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Which clippings match 'Digital Pioneers' keyword pg.1 of 4
06 FEBRUARY 2014

Pierre Hébert: Around Perception (1968)

"Around Perception is a groundbreaking experiment on computer-based animation, consisting of 11 audiovisual events designed to baffle cognition and unrest comfortable notions of reality. Unlike most of his later films, Hébert chose not to collaborate with top-notch experimental musicians and created the soundtrack himself. In this, he followed a method also used by Norman McLaren: to scratch sound directly onto the film itself. The relation between sound and picture, however, is not as symbiotic as in McLaren's Synchromy: although there are organic reactions between the two domains, one is not a direct translation of the other. This, of course, need not be seen as a weakness. Indeed, with its fast-paced changes of color and geometrical patterns, and the employment of Columbia-like richly crafted electronic tones, Around Perception works as a tremendously hallucinatory exercise in trompe l'oeil (and l'oreille) techniques. Or, as stated by Hébert himself at the beginning of the film, an exercise 'for the mind and against the mind'."

(The Sound of Eye)

Fig.1 "Around Perception", Director: Pierre Hébert, Year: 1968, Time: 16 mins, Music: Pierre Hébert.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2013

Lillian Schwartz: computer-mediated art pioneer

"Produced by Larry Keating for AT&T. 'THE ARTIST AND THE COMPUTER is an excellent introductory informational film that dispels some of the 'mystery' of computer-art technology, as it clarifies the necessary human input of integrity, artistic sensibilities, and aesthetics…. Ms. Schwartz’s voice over narration explains what she hoped to accomplish in the excerpts from a number of her films and gives insight into the artist’s problems and decisions…. I would recommend THE ARTIST AND THE COMPUTER for all grade levels, in classes on filmmaking, art appreciation, and human values.' - John Canemaker, Film News, Animation, Jan.-Feb. 1978. Cine Golden Eagle 1976; New York Film Festival; USIA - Animation and Education 1977; Annual Creative Problem Solving Institute, 1980. Recent screening at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, December 10, 2012."

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TAGS

1976abstract patternaesthetics • American artist • art and coding • artistic sensibilities • AT and TBell Labscomputationcomputer animationcomputer artcomputer art practice • computer art technology • computer historycomputer-mediated artcomputersdigital pioneersdocumentarydrawing with codeearly computer-era • Georges Seurat • history of computinglight penLillian Schwartzmainframemechanical medium • pointillism • visual abstractionvisual artswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 SEPTEMBER 2012

Tuning In: A Film About Karlheinz Stockhausen

"Karlheinz Stockhausen (August 22, 1928 - December 5, 2007) was a German composer, widely acknowledged by critics as one of the most important but also controversial composers of the 20th and early 21st centuries. He is known for his ground-breaking work in electronic music, aleatory (controlled chance) in serial composition, and musical spatialization. ... Similar Artists: Iannis Xenakis, John Cage, Luciano Berio, Luigi Nono, Morton Feldman, Olivier Messiaen, Arnold Schönberg"

(last.fm)

Fig.1 Omnibus (1981). "Tuning In: A Film About Karlheinz Stockhausen", television documentary, BBC1 [published on 13 May 2012 by Thiago Carvalho Fernandes, YouTube].

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1981abstractionacoustic • acoustic abstraction • aleatory • Arnold Schonberg • auditory abstraction • authorshipavant-gardeBBCchance artcomposercomputational aesthetics • controlled chance • creative practicedesign formalismdigital mediadigital pioneerselectronic musicexperimental musicexperimentationGermangroundbreakingIannis XenakisJohn CageKarlheinz Stockhausen • Luciano Berio • Luigi Nono • Morton Feldman • multimediamusicmusic composer • musical spatialisation • Olivier Messiaen • Omnibus (television) • operapatternpioneer • serial composition • spatial media • Stockhausen • television documentaryvoices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2012

Oramics to Electronica: Revealing Histories of Electronic Music

"The story of Electronic Music, from the sound experiments of the 1950s through the digital revolution to today, is one of invention and innovation. Developed with a team of electronic musicians, our exhibition charts this history with examples of music making technology spanning more than 50 years. ...

The story begins with the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and Electronic Music Studios (EMS), two organisations that broke musical boundaries in the postwar years. Objects from this era include the EMS VCS3, the first portable synthesiser.

Also on display is the Oramics Machine, a revolutionary music synthesiser that was created in the 1960s by Daphne Oram, founder of the Radiophonic Workshop. Daphne created this visionary machine that could transform drawings into sound, and it was recently acquired by the Science Museum in co-operation with Goldsmiths, University of London."

