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08 FEBRUARY 2010

Digital Pioneers: the first decades of the computer's history in art and design

"This display provides an overview of the first decades of the computer's history in art and design. It includes some of the earliest computer–generated works in the V&A's collections, many of which have never been exhibited in the UK before. From the 1960s until the early 1980s, digital pioneers worked directly with computer hardware and software to produce graphic images unlike anything that had gone before. Some artists went on to use increasingly sophisticated software packages, while others continued to work directly with the hardware itself.

The display includes plotter drawings, screenprints, digital inkjet prints, photographs and animations, as well as important documentary material from the time. It features pioneers working in science and industry during the 1950s and 60s, such as Frieder Nake, Georg Nees and Herbert W. Franke. Artists who worked with the computer in the 1970s and 80s include Paul Brown, Harold Cohen, Manfred Mohr and Vera Molnar. The show also encompasses more recent works by James Faure Walker, Jean Pierre–Hébert, Roman Verostko and Mark Wilson

Digital Pioneers offers a historical context for contemporary digital practice, and is scheduled to coincide with the V&A exhibition Decode: Digital Design Sensations."

(The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

Fig.1 Herbert W. Franke, Squares (Quadrate), screenprint, 1969/70. Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London. Museum no. E.113–2008

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2010

Decode: Digital Design Sensations

"Decode: Digital Design Sensations showcases the latest developments in digital and interactive design, from small, screen–based, graphics to large–scale interactive installations. The exhibition includes works by established international artists and designers such as Daniel Brown, Golan Levin, Daniel Rozin, Troika and Karsten Schmidt. The exhibition features both existing works and new commissions created especially for the exhibition.

Decode is a collaboration between the V&A and onedotzero, a contemporary arts organisation operating internationally with a remit to promote innovation across all forms of moving image and interactive arts.

The exhibition explores three themes: Code presents pieces that use computer code to create new works and looks at how code can be programmed to create constantly fluid and ever–changing works. Interactivity looks at works that are directly influenced by the viewer. Visitors will be invited to interact with and contribute to the development of the exhibits. Network focuses on works that comment on and utilise the digital traces left behind by everyday communications and looks at how advanced technologies and the internet have enabled new types of social interaction and mediums of self–expression."

(The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

Video capture from Recode by Karsten Schmidt for the Decode website, 2009.

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TAGS

2010abstractioncode • computer code • creative practiceDaniel BrownDaniel Rozindata • Decode • Decode: Digital Design Sensationsdesigndesign formalismdevicediagramdigital art exhibitiondigital culturedigital design • digital traces • exhibitionfluidgenerativeGolan Levininformation aestheticsinstallationinteractioninteractive artsinteractive designinteractivityInternet • Karsten Schmidt • ludicmedia artnetworknew medianotation • onedotzero • pattern • Recode (exhibition) • self-expressionsocial interactionspectacletechnology • The Porter Gallery • Troika • UKVictoria and Albert Museumvisual communicationvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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