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Which clippings match 'Trademark' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 JANUARY 2014

Brandmarks with elegance by Helvetic Brands

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TAGS

brand • brandmark • brandmark designclean design • David Pache • design agencydesign consultancydesign formalismdesign simplicityelegant designformalist design aesthetics • Helvetic Brands • independent design consultancy • International StyleLausannelogo designlogo designers • minimal design • minimalistic stylesimple design • strip away • stripped back • stripped back aestheticsSwiss StyleSwitzerlandtrademarkvisual simplicity • white space

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 OCTOBER 2012

Legal issues: intellectual property rights for the design industry

"Intellectual property law is made up of many elements of legal protection and a business might be concerned with any number of them. In some cases, IP ownership and its associated protection is inherent in the creation of the work and does not necessarily require further registration. Copyright is one example, which typically applies to 'artistic' works, such as books, music, software code and graphics. In other types, such as patents, registration is required. The tricky aspect is that any given design may qualify for one or more of the different intellectual property rights. Graphic design for a book, for example, would qualify for copyright, whilst the graphic elements of product packaging–such as the colours, lines or contours – might qualify for a 'registered design right', which is a different thing. The main types of intellectual property rights are: patents, copyright, unregistered design right, registered design right, trademarks."

(Design Council, UK)

TAGS

Anti Copying in Design • artistic works • book designbooksbusinesscopyright • creation of the work • Design Council (UK)graphic design • graphic elements • graphicsguide • guides for designers • intellectual propertyintellectual property lawintellectual property rights • IP ownership • lawlegallegal issues • legal protection • musicownershippackaging designpatent registrationpatentsprotection • registered design right • software codetrademarktrademarksUK • unregistered design right

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MAY 2010

Balancing the interests of creators with society's interest in fostering later expression and creation of new works

"several theoretical views support the position that in life one has strong economic and non–economic claims for control over one's intangible creations. Yet, the paper finds that historical and literary theory in conjunction with recent economic arguments of Professors Brett Frischmann and Mark Lemley regarding positive externalities generated by access to ideas and information, militate in favor of limits on heirs' control over these creations. Furthermore, insofar as society provides the building blocks from which these creations arise, all the theories show that creations must at some point become part of the commons to enable others to generate new creations. Thus the paper argues against the growth of trademark or trademark–like author's rights which have no temporal limit and offer heirs extreme control over access to and use of an author's work and seeks to balance the interests of creators with society's interest in fostering later expression and creation of new works."

(Deven Desai)

Desai, Deven R., Property, Persona, and Publicity (August 21, 2007). TJSL Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1008541. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1008541

TAGS

2007accessaccess to ideasaccess to information • author's rights • authorshipbereavement • Brett Frischmann • commonscontrolcopyrightcreationculture • Deven Desai • ethicsexpressionheirsintangible creationsintellectual property • Mark Lemley • new creations • new worksownershippersonaprivacy rightsproperty • right of publicity • social constructionism • spillover • SSRNtrademark

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2010

Did You Say “Intellectual Property”? It's a Seductive Mirage

"It has become fashionable to toss copyright, patents, and trademarks–three separate and different entities involving three separate and different sets of laws–into one pot and call it 'intellectual property'. The distorting and confusing term did not arise by accident. Companies that gain from the confusion promoted it. The clearest way out of the confusion is to reject the term entirely."

(Richard M. Stallman)

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
17 JANUARY 2010

Colour Space: The Coolest Shades in Corporate America

"Companies spend millions trying to differentiate from others. Yet a quick look at the logos of major corporations reveals that in color as in real estate, it's all about location, location, location. The result is an ever more frantic competition for the best neighborhood. Here's a look at the new blue bloods."

(Michael Rock, p.157)

Fig.1 Rock, Michael. (2003). 'Color Space Coolest Shades in Corporate America.' Wired Magazine.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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