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Which clippings match 'Media Ecologies' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 AUGUST 2013

Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media-Specific Analysis

"Many critics see the electronic age as heralding the end of books. I think this view is mistaken. Books are far too robust, reliable, long–lived, and versatile to be rendered obsolete by digital media. Rather, digital media have given us an opportunity we have not had for the last several hundred years: the chance to see print with new eyes and, with that chance, the possibility of understanding how deeply literary theory and criticism have been imbued with assumptions specific to print. As we continue to work toward critical practices and theories appropriate for electronic literature, we may come to renewed appreciation for the specificity of print. In the tangled web of medial ecology, change anywhere in the system stimulates change everywhere in the system. Books are not going the way of the dinosaur but the way of the human, changing as we change, mutating and evolving in ways that will continue, as a book lover said long ago, to teach and delight."

(Katherine Hayles, 2004)

Katherine Hayles (2004). "Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media–Specific Analysis" Poetics Today, Volume 25, Number 1, Spring 2004, pp. 67–90.

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TAGS

2004analogue and digital • analogue resemblance • bookscodecritical enquirycritical practices • cyborg reading practices • digital coding • digital media • distributed cognitive environments • electronic age • electronic hypertext • electronic literature • embodied entities • emergent property • end of booksend of printevolving form • instantiation • interpretation of signsKatherine Haylesliterary criticismliterary theorymaterialitymedia ecologiesmedia specificity • media-specific analysis • medial ecology • medium specificitymutabilitynatural languageobsolete medium • physical characteristics • physical specificity • recombination • renewed appreciation • signification • signifying strategies • somnolence • spaces to navigate • specificity of printtextstransformable • versatile medium • women in cultural theory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 JULY 2013

Are Youtubers Revolutionizing Entertainment?

"Over the past 8 years, YouTube has given birth to an increasingly sophisticated entertainment culture that operates outside of the traditional television and film ecosystem. With humble roots in charismatic and creative people simply sharing their lives, thoughts, and humor to their webcams, YouTube entertainment has diversified and grown into tens of thousands of unique channels with millions of loyal fans and subscribers. With a new generation of viewers increasingly turning to YouTube instead of broadcast TV, a new industry is being built around personalities who have dissolved the barriers between on–screen talent and the audience, and who employ visual aesthetics that make the viewer feel as if they are a part of the creator's life. Truly, we are in a new era of entertainment, one being led by millions of young people who are equally happy to watch video on their laptop as they are on their TV."

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TAGS

amateur cultural productionamateur videoaudiencebeyond the world of broadcastingbroadcast television • charismatic people • confessiondigital narcissism • entertainment culture • entertainment experienceeveryday peoplefansfeedback loop • instant feedback • intimate exchangesintimate lives • Jake Roper • Josh Cohen • Joshua Green • Kornhaber Brown • laptop video • machinimamedia ecologies • media ecosystem • Molly Templeton • new era of entertainment • new forms of television • new industry • new media content productionnew television culturenew voicesnew ways of engagingOff Book • on-screen talent • PBSpersonalitiesproducers and consumers • sharing their lives • their thoughts • TVuser-generated contentvideo bloggerwebvideoyoung peopleYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2010

Centre for Material Digital Culture

"A DECADE after the first Internet boom and the parallel explosion of the connected fields of new media studies, techno–cultural studies, cyber–cultural studies, new medium studies, there is still much discussion of innovation, but there is also an understanding that the first moment of the new has passed. New media has a history, as well as present and future – and of course, it always did. Today, the dynamic of continuity and transformation intrinsic to the relationship between technology and culture can be drawn differently. Innovation continues. Technologists declare web 2.0; the stress shifts from the screen–world to the penetration of the real–world environment by pervasive and intimate forms of new media. New forms of new media continue to arrive; content develops and original modes of use, forms of association, ways of writing or thinking together, spring up. Continuity reasserts itself. Processes of remediation transform old media, but not beyond all recognition. Much remains of 'good old television' in the world of digital TV, the aesthetics of radio persist as it is delivered to us over the net or as a pod–cast, and the conventions and economy of the traditional cinematic apparatus translate into the world of DVD and digital screening in forms we recognize and find familiar. Even the truly innovative media forms, those springing up out of digital technology, now have substantial development histories, their own traditions, and increasingly their own conventions. These last are expressed in code, articulated in the physical architecture of new media networks, found in the dispositions or habitus of users, evident in the consolidation of various genres, and evident also in the contested but provisionally secured cultural capitals circulating around various new media formations.

AT THIS POINT, with this new balance in mind, it is legitimate and timely to re–define the object and its significance, to ask what 'digital culture' or 'networked culture' entails. And so this centre sets out to re–assess forms of thinking about new media technologies as material digital cultures. It asks what material properties, what symbolic properties, what affective or sense perceptive regimes and what political economies, are now invoked under the banner of new media. It explores how the networked digital culture in which we live can be defined and critiqued. And, it argues that this is a moment when new media theory also needs to be re–assessed: What forms of thinking about processes of convergence worked? What were their outcomes? Are they productive in generating ways of thinking and investigating the developing and established new media ecologies within which we now live?"

(Joanne Whiting, University of Sussex)

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TAGS

connectivityconstellationsconvergencecultural capitalcultural codes • cyber-cultural studies • digital culturediscoverydiscursive field • forms of association • habitus • innovative media forms • interactionInternetintimatematerial culturemedia ecologiesnetworked culturenetworks • new media studies • new media theory • new medium studies • old mediapervasivepodcast • real-world environment • remediationrepresentationresearchresearch centre • screen-world • techno-cultural studies • technology and culturetheory building • thinking together • transformationUKways of thinkingWeb 2.0

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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