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Which clippings match 'Found Footage' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 APRIL 2017

Sonic Outlaws Documentary (1995)

"Sonic Outlaws, a fragmented, gleefully anarchic documentary by Craig Baldwin, approaches this incident from several directions. Some of the film is about the legal nightmare that ensued from Negativland's little joke. In a highly publicized case, U2's label, Island Records, charged Negativland with copyright and trademark infringement for appropriating the letter U and the number 2, even though U2 had in turn borrowed its name from the Central Intelligence Agency. SST then dropped Negativland, suppressed the record and demanded that the group pay legal fees. Trying to remain solvent, Negativland sent out a barrage of letters and legal documents that are now collected in 'Fair Use', an exhaustive, weirdly fascinating scrapbook about the case.

Sonic Outlaws covers some of the same territory while also expanding upon the ideas behind Negativland's guerilla recording tactics. Guerilla is indeed the word, since these and other appropriation artists see themselves as engaged in real warfare, inundated by the commercial airwaves, infuriated by the propaganda content of much of what they hear and see, these artists strike back by rearranging contexts as irreverently as possible. Their technological capabilities are awesome enough to mean no sound or image is tamper-proof today."

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1995 • Alan Korn • anarchic documentary • appropriation art • appropriation artist • audio collage • Bill Daniel • billboard bandit • bone-dry educational film • Casey Kasem • cellular phone scanner • Chris Grigg • commercial airwaves • copyright infringement • Craig Baldwin • cultural criticismculture jamming • David Wills • documentary collage • Don Joyce • Doug Kahnfair usefound footage • guerilla recording tactics • guerrilla tactics • independent rock band • John Heck • John Oswald • Josh Pearson • Linda Morgan Brown • Lloyd Dunn • Lone Ranger • Mark Hosler • media jammer • media piracy • media recontextualisation • multimedia plagiarism • music samplingNegativland • noise maker • Paul Neff • pirated audiotape • public information film • Public Works Productions • Ralph Johnson • recontextualisation • Richard Lyons • Roger CormanRonald Reagan • sample based artist • sampled music • satirical samplings • Silly Putty • sly commentary • Sonic Outlaws Documentary (1995) • stealing ideas • subversive fun • tape music • Tape-Beatles • trademark infringement • U-2 spy plane • U2 (band) • video collage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2016

Download Finished (2006): a procedural video machine

"Download Finished was an online ressource which transformed and re-published films from P2P networks and online archives. Found footage became the rough material for the transformation machine, which translated the underlying data structure of the films onto the surface of the screen. The original images dissolved into pixels, thus making the hidden data structure visible. Through Download Finished, file sharers became authors by re-interpreting their most beloved films. ...

Download Finished questions the relationship between the original and its copy in a digital environment. It deals with questions arising from the cultural practice of file sharing (and the breakages and voids it makes evident within the copyright system)."

(!Mediengruppe Bitnik)

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!Mediengruppe Bitnik (arts collective) • 2006 • Adnan Hadzi • aesthetics • algorithmic reconfiguration • algorithmic remixing • algorithmic transformation • art projectartefactingauthorship • automatic composition • Carmen Weisskopf • chance artcorrupting digital datacut-up • Daniel Ryser • data glitches • data remixing • databendingdigital aestheticsdigital detritusdigital errorsdigital materialismdistortion • Domagoj Smoljo • Download Finished (2006) • found footage • generative works • glitch aestheticsglitch practitionersglitched out video • online ressource • P2P • procedural remixing • procedural transformation • procedural video machine • re-publishreinterpretation • reinterpreting • remixedrepurposingsynthesis machines • system-based synthesise • systems arttech-art • transformation machine • transformed by technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2010

Standard Gauge: examining the shards of the film industry frame by frame

"Standard Gauge is an autobiographical account of a few years in the film career of its maker. Such, at least, is its ostensible form and purpose. The material from which the film is composed is pieces of 35mm motion picture film, a width known in former times as standard gauge, that its maker collected while working in and around the commercial motion picture industry. The pieces are a miscellaneous assortment, and include narrative features, trailers, newsreels, commercials, and pieces of head and tail leader. ...

By examining the shards of the industry frame by frame, it discovers some of the means and themes of experimental film living, so to speak, in Hollywood. And at the same time, the film engulfs and usurps the material of the commercial motion picture industry, turning it into its subject. Thus Standard Gauge proposes a kind of mutuality or interdependence between two kinds of filmmaking that by conventional standards are thought to be divided by an unbridgeable chasm. By means of a mutual interrogation between 35mm, the gauge of the industry, and 16mm, the gauge of the independent and amateur, Standard Gauge proposes to unify film of every kind."

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16mm198435mmartefact • China girl • commentaryephemeraexperimental filmfilmfilmmaking • forensic • found footagefound imagesframe by framegleanerHollywoodindependent cinemamaterial culturememorabilia • Morgan Fisher • scavenged • Standard Gauge • stop frametechnologyvernacular photography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2008

Situationist cinema attempt to critique capitalist consumption practices

"Debord's mode of cinematic situation construction owes much to Marx's understanding of the relationship between production and alienation, especially as articulated in the Economico-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. For Marx, the commodification of labour in a capitalist society means the loss of reality for the worker; in turn, the subsequently produced commodity ensures her simultaneous loss of and bondage to the object produced. Situationist cinema reverses this trend by refusing to produce any new filmic 'work', any reified artifact for consumption whose potential exchange value might negate the use-value acquired in its spatio-temporal projection and the subsequent construction of an indeterminately meaningful event.

Debord picks up Marxian concepts that the Marxist tradition hitherto had all but ignored, frequently echoing Marx's conclusion that alienation appears as the true induction into civil life, and, even more significantly, his observation and critique of 'commodity fetishism' in capitalist society. (3) The spectacle, Debord argues, thrives on the repetition of commodity form, reinvesting the structure with seemingly new products and images. By compiling image after image of the commodification of life by consumer capitalism (female bodies, political figures, product advertisements, popular films, and so on), his films expose this oppressive repetition and artificial sense of the new, and, as if to help along one of the most problematic concepts in Marx's work, Society of the Spectacle (1973) ponders the commodity's 'metaphysical subtleties' while sequentially imaging automobile showrooms and naked cover girls."

(Ricky Crano, 2007)

Crano, R. (2007). "Guy Debord and the Aesthetics of Cine-Sabotage." Senses of Cinema.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JULY 2005

Bill Morrison's Decasia: Decomposition Disrupting A Smooth Transfer Between Images

"Like many experimental filmmakers, [Bill] Morrison is fascinated more by the physical properties of film than its use as a transparent medium for the projection of images, an orientation he chalks up to his background in painting. In its pristine state, celluloid is a flat, smooth strip which passes effortlessly through a projector. But as it begins to decay, the celluloid buckles and shrinks and the image–fixing emulsion disintegrates — spectacularly in the case of volatile nitrate stock, which was the industry standard until 1951. Such decomposition is a preservationist's worst nightmare, but for Morrison, it represents a way of disrupting the smooth transfer between images which, 24 times a second, characterises traditional narrative film."

Sam Adams (Philadelphia City Paper)

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2002avant-garde • Bill Morrison • cameraless cinema • celluloid • Decasia • decay • decompose • filmmakerfoundfound footagematerialist cinemamateriality • nitrate film • preservation • Sam Adams • USA
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