(The Science Museum, 2011)

Fig.1 "Oramics to Electronica", Directed, Produced, Filmed and Edited by Jen Fearnley & Nick Street, Commissioned by The Science Museum, London.

Fig.2 "Daphne Oram", Mick Grierson, Director of Creative Computing at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Director of the Daphne Oram collection.

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TAGS

1950s1960s • Acid House • BBC Radiophonic WorkshopBritish • creative computing • creativityDaphne Oramdevicedigital pioneersdigital revolution • drawings into sound • electronic music • Electronic Music Studios • electronic musician • EMS • EMS VCS3 • engineerexhibition • Fairlight Computer Musical Instrument • futuristicGoldsmiths (University of London)historyinnovationinventionmachine • Mick Grierson • musicmusic making technology • music synthesiser • musician • Oramics Machine • Oramics to Electronica • pioneering • portable synthesiser • postwar • Public History Project • Radiophonic Workshop • revolutionary • science and technologyScience Museumsound experiments • Speak and Spell • synthesiser • synthesizer • TB303 • TB303 bass synthesizer • technologytoyUKwomen in music

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2011

Drawing with Code: Works from the Anne and Michael Spalter Collection

29 January to 24 April 2011, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts, USA.

"Drawing with Code brings together a selection of computer-generated art by the form's earliest and most important practitioners from the 1950s to today. The Providence-based collection of Anne and Michael Spalter is one of the largest and most important of its kind in the U.S. and shines a new light onto a darkened corner of the art historical record.

In our current digital environment when just about everyone holds the processing power of a full computer in their pocket, it is difficult to remember a time when computer technology was not involved in every aspect of our lives. In the arts-visual, cinematic, musical, dance, and theater-the computer has become not only an accepted, but in many cases, an intrinsic tool for artistic expression. The artists featured in Drawing with Code emerged in the early computer-era when the technology was rudimentary by current standards and its capabilities rarely extended beyond the world of computation. Merging their interests in art and coding, these practitioners came to be known as 'Algorists,' artists who employed original algorithms to create images. In addition to works on paper, Drawing with Code presents the work of two filmmakers, Lillian Schwartz and Stan VanDerBeek, who were brought into Bell Labs Research by Kenneth Knowlton to make some of the first computer art animations. These six animations were collaborations using Knowlton's BEFLIX (Bell Flicks) programming language for bitmap computer-produced movies.

The artists in Drawing with Code represent some of the earliest innovations in computer-generated art from the U.S., Europe, and Asia, pioneering a new form of collaboration between technology and art that pushed the boundaries of both.

Featured artists: Yoshiyuki Abe, Manuel Barbadillo, Jean-Pierre Hébert, Desmond Paul Henry, Sven Höglund / Bror Wikstörm, Sture Johannessen, G. F. Kammerer-Luka / Jean-Baptist Kempf, Hiroshi Kawano, Kenneth Knowlton, Ben F. Laposky, Manfred Mohr, Vera Molnar, Frieder Nake, George Nees, Lillian F. Schwartz, Stan VanDerBeek, Roman Verotsko, Mark Wilson, and Edward Zajac.

This exhibition is organized by guest curator George Fifield, Director, Boston Cyberarts Inc. and is part of the 2011 Boston Cyberarts Festival."

(deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 2011)

Fig.1 Ben Laposky (1954–1956). 'Electronic Abstraction 4', oscilliscope, high speed film, photo paper, 16 1/2 inches x 13 inches, Collection of Anne and Michael Spalter.

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1950s2011 • Algorists • algorithm • Anne and Michael Spalter Collection • Anne Spalterartart and coding • BEFLIX • Bell Flicks • Bell Labs • Bell Labs Research • Ben Laposky • bitmap • Boston Cyberarts Festival • Bror Wikstorm • codecomputationcomputer artcomputer-generatedcreative practice • Desmond Paul Henry • digital art exhibitiondigital environmentdigital pioneersdrawing with codeearly computer-era • Edward Zajac • exhibitionfilmmakerFrieder Nake • G. F. Kammerer-Luka • generativeGeorg Nees • Hiroshi Kawano • influential worksinnovation • Jean-Baptist Kempf • Kenneth Knowlton • Lillian SchwartzManfred Mohr • Manuel Barbadillo • Mark Wilson • Michael Spalter • musicPierre Hebertpractitionerprogramming languageRoman Verostko • Stan VanDerBeek • Sture Johannessen • Sven Hoglund • technologytheatreVera Molnarvisual arts • works on paper • Yoshiyuki Abe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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