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Which clippings match 'Disruption' keyword pg.1 of 2
15 FEBRUARY 2017

Silent-era avant-garde artist-filmmakers disrupting the new realities of mass media (rather than replicating them)

"Around the time Shub started her documentary experiments, 20th century avant-garde artists likewise began using repurposed chunks of mass-produced ephemera. Picasso and Braque threw bits of newspaper into paintings; Max Ernst cut up Victorian illustrations to create proto-surrealist collages; Walter Benjamin, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce pushed the literary practice of quotation into the realm of pastiche; Marcel Duchamp pioneered sculptural assemblage with his readymades; and photomontage blossomed in the graphic works of John Heartfield, Hannah Höch, and Alexander Rodchenko. These works rearranged reality to suit their artists' purposes but, unlike the compilation films, did not try to hide that manipulation. Whether Cubist, Dada, or Constructivist, these artists chose to disrupt the new realities of mass media rather than replicate them, savoring the illogic of dreamlike disjunctions and precipitating new ways to see all-too-common images."

(Ed Halter, 10 July 2008, Moving Image Source)

TAGS

20th centuryAlexander Rodchenkoavant-garde artistsavant-garde cinemaconstructivistcubismcut-up techniqueDadadisruptiondocumentary experiments • dreamlike disjunctions • Ed Halter • Esther Shub • experimental film • found-footage • Georges Braque • Hannah Hochinfluential artistsJames JoyceJohn Heartfield • literary practice • Marcel Duchampmass media • mass-produced ephemera • Max Ernst • new realities • Pablo Picassopastichephotomontagepioneering filmmaker • proto-surrealist collages • quotationreadymade • repurposed archival material • Russian constructivism • sculptural assemblage • Thomas Stearns Eliot • Victorian illustrations • Walter Benjamin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 SEPTEMBER 2016

Examples of parody video remixes using omission

Bush: 2004 State of the Union Remix; Obama State Of The Union remix; OBAMA State of the Union Address 2014 - (PARODY); Palin's Breath; Donald Trump's sniffling and heavy breathing; David Cameron's Conservative Party Conference Speech 2012 [Disrupted]; Nigel Farage and Independence day SPOOF!; Cassetteboy vs The News; Cassetteboy vs The Bloody Apprentice; Jeremy Corbyn's nuclear u-turn and David Cameron's approach to poverty | Cassetteboy remix the news; The Queen responds to Brexit | BREAKING.

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TAGS

200420122014Alan SugarBarack Obama • Boris Johnson • Brexit • Buckingham Palace • Cassetteboy • cleaner • conference speech • Conservative partyDavid CamerondisruptionDonald TrumpEuropean UnionGeorge W Bush • heavy breathing • hyperbole • Independence Day (1996) • Jeremy CorbynLiberal DemocratMichael GoveNigel Farage • nuclear proliferation • omissionparodyparody rebootparody versionparody video remixesplaying against type • political meltdown • povertyPrince Charles • Queen Elizabeth II • reboot • referendum • remixesrepurposing • Sarah Palin • sniff • sniffing • sniffle • spoofState of the Union • taken out of context • The Apprentice (UK TV series)tv news • u-turn • UK EU membership referendum • UKIP • upstagingvacuum cleanervideo compositingvideo remixvs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

The Cut Up Collective and their Cut Up Machine

"The Moustache Foundation is proud to present for its inaugural exhibition, CutUp Machine, a series of new works by the collective CutUp.

CutUp are an autonomous group linked by a shared desire to reorder the urban landscape through intervention and play. Incorporating film, collage and installation, CutUp's practice focuses largely on the creative potential of the street as a site for interventionist art and disruption.

Interested in the spaces of misinformation and miscommunication inherent in the everyday, CutUp aim to introduce disorder into daily existence by interrupting and re–appropriating established visual forms. Occurring both inside and outside the gallery, CutUp's billboard and bus stop works are created by slicing up an advert and reassembling the pieces into a newly ordered image."

