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Which clippings match 'Distortion' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 NOVEMBER 2016

Download Finished (2006): a procedural video machine

"Download Finished was an online ressource which transformed and re-published films from P2P networks and online archives. Found footage became the rough material for the transformation machine, which translated the underlying data structure of the films onto the surface of the screen. The original images dissolved into pixels, thus making the hidden data structure visible. Through Download Finished, file sharers became authors by re-interpreting their most beloved films. ...

Download Finished questions the relationship between the original and its copy in a digital environment. It deals with questions arising from the cultural practice of file sharing (and the breakages and voids it makes evident within the copyright system)."

(!Mediengruppe Bitnik)

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!Mediengruppe Bitnik (arts collective) • 2006 • Adnan Hadzi • aesthetics • algorithmic reconfiguration • algorithmic remixing • algorithmic transformation • art projectartefactingauthorship • automatic composition • Carmen Weisskopf • chance artcorrupting digital datacut-up • Daniel Ryser • data glitches • data remixing • databendingdigital aestheticsdigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortion • Domagoj Smoljo • Download Finished (2006) • found footage • generative works • glitch aestheticsglitch practitionersglitched out video • online ressource • P2P • procedural remixing • procedural transformation • procedural video machine • re-publishreinterpretation • reinterpreting • remixedrepurposingsynthesis machines • system-based synthesise • systems arttech-art • transformation machine • transformed by technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2012

Glitch art: created purposefully through databending and corruption

"Data glitches are unavoidable. As technology gets more complex, it's easier and easier for a small bug to creep in and ruin your perfect data. But a growing number of artists in different fields are coming to value these glitches, and have begun attempting to insert them purposefully into their work using a technique called 'databending'.

'Glitch art' is a term that there's some debate over: Many argue that it can only apply when a glitch is unintentional –– when it occurs naturally due to an error in hardware or software that leads to the corruption of whatever it is the artist was trying to create.

But there are ways of intentionally inducing some of these glitches, a process called 'databending'. Databending draws its name from the practice of circuit bending –– a practice where childrens' toys, cheap keyboards and effects pedals are deliberately short–circuited by bending the circuit board to generate spontaneous and unpredictable sounds."

(Duncan Geere, 17 August 2010, Wired UK)

Fig.1 Don Relyea, "glitched out video".

Fig.2 David Szauder, "supra glitch".

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aestheticisationaestheticsanalogue errorsartartefactingartefacts • bug • bugs • circuit bending • corrupting digital code • corrupting digital datacorruptioncraft as conceptdatadata glitchesdatabendingdegradationdesign formalismdigitaldigital culturedigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortionerrorexperimentationgenerativeglitchglitch aestheticsglitch artglitch practitionersglitched out videoglitches • glitschig • inducing glitches • malfunction • perfect data • purposeful glitching • randomnessreadymade • short-circuit • supra glitch • tech-arttechniquetechnologyunintentionallyunpredictability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Sarajevo Apartment Blocks: radical reconstruction

"In spaces voided by destruction, new structures can be injected. Complete in themselves, they do not fit exactly into voids, but exist as spaces within spaces, making no attempt to reconcile the gaps between what is new and old, between two radically different systems of spatial order and of thought a webbing of cycles intersecting in space and time."

(Lebbeus Woods Woods, 1997, p.16)

Woods, Lebbeus. 1997 'Radical Reconstruction, New York, U.S.A: Princeton Architectural Press.

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1997apartment blockarchitectural spacearchitecture • Bosnia and Herzegovina • breaking updestroyeddestructiondistortiondwellingheterotopiaLebbeus Woodsmemorymutabilityradical reconstruction • Sarajevo • spaces within spaces • spatial configurationspatial orderurban scarsurban space • voided by destruction • webbing of cycles
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