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Which clippings match 'Daniel Rozin' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 JUNE 2015

PomPom Mirror: a camera-based interaction artwork

"Rozin's anthropomorphic PomPom Mirror features a synchronized array of 928 spherical faux fur puffs. Organized into a three-dimensional grid of beige and black, the sculpture is controlled by hundreds of motors that build silhouettes of viewers using computer-vision. Along its surface, figures appear as fluffy animal-like representations within the picture plane, which is made permeable by a 'push-pull' forward and backward motion of meshed 'pixels'. Ghostly traces fade and emerge, as the motorized composition hums in unified movement, seemingly alive and breathing as a body of its own."

Daniel Rozin, "PomPom Mirror", 2015, 928 faux fur pom poms, 464 motors, control electronics, video camera, custom software, microcontroller, wooden armature, 48 x 48 x 18 in / 121.9 x 121.9 x 45.7 cm

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2015aesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleanalogue correspondenceanthropomorphismartwork • beige and black • Bitforms Gallery • black and whitecamera-based interactioncomputer based interactive artcomputer visionDaniel Rozindynamic visual representationdynamically changing • fade and emerge • faux fur • fur • ghostly traces • image processing • implied tactile experience • implied texture • interactive artinteractive artworkinteractive visualisationkinetic art • mechanical mirror • microcontrollermicrosoft kinect cameramirror • moving tiles • NYCperceptual organisation • physical pixels • pom pom • PomPom Mirror (2015) • puff • push-pull • real-time motion • surface quality • synchronised array • tessellationtexturetransposing materials • unified movement • Victoria Sendra • visual appearance • visual feedback

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2014

An Informal Catalogue of Slit-Scan Video Artworks and Research

"Slitscan imaging techniques are used to create static images of time–based phenomena. In traditional film photography, slit scan images are created by exposing film as it slides past a slit–shaped aperture. In the digital realm, thin slices are extracted from a sequence of video frames, and concatenated into a new image.

Recently I've seen many new–media projects based on slit–scan techniques. They range from student projects, to Java demonstrations on the Processing.org site, to works by recognized pioneers of video and interactive art. My inclination to make lists is irresistible, and so I've put together this catalogue as an aid to researchers and students. My aim is to be as inclusive as possible, rather than attempt to winnow the projects down to just a few ideal exemplars or the most significant historic precursors. Thus not all of the examples are even computational: some of the projects described below use motion–picture film, still photography, or analog video techniques."

(Golan Levin)

Compiled by Golan Levin. Begun: 1 March 2005. Last edit: 17 July 2010.

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Adam Finkelstein • Adam MagyarAlexei Shulgin • Allison Klein • Alvaro Cassinelli • Andrew Davidhazy • Andy Polaine • Angus Leadley Brown • Anna Szepesi • Ansen Seale • Aristarkh Chernyshev • Bill Spinhoven • Bjorn Barnekow • Bradford Bohonus • Brendan Dawes • Bryan Mumford • Camille Utterback • Christian Hossner • Christian Kessler • Christian Rohner • chronophotography • Claude Hidber • computational art • Dan Kaminsky • Daniel CrooksDaniel Rozin • Daniel Sauter • Datadouche • David Tinapple • Derek Burnett • Dietmar Offenhuber • Dirk Lusebrink • divisionism • Don Whitaker • Douglas Trumbull • E.J. Gone • Eddie Elliott • Egbert Mittelstadt • epipolar diagram • Eric Lee • Fabian Thommen • Geert Mul • George Silk • Glen Murphy • Golan Levin • Greg Ercolano • Guy Hoffman • HC Gilje • He-Lin Luo • image stretching • Jacques-Henri Lartigue • James Seo • Jean-Michel Jarre • Ji-Hoon Byun • Joachim Sauter • Joe Baldwin • Juanjo Fernandez Rivero • Jussi Angesleva • Keith Lam • Kenji Mase • Kevin Atkinson • Kurt Ralske • Mark Hauenstein • Martin Hilpoltsteiner • Martin Reinhart • Masatoshi Ishikawa • Masayuki Akamatsui • Mateusz Herczka • mechanical technique • Michael Aschauer • Michael Cohen • Michael Naimark • Michael Terry • Mindfukc • Miska Knapek • Mitchell Whitelaw • Mogens Jacobsen • multiperspective panorama • Neil Jenkins • new media aestheticsNHK • Nicolas Horne • NYX • Osman Khan • Paul de Marinis • Paul Harter • Peter-Pike Sloan • Pipilotti Rist • Processing (software) • R Greenberg Associates • Robert Seidel • rolling shutter • Roman Haefeli • Romy Achituv • Ross Cooper • Roy Tanck • Sascha Pohflepp • scanner photography • scanning digital camera • scannography • scanography • Scott Carver • Scott Owsley • Sid Fels • slit-scan cameraslit-scan photography • slit-scan techniques • slit-shaped aperture • space-time correlation • space-time representation • spacio-temporal imaging • spatiotemporal imaging • Steina Vasulka • Stephan Schulz • streak photography • strip photography • Susanne Jaschko • synchroballistic photography • Tamas Waliczky • Tania Ruiz Gutierrez • temporal displacement map • temporal movementtime slicingtime-based art • time-based phenomena • time-motion studiesToshio Iwaivideo and digital art • videogram • Virgil Wildrich • William Larson • Zbig Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2010

