground-breaking workindie rockinfluential creators • jack field • Jimi HendrixJohn LennonKarlheinz StockhausenKrautrockminimalist electronicaminimalistic stylemusicNew York • obscurity • original music • oscillator • Overland Stage Electric Band • pioneers of electronica • plywood • Portishead • primitive oscillators • primitive synthesizer • psychedelic music • psychedelic rock • pulsing • rhythm oscillator • rock idiom • Silver Apples • Simeon Coxe • Stereolab • underground dance music • wigged-out pop

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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