Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Victim' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 NOVEMBER 2013

Virtual girl called 'Sweetie' used to stop webcam child sex tourism

"To show how unrestrained child predators can act but also to show how easy it is to track them down the Dutch child rights organisation put itself in the shoes of a 10–year–old Filipino girl. With an innovative technology the virtual character Sweetie was created to be controlled by Terre des Hommes researchers. From a remote building in Amsterdam the researchers operated in public chat rooms. In a very short period, over 20,000 predators from around the world approached the virtual 10– year–old, asking for webcam sex performances. While the adults interacted with the virtual girl, the researchers gathered information about them through social media to uncover their identities. With this evidence Terre des Hommes Netherlands is pushing all governments to adopt proactive investigation policies, with a world wide petition, starting today."

(Hans Guyt, The Hague, 4 November 2013, Terre des Hommes)

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TAGS

20133D visualisationAmsterdamavatarbelievabilitybotchat roomchild abuse • child exploitation • child pornographychild protection • child rights • child sex tourism • child victims • developing nationsdigital actorsexploitation • Filipino • girl • Hans Guyt • human-likehyperrealismillegal behaviourinnovative technologylaw enforcementlifelikelolitaNetherlandsonline youth victimisation • perpetrator • Philippines • post-traumatic stress • posting onlinepredatorprotectionpuppetreal-life dollsafeguardingsex crimesex offenders • sex tourism • sexual acts • sexual exploitationsexual fetishsexual slaverysexualised depictions • Sweetie (virtual girl) • synthespian • Terre des Hommes • victimvirtual charactervirtual girlvisual depictionvoyeurismvulnerabilityvulnerable groupsvulnerable peoplewebcam • webcam child sex tourism • webcam sexyoung childrenyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

The x:talk project: a sex worker-led knowledge sharing co-operative

"In early 2006 several activists based in London who are involved in sex worker rights activism, organising within the International Union of Sex Workers in particular, began to conceptualise and organise around the x:talk project–one that would seek to explore and expand the ideas and confidence we have developed in criticising the mainstream human trafficking discourse, drawing on insights we have gained from sex workers', migrant and feminist struggles.

The racist and anti–feminist trafficking rhetoric of 'protection', mainstream anti–trafficking campaigns that reduce women to only passive victims, under the control of organised crime or of cruel men produces and justifies deportation of migrant sex workers and increases the criminalisation and exploitation of workers in the sex industry. It creates divisions between migrants' and sex workers' forms of organisation and resistance.

We found language and communication to be crucial elements to directly challenge and change conditions of work and life, and to come to together and to organise. Communication is in our view central to change. Language is a basic individual and collective power that improves both possibilities to work and possibilities of resistance.

Central to our vision stands the autonomy of all people moving across borders and the dignity of every gender employing their resources in the sex industry. Central to our understanding of gender and social relations is an understanding of sex work as labour. People who sell sex are involved in a labour process in many respects similar to other paid personal services exchanged on market. At the same time we recognise that the ways in which sex work has existed are also deeply interrelated to the ways in which 'female' services, such as caring, domestic, sexual and reproductive activities are supposed to be provided. It is important to consider that the demand for money for sex in a transparent and potentially contractual way is often a break and significant shift in the way women are expected to give these services for no remuneration.

We consider that a feminist analysis and practice is crucial to changing the sex industry. Women represent the majority of workers in the industry and gendered sexualised and reproductive labour have historically constituted a central part in the structures that subordinate and oppress women. The people that have taken the main initiative of this organisation and project are women. Starting from the ground up, in a grass roots way we nevertheless aim to work with the whole industry. Due to the demographics of the workforce in the sex industry, women play a central role in the organisation and are expected to make up a majority of participants in the classes. We/they represent the majority and we/they enjoy the strongest voice at the moment. However issues of gender and transgender difference–at their intersections with racial and sexual issues are taken into account in the development of activities in order to include people from across the industry and from diverse backgrounds.

In contrast to the current mainstream anti–trafficking policies and discourses we work towards the improvement of working conditions in the sex industry; for rights and recognition of workers; the right to change work and not to be forced to stay with the same employer and the right to stay and not to be deported. Our organisation is based on a practice of sex workers self organisation and our projects are primarily built on an activity of networking with those that have already organised similar projects according to these principles."