Digital Pioneers: the first decades of the computer's history in art and design

"This display provides an overview of the first decades of the computer's history in art and design. It includes some of the earliest computer–generated works in the V&A's collections, many of which have never been exhibited in the UK before. From the 1960s until the early 1980s, digital pioneers worked directly with computer hardware and software to produce graphic images unlike anything that had gone before. Some artists went on to use increasingly sophisticated software packages, while others continued to work directly with the hardware itself.

The display includes plotter drawings, screenprints, digital inkjet prints, photographs and animations, as well as important documentary material from the time. It features pioneers working in science and industry during the 1950s and 60s, such as Frieder Nake, Georg Nees and Herbert W. Franke. Artists who worked with the computer in the 1970s and 80s include Paul Brown, Harold Cohen, Manfred Mohr and Vera Molnar. The show also encompasses more recent works by James Faure Walker, Jean Pierre–Hébert, Roman Verostko and Mark Wilson

Digital Pioneers offers a historical context for contemporary digital practice, and is scheduled to coincide with the V&A exhibition Decode: Digital Design Sensations."

(The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

Fig.1 Herbert W. Franke, Squares (Quadrate), screenprint, 1969/70. Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London. Museum no. E.113–2008

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2010

Decode: Digital Design Sensations

"Decode: Digital Design Sensations showcases the latest developments in digital and interactive design, from small, screen–based, graphics to large–scale interactive installations. The exhibition includes works by established international artists and designers such as Daniel Brown, Golan Levin, Daniel Rozin, Troika and Karsten Schmidt. The exhibition features both existing works and new commissions created especially for the exhibition.

Decode is a collaboration between the V&A and onedotzero, a contemporary arts organisation operating internationally with a remit to promote innovation across all forms of moving image and interactive arts.

The exhibition explores three themes: Code presents pieces that use computer code to create new works and looks at how code can be programmed to create constantly fluid and ever–changing works. Interactivity looks at works that are directly influenced by the viewer. Visitors will be invited to interact with and contribute to the development of the exhibits. Network focuses on works that comment on and utilise the digital traces left behind by everyday communications and looks at how advanced technologies and the internet have enabled new types of social interaction and mediums of self–expression."

(The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

Video capture from Recode by Karsten Schmidt for the Decode website, 2009.

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2010abstractioncode • computer code • creative practiceDaniel BrownDaniel Rozindata • Decode • Decode: Digital Design Sensationsdesigndesign formalismdevicediagramdigital art exhibitiondigital culturedigital design • digital traces • exhibitionfluidgenerativeGolan Levininformation aestheticsinstallationinteractioninteractive artsinteractive designinteractivityInternet • Karsten Schmidt • ludicmedia artnetworknew medianotation • onedotzero • pattern • Recode (exhibition) • self-expressionsocial interactionspectacletechnology • The Porter Gallery • Troika • UKVictoria and Albert Museumvisual communicationvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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