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Which clippings match 'Robotic' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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TAGS

1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2013

Machines replace humans: heavy metal robot 3-piece

"I'm impressed with Compressorhead – the three–piece robot band (three and a half if you count the little robot who drives one of the cymbals). I went to their website to see if I could discern the origins of the project, DIY, corporate, academic, or whatever and couldn't really find anything on the makers. Then I tracked down the drummer. Stickboy was created by Robocross Machines and a whimsical roboticist named Frank Barnes. ... Reminds me of the Survival Research Labs robot machines, built for public performance and disturbance."

(Maxwell Schnurer, 5 January 2013, Life of refinement)

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TAGS

3-piece band • AC/DC • Ace of Spades • androidautomateautomationband • Compressorhead • computer controlled musical instrumentcybernetic artcymbals • disturbance • drummereffigyengineering • Frank Barnes • futuristic machinesGermanheavy metalhi-hathumanoid automatonindustrialisationkinetic automatonmachineman machinemechanism • metal band • MIDI • mohawke • Motorhead • musical instrumentplay • public performance • Robocross Machines • robot • robot band • robot machinesroboticrobotic artroboticistsimulationspeculative design • Stickboy • Survival Research Labs • TNT • whimsicalwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2012

The Bruce Lacey Experience: rich and diverse artistic production

"Bruce Lacey (born 1927) is one of Britain's great visionary artists. His lifetime pursuit of eccentric 'making and doing' has been a cathartic working–through of his experiences. This survey of a rich and diverse artistic production is a celebration of both his vibrant life (which includes working with Spike Milligan, The Beatles and Ken Russell) and his art which reveals telling links with the visual culture of the last 60 years. Co–curated by artist Jeremy Deller and art historian Professor David Alan Mellor, the exhibition charts Lacey's artistic development in a career encompassing painting, sculpture, robotised assemblages, theatrical performances and installations, as well as community arts and ritual action performances."

(Camden Arts Centre, 2012)

Fig.1 "Bruce Lacey Final H264 Widescreen 960x540" [Interview for The Bruce Lacey Experience, 7 July 2012 – 16 September 2012, Camden Arts Centre]

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TAGS

2012animated modelsart exhibitionassemblageautomate • Bruce Lacey • Camden Arts Centrecircuscontraptioncontraptionscybernetic art • David Alan Mellor • deviceeccentric • electric actors • electronic artengineering • George Harrison • ingenuityJeremy Deller • Jill Bruce • Ken Russellkinetic artkinetic automaton • ley line • making and doing • making something happen • New Realism • outrageous stunts • performance career • personal psychotherapy • Peter Sellers • ritual action performance • robotroboticrobotic artrobotised assemblagesRoyal College of ArtSpike MilliganstuntThe Beatles • theatrical performances • UK • variety theatre • visionary artist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2010

The 2010 Kinetica Art Fair: Pioneers and Masters of Kinetic Art

"Kinetica Art Fair is produced by Kinetica Museum and is the first of its kind in the UK. It provides collectors, curators and the public with a unique opportunity to view and purchase artworks from leading contemporary arts organisations and artists specialising in kinetic, electronic, robotic, light, sound, time–based and interdisciplinary new media art. For 2010, over 35 galleries and organisations are taking part with over 150 artists exhibiting.

The inaugural 2009 Kinetica Art Fair was a seminal cultural event, attracting over 9,000 visitors, and increased the importance and value of kinetic, electronic and new media art on a global level as well as in the mainstream arts press. Kinetica Art Fair 2010 will again take place at P3, the 14,000 sq ft multi–disciplinary arts venue at 35, Marylebone Rd (opposite Madame Taussauds).

For 2010 a special feature exhibition will be dedicated to the pioneers and Masters of kinetic art, with pieces on loan from private collection as well as original interactive installations from the 1968 exhibition of cybernetic art, Cybernetic Serendipity."

(Kinetica Museum, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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