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TAGS

2006activism • anti-trafficking campaigns • anti-trafficking discourses • anti-trafficking policies • autonomyborders • co-operative • collective power • criminalisation • cruel men • deportation • dignity • domestic services • empowermentexploitation • female services • feminist analysisfeminist perspectivefeminist struggles • forced labour • gender and social relations • gender difference • gendered labour • grass roots • human trafficking • immigrant experience • International Union of Sex Workers • knowledge sharing • labour process • language barrierslanguage learnerslanguage of thingslanguage skillslanguages of legitimationLondon • migrant sex worker • migrant struggles • migrant workers • organised crime • passive victims • personal services • power relationsprostituteprostitutionprotectionracist language • remuneration • reproductive activities • reproductive labour • rights and recognition • safeguarding • safer conditions • sexsex industry • sex work • sex worker • sex worker rights • sex workers • sexual exploitation • sexual issues • sexual slavery • sexualised labour • subordinate womentrafficking • trafficking rhetoric • transgender difference • victimwomenworkforce • working conditions • x:talk project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2013

ANAR Foundation: targeting children through lenticular imagery

"ANAR Foundation manages in Spain the European unique phone number 116 111, to attend children and teenagers under a risk situation. On this telephone number, only for minors, they can find the help they need in a totally anonymous and confidential way. But, how can we get our message to a child abuse victim, even when they are accompanied by an adult their aggressor?

Knowing the average height for adults and children under 10, we have created two different messages. Using an outdoor lenticular we show adults an awareness message, while children see a message where we offer them our help and show them the telephone number. A message only for children."

Fig.1 campaign created by Grey Spain (Grey EMEA, http://grey.com/emea/).

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TAGS

abuse • aggressor • ANAR Foundation • average height • awareness message • child abusechild protectionchildrendifferent angles • different height • displaydisplay advertising • Grey EMEA • GREY Group • height • lenticular image • lenticular imagerylenticular printing • only for children • optical effect • outdoor lenticular • perspective view • printed images • revelation • risk situation • secretsecret messageSpainstreet signteenagervictimviewing angleviewing perspectivevulnerable groups

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2010

EvoFIT Facial composite system for identifying suspects to crime

"A facial composite is a picture of a suspect to crime (as seen on TV crime programmes and in the newspapers). Traditional composite systems used by the police require witnesses to describe an assailant's face and then to select individual facial features (producing a "composite" face). This process does not work well: we are not good at describing faces nor selecting individual features.

We have developed a different approach at the University of Stirling and the University of Central Lancashire. Unlike current systems, faces in EvoFIT are modelled in their entirety and are not separated into component parts. A facial composite (the new term for 'photofit') is created by first displaying a number of faces containing random eyes, noses, mouths, etc. A witness selects a few of these faces that are most similar to a criminal. The selected faces are then mixed or 'bred' together to produce another set for selection. Repeated a few times allows a composite to be 'evolved'."

(Charlie Frowd)

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TAGS

charactercrimedrawing • EvoFIT • evolutionfaceface perceptionfacial compositeICT • identikit • identityinformation aesthetics • photofit • policerepresentationresearch • seen on TV • sketchtechnologyUK • University of Central Lancashire • variationvictimvisual depictionvisual identityvisualisationwitness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 AUGUST 2005

Counselling Through Online Visual Tools

"The Online counselling: Client outcomes (OcCo) is a project developed at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), and funded by the Australian Research Council (2004–2005). The project involves the research and creation of counselling framework in the form of online visual counselling tools. The framework has been developed at QUT and introduces a number of unique components that changes the way online counselling is conducted in an online environment. The tools have been designed to be client–centred, strengths–based, narrative and solution–focussed. One feature of the tools is their ability to enable young people to communicate their concerns to a counsellor. The tools allows them to present their concerns in a visual manner using interactive sociograms (relationship mapping), genograms (family mapping) and life events charts (self mapping). This brings one of the fundamental principles of traditional counselling – exploration of relationships – into the graphical online environment."

(Oksana Zelenko)

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TAGS

ARCAustralian Research Councilchild abusechild protectionchildrencounselling • counselling framework • diagnosis • genogram • instructional design • Kids Helpline • OcCo • Oksana Zelenko • online counselling • QUT • self mapping • sociogramvictimvulnerable groupsyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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