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10 NOVEMBER 2012

Sita Sings the Blues: audience-distributed animated feature film

"I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.

You don't need my permission to copy, share, publish, archive, show, sell, broadcast, or remix Sita Sings the Blues. Conventional wisdom urges me to demand payment for every use of the film, but then how would people without money get to see it? How widely would the film be disseminated if it were limited by permission and fees? Control offers a false sense of security. The only real security I have is trusting you, trusting culture, and trusting freedom.

That said, my colleagues and I will enforce the Share Alike License. You are not free to copy–restrict ('copyright') or attach Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to Sita Sings the Blues or its derivative works.

Some of the songs in Sita Sings the Blues are not free, and may never be; copyright law requires you to obey their respective licenses. This is not by my choice; please see our restrictions page for more.

There is the question of how I'll get money from all this. My personal experience confirms audiences are generous and want to support artists. Surely there's a way for this to happen without centrally controlling every transaction. The old business model of coercion and extortion is failing. New models are emerging, and I'm happy to be part of that. But we're still making this up as we go along. You are free to make money with the free content of Sita Sings the Blues, and you are free to share money with me. People have been making money in Free Software for years; it's time for Free Culture to follow. I look forward to your innovations."

(Nina Paley)

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TAGS

attribution-share alike • audience-distributioncoercioncontrol • copy-restrict • copyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonsderivative works • Digital Restrictions Management • disseminationDRMeconomic model • emerging economic models • film fundingfree contentfree culture • free culture movement • free softwarefreedom • making money • Nina Paley • old business model • open distribution • payment • permission • Ramayana • Share Alike License • shared culture • Sita Sings the Blues • support artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2012

The European Academy of Design

"The European Academy of Design was formed to promote the publication and dissemination of research in design through conferences hosted by different educational institutions in Europe and the publication of proceedings, newsletters and a journal.

It was also formed to improve European wide research collaboration and dissemination."

(European Academy of Design)

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TAGS

academic design journal • academic journalconference proceedingscreative practicedesign conferencedesign researchdisseminationEADeducational institutionsEuropeanEuropean Academy of Designpractice-based research • publication and dissemination • research collaboration • research in design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2011

ART-e-FACT : STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE / / an online magazine for contemporary art & culture

"In the digital age – in which power lies neither in institutions nor on the streets but on the Web, that is, in the communications system – we seek to exchange ideas about the questions of both culture and art, and of society at large and encourage possible answers."

(ART–e–FACT)

Fig.1 Egle Budvytyte 'The Story of The Fish In the Times of Science and Techno mythologies', Video, 09'06, Amsterdam, 2008

Impressum: ART–e–FACT : STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE / / an online magazine for contemporary art & culture ISSN 1845–5301

Publisher: Omnimedia d.o.o., Branimirova 57, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia, ph.+ 385 1 3636–830, + 385 98 350 860, e–mail: info@artefact.mi2.hr, For the publisher: Dalibor Martinis

Editors: Nada Beroš, Trudy Lane, Antonia Majača (editor–in–chief), Dalibor Martinis, Tihomir Milovac, Leila Topić

Guest editors: Žarko Paić, Marina Gržinić, Zoran Erić

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TAGS

activismappropriationart and cultureart projects • art-culture-technology • ART-e-FACT • artistic and cultural paradigms • borderlinebranded commoditiescapitalismcommunication systemscontemporary artconvergencecritical theorycritiqueCroatia • cultural consumption • digital agedigital culture • digital gadgets • disseminationexchange of ideas • geopolitically • global context • global cultural economy • global outreach • globalisation • globally accepted paradigms • gloc-art • glocalglocalization • glocalogue • local • local flavour • local habits • local tastes • localitymarketingmedia art • multinational companies • new medianew media technologiesonline magazinepower • predatory capitalism • questions of culture and art • representationresistancesocial change • strategies of resistance • technologytechnology reshaped by artists • technomythologies • theoreticians • transformationtransformed by technologyutopiavirtual realitywebZagreb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Show or tell? Opportunities, problems and methods of the exhibition as a form of research dissemination

"The European Academy of Design took a pioneering step in their 1999 biennial conference by including an exhibition of 'practice–based research'. This was refereed in the same way as conventional papers and a number of interesting exhibits were produced, demonstrating a diversity of work and connections between the methods and aims of the exhibitors and those of conventionally published research. In fact the conference award for 'best paper' (on a vote by all delegates) went to one of the exhibitors. Unfortunately the EAD exhibition did not result in a permanent record of the research thus 'published' so the exhibits did not contribute to the recorded body of knowledge and provided no exemplars for future researchers.

A further problem with the EAD exhibition, held in England, was that all the exhibits originated in the UK. Given the difficulty of transporting exhibition materials over long distances, it was reasonable to assume that the format inhibited international contributions and this was reinforced at the 2001 EAD conference in Portugal where exhibits were invited but only one was forthcoming (a graphic design exhibit from Australia) possibly because the ideas of practice–based research were less prevalent in the host country.

Against this background, the Design Research Society decided to include an exhibition in their 2002 Conference, 'Common Ground', held at Brunel University in England. This was an experimental activity and there was uncertainty about whether suitable research exhibits would be forthcoming, how to referee them and how to provide a permanent record. However it was felt that this experiment needed to go further than the preceding EAD venture and make a permanent contribution to our understanding of this form of dissemination. "

(Chris Rust and Alec Robertson, 2003)

1). RUST, C. and ROBERTSON, A. (2003). Show or tell? Opportunities, problems and methods of the exhibition as a form of research dissemination. In: Proceedings of 5th European Academy of Design Conference, Barcelona, April 2003.

TAGS

199920012002 • Alec Robertson • artistic practiceBrunel University • Chris Rust • conferencecontribution to knowledgecreative practiceDesign Research SocietydisseminationEADenquiryEuropean Academy of Designexhibition • experimental activity • future researchers • international contributions • permanent contribution • permanent record • pioneeringPortugalpractice-based research • published • published research • recorded body of knowledge • refereed • research • research exhibits • research outputSHURAUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Communicating knowledge: How & why UK researchers publish & disseminate their findings

"The motivations that lead researchers to publish in different formats–particularly in scholarly journals–differ significantly across disciplines. Researchers in the sciences are more likely to see publication in a learned journal as a 'natural' means of communication with their desired audience, while their colleagues in engineering, the humanities and the social sciences are more likely to see it as meeting essentially external requirements for research assessment and career advancement.

In these latter disciplines, therefore, the rise of journals is more closely associated with an environment where there is increasing emphasis on measuring, assessing, and evaluating research, its outputs and impact."

(HEFCE on behalf of JISC, UK, 2009)

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TAGS

2009academic journalsassessmentaudience • career advancement • disciplinedisseminationfindingshumanitiesJISCjournal articleknowledgelegitimation • means of communication • measurementperformativityposterposter presentationpublicationpublishingRAEresearch • research assessment • research culture • research evaluation • research impactresearch outputresearcherscholarly journalssciencesocial sciencesUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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