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Which clippings match 'Walt Disney' keyword pg.1 of 3
06 DECEMBER 2014

Profanity Pop by José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros

"These wonderfully warped depictions of Disney classics is brought to you by artist José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros. His upcoming exhibition, 'Profanity Pop,' is described as a 'celebration of creative freedom in our time' –– creative freedom apparently translating to Snow White taking sexy selfies. There's something surprisingly unnerving about watching your childhood BFFs making out, doing drugs and taking pregnancy tests, no matter how much you thought you'd moved on from your Disney roots."

(Priscilla Frank, 01 August 2014, The Huffington Post)

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2014adult imageryart exhibition • Best Friends Forever (BFF) • botox • Botulinum toxin • candid shotcelebrity culture • contemporary situations • critical reinterpretation • crotch shot • culture jammingexhibitionismfairy tale charactersfan artHuffington Posticonic charactersillustration • imagined scenarios • irreverence • Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros • La Luz de Jesus Gallery • Mexican artistmodern situationsnaughtypaparazziparodypop artpopular culturePrince Charming • Profanity Pop (2014) • reimaginingsselfie • sexy selfies • shipping (fandom)Snow Whitespectacular society • tabloid photo • tabloidisation • taco shot • unwholesomenessvanityWalt Disney • warped depictions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

The talent myth: how to maximise your creative potential

"Most of us grow up being taught that talent is an inheritance, like brown hair or blue eyes. Therefore, we presume that the surest sign of talent is early, instant, effortless success, ie, being a prodigy. In fact, a well–established body of research shows that that assumption is false. Early success turns out to be a weak predictor of long–term success.

Many top performers are overlooked early on, then grow quietly into stars. This list includes Charles Darwin (considered slow and ordinary by teachers), Walt Disney (fired from an early job because he 'lacked imagination'), Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Paul Gauguin, Thomas Edison, Leo Tolstoy, Fred Astaire, Winston Churchill, Lucille Ball, and so on. One theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by taking fewer risks, which eventually slows their learning.

The talent hotbeds are not built on identifying talent, but on constructing it. They are not overly impressed by precociousness and do not pretend to know who will succeed. While I was visiting the US Olympic Training Centre at Colorado Springs, I asked a roomful of 50 experienced coaches if they could accurately assess a top 15–year–old's chances of winning a medal in the Games two years from then? Only one coach raised his hand.

If you have early success, do your best to ignore the praise and keep pushing yourself to the edges of your ability, where improvement happens. If you don't have early success, don't quit. Instead, treat your early efforts as experiments, not as verdicts."

(Daniel Coyle, 25 August 2012, The Independent)

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Albert EinsteinattentionCarol DweckCharles Darwin • coach • Colorado Springs • constructing talent • creative potential • early success • effortless success • Fred Astaire • inheritance • instant success • Leo Tolstoylong-term successLouis Pasteur • Lucille Ball • magical status • Olympic Games 2012 • Olympic medal • Paul Gauguin • perseverance • praise • precociousness • prodigy • risk averserisk-takingStanford Universitytalent • talent hotbed • talent myth • Thomas Edison • top performers • US Olympic Training Centre • Walt DisneyWinston Churchill

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Fallen Princesses: reimagining the everyday life of iconic characters

"Her two recent projects are 'Fallen Princesses', 2009 and 'In the Dollhouse', 2011. 'Fallen Princesses' is an ironic look at children's parables, from Grimm fairy tales to Walt Disney. By placing iconic characters such as Little Red Riding Hood or Snow White in modern situations, the series became a commentary on such everyday scourges as poverty, obesity, cancer and pollution."

(Saatchi Art)

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2009 • Ariel • Brothers Grimm • cancer • childrens parables • Cinderellacritical reinterpretationcultural critiqueculture jamming • Dina Goldstein • everyday lifefairy tale charactersfairy talesfairytale • Fallen Princesses (2009) • iconic characters • In the Dollhouse (2011) • Jacob Grimm • Jasmine • Little Red Riding Hoodmodern situationsobesity • photographic series • photography • Pocahauntas • pollutionpovertyprincess • Rapunzel • reimaginedreimaginingsSaatchi Artshipping (fandom)Sleeping BeautySnow White • The Princess and the Pea • Walt Disney • Wilhelm Grimm

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2012

The Florida Project: Disneyland's fore-project

"During the planning and construction of Disneyland, Walt had been introduced to the basic concepts of urban design and slowly became a self–taught expert in the field. Such seemingly dry concepts as city planning and urban decay fired his imagination. When Disney's Chief Archivist Dave Smith catalogued Walt's office in 1970, one of the books on a shelf behind Walt's desk was architect Victor Gruen's The Heart of Our Cities: The Urban Crisis, Diagnosis and Cure.

'Walt was serious about that city,' Marty [Sklar] explains. 'And he had a lot of work being done at the time' to explore its viability. Walt asked for Marty's help to coalesce his thoughts so he could produce a film to explain the project, and, over the next several months, Marty wrote a script for a 24–minute film that detailed the 'Florida Project.' In the film, an ebullient Walt explains the concept of Epcot – a full–scale city of the future where people would live, work, and play in comfort. An international shopping district would re–create scenes from around the world, and American industry would have a showcase for the latest technologies.

Walt shot the short film in October 1966. Eight weeks later, he was gone.

The brief–but–potent film, however, lived on. It was shown a handful of times in early 1967 to key constituencies: the Florida Legislature, invited guests (for a packed presentation in a Winter Park theater), and once on statewide television. The film proved vital in convincing both the Legislature and voters that Disney's Florida Project should be approved, which it was. From the moment the project was given the go–ahead, Marty says, the Company's resources were dedicated to getting Walt Disney World up and running and to regaining confidence in the absence of its founder and leader."

(John Singh and Steven Vagnini, 07 June 2012)

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1964 • 1964 New York Worlds Fair • 1966amusement parkanniversaryarchitectural conjecture • astuter computer • city • city planning • concept artwork • Disney World ProjectDisneylandEPCOTEPCOT Center • Epcot music • Epcot on Film • Epcot tunes • evolving city • Experimental Prototype Community of TomorrowFloridafuturistfuturisticfuturistic designgeodesic • geodesic sphere • idealismimagineering • Marty Sklar • never made it off the drawing board • noveltypavilionRay Bradbury • smellitzer • technological innovationtechnological utopianism • technology showcase • theme parkurban designurban planning • Victor Gruen • Walt DisneyWalt Disney CompanyWalt Disney WorldWalt Disney World Resort

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MARCH 2012

Gerald Scarfe: Drawing inspiration

"Gerald Scarfe is known for thirty years of brilliant caricatures that have appeared in Private Eye, the New Yorker and the Sunday Times, as well as his artwork for Disney's Hercules, the titles fo Yes Minister and Pink Floyd's The Wall. In this film, shot in his studio, the distinguished British illustrator and cartoonist draws us a picture and discusses the lasting influence of the V&A."

(V&A Channel)

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art and design practitionersartwork • British illustrator • caricature • cartoon fabrications • cartoonistdepictions of real-life peopledistorted appearance • editorial cartoon • exaggerated appearance • Gerald Scarfe • graphic arts • Hercules • illustrationillustrative styleillustratorinterview • Pink Floyd • politician caricaturepractitioner interview • Private Eye (magazine) • satirical representation • stage designer • Sunday TimesThe New Yorker • The Wall (music) • UKV and A • V and A Channel • Victoria and Albert Museumvisual designWalt Disney • Yes Minister

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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