(Jaguar Shoes Collective, 4 November 2005)

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TAGS

2005advertising • art collective • arts collective • autonomous group • billboardbus shelters • bus stop works • collagecut-up techniqueCutUp (collective) • CutUp Machine • daily existence • disorderdisruptionestablished visual formseveryday • exploring creative potential • inside the gallery • installation artinterruptingintervention and playinterventionist art • interventionist art and disruption • Jaguar Shoes Collective • landscape • miscommunication • misinformation • Moustache Foundation • new worksnewly ordered imageordering • outside the gallery • pattern • pieces • pixel • re-appropriating • reassembling • reorder the urban landscape • seriessignageslicedsliced-up billboardsslicing upspacesstreet • the street • UKurban landscapevisual artvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JULY 2011

Disruptive versus Radical Innovations

"The innovator's dilemma is this: a company that does everything by the book – listening to customers, managing by facts, being disciplined about costs and quality, and so forth – can get blindsided by an innovation that rapidly takes away its markets, because it was doing everything right. The innovations that cause this 'why bad things happen to good companies' dilemma are disruptive innovations. The signature story of disruption reads as follows: an upstart low–end competitor displaces a much larger incumbent in a market, with the incumbent either retreating upmarket to higher margin/lower volume products or dying out altogether. ...

Examples are smaller, cheaper hard drives disrupting incumbent hard drive makers, hydraulic shovels disrupting cable–winch shovels (an early 20th century example), PCs disrupting mainframes, ink jet printers disrupting laser printers and, most recently, the Nintendo Wii starting to disrupt the Playstation and the Xbox.

Major though they were, innovations such as CDs, laser printing and jet airplane engines were not disruptive with respect to the technologies they displaced ( cassette tapes, light lens Xerography and piston engines respectively). In each case, the incumbents benefited from these non–disruptive, or sustaining innovations.

The key point to remember is that disruption is a market/business phenomenon and has little to do with technology per se. In particular, a disruptive innovation may or may not represent a major technical breakthrough. Major breakthroughs, which are called 'radical' in Christenson's model, may or may not be disruptive, while minor, or 'incremental' innovations can be massively disruptive. The opposite of disruptive is sustaining. Why and how does disruption happen?

A disruptive innovation usually starts as a low–quality differentiated product in a low–volume marginal segment of a much larger mature market, which demands attributes that the mainstream market does not, and which is willing to give up performance attributes the mainstream market is not (example, Wii customers willing to give up sheer processing horsepower for 3d input capability).

A marginal player occupies this segment and starts growing rapidly, solving initial quality problems while retaining a cost advantage.

The incumbent mature market leader, no matter how visionary, is forced to ignore the opportunity because it does not meet the growth needs dictated by its larger size, and also because the disruptive product is not yet good enough for its mainstream customers.

The marginal player goes through a learning curve, solves its quality problems and suddenly starts threatening the market leader in its main markets

The incumbent scrambles to put together a response, nearly always fails because of the disruptor's head start and optimized culture, and retreats to a higher–end market."

(Venkatesh Rao, 23 July 2007)

TAGS

breakthrough • business phenomenon • cable-winch shovels • cassette tapes • CDs • Clayton Christensencompetitor • differentiated product • disruptiondisruptive innovation • disruptive innovations • growth needs • hard drive • hydraulic shovels • incremental • ink jet printer • innovation • innovations • innovators dilemma • jet airplane engines • laser printer • laser printing • light lens Xerography • listening to customers • mainframemarket leader • market phenomenon • Nintendo Wii • non-disruptive • opportunity • PCs • piston engines • Playstationproductradicalradical innovationsustaining innovations • technical breakthrough • Venkatesh Rao • Xbox

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2010

Disruptive Innovation: displacing established competitors

"Disruptive innovation, a term of art coined by Clayton Christensen, describes a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves 'up market', eventually displacing established competitors.

An innovation that is disruptive allows a whole new population of consumers access to a product or service that was historically only accessible to consumers with a lot of money or a lot of skill. Characteristics of disruptive businesses, at least in their initial stages, can include: lower gross margins, smaller target markets, and simpler products and services that may not appear as attractive as existing solutions when compared against traditional performance metrics.

Because companies tend to innovate faster than their customers' lives change, most organizations eventually end up producing products or services that are too good, too expensive, and too inconvenient for many customers. By only pursuing 'sustaining innovations' that perpetuate what has historically helped them succeed, companies unwittingly open the door to 'disruptive innovations'."

(Clayton Christensen)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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